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Types of Scholarly Articles
 
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Identify the types of articles you will find in a scholarly journal. This video addresses examples of empirical studies, literature reviews, and editorials.
Views: 25304 VCU Libraries
How To Write An Article Review (Definition, Types, Formatting)
 
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In this video, James from EssayPro explains how to write an article review from start to finish. In the beginning, James states an article review is a critical, constructive evaluation of literature in a particular field through summary, classification, analysis, and comparison. If it is a scientific review article that uses database searches to portray the research. The article review is broken down into 5 core parts: Summarization, classification, analysis, critiques, and comparison. These core parts require one to use theories, ideas, and research, relevant to the subject area of the article. Afterward, James mentions that there are different types of article reviews. First of all, there is the journal article review which will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of an article. Next, there is the research article review which differs from a journal article review by the way that it evaluates the research methods used and holds that information in retrospect to analysis and critique. Lastly, there is the scientific article review which involves anything in the realm of science. Often, scientific articles include more information on the background that you can use to analyze the article in a more comprehensive way. Afterwards, James explains the importance of properly formatting an article review. The steps involved in this process are: 1. Pre-title page: here, you will want to list the type of the article that you are reviewing, the title of the article, all the authors who contributed to the article, authors affiliations (position, department, institute, city, state, country, email ID) 2. Optional corresponding author details: name, address, phone number, email, and fax number. 3. Running head: This is only in APA format. It is the title of your paper shortened to less than 40 characters. 4. Summary page: This can be optional, depending on what your instructor assigns. The summary should be a maximum of 800 words long. Use simple and non-technical language. Do not repeat text verbatim or give references in this section. 5. Title page: which will contain your title (obviously) 6. An Introduction 7. The Body: Include headings and subheadings 8. A Works Cited/or References page 9. Possibly followed by Tables and Figure legends (if instructed by the professor) After finishing your rough draft, make sure to do these last 3 steps: 1. Summarize the Article Make a summary of the article by revisiting what the author has written about. Note relevant facts and findings of the article. Include the author's conclusions in this section. 2. Critique the Article Present the strengths and weaknesses that you have found in the article. In addition, highlight the knowledge that the author has contributed in the field. Also, write about the gaps and contradictions in the article. Take a standpoint of either supporting or not with the author's assertions but support your arguments with facts and relevant theories that are pertinent to the area of knowledge. Rubrics and templates can also be used to evaluate and grade the person reviewing the article. 3. Crafting a Conclusion In this section, revisit the key points of your piece, your findings of the article, and your critique. Also write about the accuracy, validity, and relevance of the results of the article review. Give the way forward for future research in the field of study. Lastly, re-read your piece a day after you finished writing it. This will help you spot grammar mistakes and see any flaws in the organization so you aren’t having to make tons of revisions due to small errors.
Views: 8919 EssayPro
Types of Reviews
 
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This video describes what a literature review is as well as the main features of three types of reviews: Narrative reviews, systematic reviews, and scoping reviews
Types of Journal Articles
 
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This presentation briefly describes the types of peroidicals and which ones contain peer-reviewed material. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Views: 2811 Amaris Guardiola
How to Write a Literature Review
 
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A Literature Review is an objective, concise, critical summary of published research literature relevant to a topic being researched in an article. The two most common types of literature reviews found in journals are those introducing research articles (studies and surveys) and stand-alone literature analyses. They differ in their scope, length, and specific purpose. This video provides a detailed explanation of what do include, what not to include, how to structure, and how to compose a literature review from start to finish. Related YouTube videos: "How to Write a Research Paper Introduction" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTC-5P1VFFU) "Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcuL_IaRtXc) "How to Write an Abstract for a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMEnRBss6V4) "How to Write a Research Paper Title" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl1q-I3bE0c) Wordvice Resources Page "Useful Phrases for Academic Writing" (https://wordvice.com/useful-phrases-for-writing-academic-papers/) "Common Transition Terms in Academic Paper" (https://wordvice.com/common-transition-terms-used-in-academic-papers/) "Active and Passive Voice in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/video-should-i-use-active-or-passive-voice-in-a-research-paper/) "100+ Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing" (https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/) "Tips for Paraphrasing in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/a-guide-to-paraphrasing-in-research-papers-apa-ama/) External Resources University of Minnesota. "Guidelines for Writing a Literature Review." (http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html) The UNC Writing Center. "Literature Reviews." (https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/literature-reviews/) Wordvice offers editing services in several languages and countries: ENGLISH: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
How to publish research paper in unpaid/Scopus/SCI/peer-reviewed Journals....
 
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In this video, almost everything about research paper publication is discussed means research paper, their types, where to publish research paper. How to select conference or journal for publication and at the last a methodology of publishing research paper in refereed Scopus/SCI journals in 3 to 4 months is explained with proper example #paperpublication #researchpaperpublication #researchpaper #scopusindexedjournal #unpaidjournal #technilesh #myresearchsupport
Views: 26772 My Research Support
Research vs. Review Articles
 
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Distinguish between research and review articles using a few characteristics.
Views: 2474 jenniferleeucalgary
Journal Article types
 
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To be viewed after the Journal Elements video. See how the journal elements combine into different types of articles.
Views: 1914 drwilliamashton
Types of Research Papers
 
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Watch the video to have a clear understanding of the most common types of a research paper. You can get more information on our website: https://essay-academy.com/account/blog/types-of-research-papers
Views: 1812 Essay-Academy.com
How to write a literature review
 
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How to write a literature review. It’s easier than you might think! In this video, I demonstrate how to search the literature and identify relevant papers for your literature review. I do a pubmed search using Boolean operators and MeSH terms (these are extremely powerful tools that will help you sift through the large number of academic papers out there). So if you’re doing a master’s thesis or a PhD, or you’re doing research and writing a paper, at some point, you’ll need to do a lit review. A big part of that review is the search and this video is going to help you get that right. You might be doing a systematic literature review or meta-analysis – again, you’ll need to do a good PubMed search that identifies the right studies. Thanks to BMC !!! ----------------------------- This video was sponsored by BMC – (click here to go to BMC: https://goo.gl/RFaUA2 ). As a pioneer of open access publishing, BMC has an evolving portfolio of high-quality peer-reviewed journals including broad interest titles such as BMC Biology and BMC Medicine, specialist journals such as Malaria Journal and Microbiome, and the BMC series. BMC is committed to continual innovation to better support the needs of research communities, ensuring the integrity of the research we publish, and championing the benefits of open research. BMC is part of Springer Nature, giving us greater opportunities to help authors connect and advance discoveries across the world. I’m particularly excited about having BMC’s support because I’ve been working with them for nearly 15 years as the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Globalization and Health. I’ve been extremely impressed by them as a company that has integrity and that is truly making the world a better place. LEARN MORE about literature reviews ------------------------------------------------------------ Of course, there is more to a literature review than just the search. You need to have a structured approach to selecting paper, extracting data, writing the review itself and creating a bibliography. For more detail on these aspects of a literature review, go to www.learnmore365.com where I have a full course on literature review (it takes about 30 minutes to complete). About this channel ------------------------------ This channel posts global health and public health teaching videos and videos about how to find the right job in global health. If you haven't already, please consider subscribing to this channel and becoming part of this community. SUBSCRIBE: -------------------- Click here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=YourChannelNameHere LETS CONNECT: --------------------------- Twitter: @drgregmartin Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drgregmartin/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisweekinglobalhealth/ SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL ----------------------------------------- Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/drgregmartin
Research Article Types and How to Read Them
 
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Describes the basic research article types and how to read original research articles as a student and beginner researcher
Views: 138 Dr. Dan Kuchinka
What are systematic reviews?
 
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Summary: This video explains why systematic reviews are important and how they are done. This includes an explanation of how the effects of interventions are compared in order to provide evidence. Attribution/credits: Prepared by the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group, La Trobe University and generously support by Cochrane Australia. Written by Jack Nunn and Sophie Hill. cccrg.cochrane.org. Animation by Shakira Moss, Doodler Animation - doodler.com.au
Views: 122938 Cochrane
Types of Review Articles (spring 2018)
 
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https://www.brainshark.com/uml/vu?pi=zGCz15i8Apz85IJz0 -
Writing Review Articles
 
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A short video on writing review articles
Views: 1977 Randy Danielsen
types of academic papers
 
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The overwhelming number of ever-increasing publishers and journals, makes it necessary to find the most suitable journal according to the scientific level of our study. If you do this step correctly, you will find yourself very much closer to publishing an effective article or paper. Various factors are considered for such a purpose. These factors include but are not limited to: acceptance rate of articles in that journal, the review period of the article, the printing period, etc. This makes it hard indeed to find the best journal. Find out how to gather all the information you need and how to make a decision on where to consider publishing in.
Epi #4 - Types of Research Articles
 
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How to Learn Scientific Research? A Guide for Medical Students & Residents! In these episodes, I am trying to explain a series of lessons I learned during my career in medical research that I hope someone may find useful. The purpose of these episodes is to encourage young students and graduates to pursue their maximal potential and achieve their dreams confidently. It helps to know that someone like you, even with way less advantages was able to do the same. This means you can do the same as well.
Views: 1622 Nizar Saleh, MD
2.3 Let's Write: First Lines and Literature Review Of Research Thesis
 
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If you are having troubles with your research paper, I might have a solution for you. My full course "Research Methods for Business Students" is available on Udemy. Here you can also submit YOUR questions to me and receive FEEDBACK ON YOUR PAPER! As you are my students, the course is only for 9.99 USD with following link: https://www.udemy.com/research-methods-for-business-students/?couponCode=RESEARCH_METHODS_1
Views: 215993 MeanThat
How to Write Literature Review for Research Paper
 
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Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: 1. Gather the summaries of your sources. 2. Put the summaries in groups based on theme. 3. Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see:https://www.researchgate.net/publication/281226327_Marathi_Speech_Synthesis_A_review please Subscribe! like and comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: For more knowledge subscribe to Research Rocks: https://www.youtube.com/c/ResearchRocks?sub_confirmation=1 Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOUNy2ormHvqEYP3m-aiaGA Github: https://github.com/Sangramsingkayte Google Scholar : https://scholar.google.co.in/citations?user=8HFQffYAAAAJ&hl=en Research Get: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Sangramsing_Kayte5 Twitter: https://twitter.com/bsangramsing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sangramsing Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sangramsing_official/ LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/drsangramsingkayte/ Slideshare: https://www.slideshare.net/sangramsingRajput1 My one Website :- sangramsing.com
Views: 37693 Research Rocks
Finding online sources for your research paper
 
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This video explains how to use google scholar to find research papers to use as the background of your experiment and as sources in your paper. Table of Contents: 00:08 - Types of sources 01:45 - Google Scholar 03:10 - Dowloading PDFs 04:10 - Using reference lists 05:25 - Using the "cited by" link 06:20 - Refining your search terms and using operators 07:50 - Using Wikipedia 08:55 - Using Science Daily
Views: 119100 Steve Kirk
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
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"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 629613 David Taylor
How Do I Choose the Best Journal for My Paper?
 
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HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST JOURNAL FOR MY PAPER? Which journal is the best one in scholarly publishing for my paper? This video lists the decision points when making this decision. MORE VIDEOS on Choosing Which Journal to Publish Your Article https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jkGjy26P2tVNragL2ik0c2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: How do I decide the best journal for my paper? Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to be discussing how to choose a scholarly journal for you to submit your paper to. A bit about me: I’ve been in scholarly publishing for over 25 year and as Chief Content Officer for a major medical publisher oversaw the publishing of over 20,000 peer reviewed articles. So, you have collected your data and information or completed your study. You have written your paper. Now what? Prior to deciding, make sure you have had the paper read and critiqued by your colleagues and associates. Consider very carefully their feedback and make the changes where you see fit. Remember to give it one more very close check for grammar, spelling, format and style before moving on. Now you are ready. In starting to consider where to submit your paper, create a chart or list of the options under consideration. Include the journals you read and receive; and the ones you respect. Ask your co-workers and colleagues what journals best fit the topic of your paper and have them weigh in on their opinions on the publications. In your chart, list these journal names and their urls. Most journal website will have an About section that will list the Mission or Aims and Scope of the publication. Read them and see if they align with your content and article format. Add to the chart the journal’s frequency; that is monthly, bimonthly, quarterly. Closely review the Information for Authors published for each Journal, likely at their website. This is the best guide to see if your article is a fit and will save everyone time. Read it very closely. Not just their mission but also the specifications for format and types of articles that are interested in. Also, if a journal has an Impact Factor, it may be listed at their website. If not, sometimes searching the web for that journal’s current Impact Factor will give you an answer. List whether the journal is subscription based, or sent to members of a Society, or an Open Access publication. Sometimes a journal may be more than one of these. If it is Open Access, check out the APC or Author Processing Charge and include the amount, if any. The more widely the journal is available, for example an Open Access publication, the more your article will get downloaded and read. Next check on where the journal is indexed. For instance, in medicine or nursing, being included in Medline or CINAHL are essential. Check for your area of specialty to see if the journal is covered in your key abstracting and indexing service. Once again, go the website and ensure articles are included online in addition to in the paper version of the journal. Are they posted online at acceptance or only when a print version appears? What may be listed at a website is the average time a paper takes to get from submission to decision and then the time it takes to get from acceptance to being published. If your topic has a sense of urgency to it, this time can be a critical decision. These times may not be publicly available. On occasion, the acceptance rate or rejection rate from the previous year may be listed. This would be a key piece of data as well. Search your topic over at a journal’s website to see if they have published any articles on it over the past two years. Most journals are looking for new or novel takes on existing topics and you might want to see what they have recently published. Finally, submit to just one journal at a time. I know it is tempting to reduce the wait time and send out to many journals or publications, but etiquette (and ethics) demand one at a time only.....
Views: 15852 John Bond
Intro to Systematic Reviews & Meta-Analyses
 
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Here's a brief introduction to how to evaluate systematic reviews.
Views: 182525 Rahul Patwari
Identifying Article Types
 
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This video discusses the differences between popular magazines, trade publications, and scholarly journals. Created by Amanda Howell, Reference & Instruction Librarian. Music: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music
Views: 2557 Amanda Howell
Editing: Things they don't tell you about what journal editors want
 
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Pippa Smart, independent publishing and research communications consultant and Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Learned Publishing, provides some insights into the ‘black box’ of editorial decision-making and how authors can improve their chances of article acceptance. Recorded 6 July 2016 at a MedComms Networking event in Oxford. Produced by NetworkPharma.tv = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ABSTRACT: Many authors are mystified both by the time it takes to publish work, and by the reasons for its being rejected or accepted only subject to revisions. The process of publication is actually straightforward. Following initial checks for completeness, suitability and plagiarism, high-impact journals tend to reject 70% or more of papers immediately, i.e. within a week or so, while those with less strict criteria will reject at least 30% of submissions. The commonest reasons are that the work is out of scope of the journal, or the quality is insufficient for a variety of reasons, from lack of originality, to flawed science and poor quality writing or overall structure. The review process is generally very time-consuming. It is standard practice to have three reviewers per article; one or two may be suggested by the authors, though not necessarily accepted. Recruiting these reviewers may require eight or more invitations. An editor will normally allow two weeks for review; however, deadlines are frequently missed, and the reviews received may be contradictory or unhelpful, necessitating a further round of reviewer recruitment or sometimes arbitration by an additional reviewer. Acceptance without changes following review is rare; the most common decision by an editor is to request revisions, which may be minor or major. Authors can greatly improve their chances of acceptance by carefully reading journal author guidelines, checking journal scopes to ensure that they submit to a suitable journal, and submitting good quality work. A good article will be attractive to a journal editor, communicate its message clearly and concisely, and encourage citation. Written by Penny Gray, Freelance Medical Writer = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = We are building a library of free webcasts, like this one, for the global MedComms Community and others at http://www.networkpharma.tv and we’d welcome your suggestions for new topics and speakers. Full details of this MedComms Networking event are at http://medcommsnetworking.com/event75.html Pippa’s presentation (PDF format) is at http://medcommsnetworking.com/presentations/smart_02_060716.pdf Pippa’s Linkedin page is at https://www.linkedin.com/in/pippa-smart-2b6b2a2/ More about PSP Consulting can be found at http://www.pspconsulting.org Filming and technical direction by Mario Crispino, Freelance Cameraman & Editor [For the avoidance of doubt: this video is intended to be freely accessible to all. Please feel free to share and use however you like. Cheers Peter Llewellyn, Director NetworkPharma Ltd and Founder of the MedComms Networking Community activity at http://www.medcommsnetworking.com]
Views: 15886 MedComms
Types Of Research Paper.
 
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Type according to the research field: Divided from the research field, it can be divided into social science papers and natural science papers. Social science papers are mainly papers that describe the complex phenomena of society, explain the laws of social development, analyze and solve social problems and actively carry out scientific research. Natural science papers are mainly articles that describe natural phenomena, explain natural development changes, analyze and solve problems in the development of natural sciences, and conduct active research, and publish their own opinions and opinions. https://customwriting.com/ will help you to write research paper online.
Views: 31 Research Paper
Peer reviewed articles
 
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This video explains how to identify and find peer reviewed articles.
Views: 552 UQ Library
Writing scientific papers: 2 Types of paper
 
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Part of a one-day training course in research skills for researchers at Faculties of Agriculture in Serbia, given as part of the Tempus project 'Building Capacity of Serbian Agricultural Education to Link with Society' (CaSA). Course held at University of Novi Sad, Serbia on 11 May 2014. The full training course will be available on the CaSA website (http://casa.polj.uns.ac.rs). Part 2 of 9 on scientific writing.
Views: 4791 Steve Quarrie
Peer Review in 3 Minutes
 
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How do articles get peer reviewed? What role does peer review play in scholarly research and publication? This video will explain. This video is published under a Creative Commons 3.0 BY-NC-SA US license. License, credits, and contact information can be found here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/peerreview/ Feel free to link to / embed our videos!
Views: 280461 libncsu
Research Questions Hypothesis and Variables
 
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This lesson discusses the relationships of research questions, hypothesis, and variables in a research study proposal. Dr. Wallace is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at American Military University.
Views: 188280 Ron Wallace
Research Methods - Introduction
 
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In this video, Dr Greg Martin provides an introduction to research methods, methedology and study design. Specifically he takes a look at qualitative and quantitative research methods including case control studies, cohort studies, observational research etc. Global health (and public health) is truly multidisciplinary and leans on epidemiology, health economics, health policy, statistics, ethics, demography.... the list goes on and on. This YouTube channel is here to provide you with some teaching and information on these topics. I've also posted some videos on how to find work in the global health space and how to raise money or get a grant for your projects. Please feel free to leave comments and questions - I'll respond to all of them (we'll, I'll try to at least). Feel free to make suggestions as to future content for the channel. SUPPORT: —————- This channel has a crowd-funding campaign (please support if you find these videos useful). Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_support OTHER USEFUL LINKS: ———————— Channel page: http://bit.ly/GH_channel Subscribe: http://bit.ly/GH_subscribe Google+: http://bit.ly/GH_Google Twitter: @drgregmartin Facebook: http://bit.ly/GH_facebook HERE ARE SOME PLAYLISTS ——————————————- Finding work in Global Health: http://bit.ly/GH_working Epidemiology: http://bit.ly/GH_epi Global Health Ethics: http://bit.ly/GH_ethics Global Health Facts: http://bit.ly/GH_facts WANT CAREER ADVICE? ———————————— You can book time with Dr Greg Martin via Google Helpouts to get advice about finding work in the global health space. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_career -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Know how interpret an epidemic curve?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SM4PN7Yg1s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Writing the Literature Review (Part One): Step-by-Step Tutorial for Graduate Students
 
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Take the mystery out of this academic assignment. All you do is: (1) Gather the summaries of your sources. (2) Put the summaries in groups based on theme. (4) Write a paragraph on each group of sources with transitions between each source. 4. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs. You're done! For examples of previously written literature reviews, see: http://libguides.uwf.edu/c.php?g=215199&p=1420828
Views: 1137038 David Taylor
PubMed: Finding primary research and review articles
 
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Using PubMed to find primary research articles and review articles.
Views: 25228 gersteinlibrary
Research Writing - Literature Review
 
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Literature Review is one of the most important part in process of research writing. This video will help to understand the process of literature review and its importance. Feel free to write if you have any suggestion. Thanks DP Tripathi
Views: 436 Librarian Guide
Paraphrasing:  The Basic Steps
 
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It is a necessary academic skill to paraphrase ideas when writing and reading. This video gives two examples of how to paraphrase.
Views: 530716 DiveIn Learning
How to Write, Format and Publish your Research Article
 
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Visit our website http://www.pub4sure.com Please read "easy to learn and write" blogs on how to format your manuscripts at www.pub4sure.com/blog KEYWORDS FOR YOUR RESEARCH ARTICLE Tips to Write the INTRODUCTION for your Research Article Tips on Writing a Good Research Paper Title How to Write References in your Research Paper Why Publish Your Scientific Work In A Peer Reviewed Journal? How to Write an Effective Case Report for a Journal? Why is your research paper rejected by the journal? Tips: How to Write an Abstract for your Article Did you know getting your manuscript published in a journal of good impact factor will increase your chances of getting a JOB, PROMOTION and RESPECT in your profession? What are you waiting for? We help you get published with easy to fill templates [www.pub4sure.com Register FREE] Simple steps, and use of templates will help you format your research article, case report, thesis, dissertation, review article, clinical trial results. We help you get published Register FREE at www.pub4sure.com Beat your peers in the race to professional SUCCESS. We help you get ahead in the race by increasing your chances of getting PUBLISHED in a journal with good impact factor! APPLYING FOR US RESIDENCY??? If you are looking to get in to a good residency program in US or work in UK, Australia-New Zealand, getting publications in your CV will surely improve your chances in the race. Get started for FREE @ http://www.pub4sure.com/register-as-client/
Views: 4556 Pub4 Sure
Research Article (अनुसंधान  लेख) and Research Paper (शोध पत्र) #researcharticle
 
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Research Aptitude- Waht is Research article and what is Difference between Research Article vs Research Paper
Views: 881 Educational By Arun
The Research Process:  The Literature Review
 
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http://thedoctoraljourney.com/ This video defines the literature review and describes the literature review process. For more statistics, research and SPSS tools, visit http://thedoctoraljourney.com/.
Views: 21648 The Doctoral Journey
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 1946339 Veritasium
Overview of Systematic Review and Research Synthesis
 
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KTDRR and Campbell Collaboration Research Evidence Training: Overview of Systematic Review and Research Synthesis The KTDRR Center and the international Campbell Collaboration are working together to offer a five-part training course that focuses on high-quality methods for synthesis of evidence, including the procedures and methods for conducting systematic reviews/research syntheses (SR/RS) as well as software, tools, and strategies for analyzing and reporting data. The training materials are developed by representatives of the Campbell Collaboration. Online resources from various national and international organizations will be provided for each session. The first session, an Overview of Systematic Review and Research Synthesis, describes the benefits of evidence from SR, different types of reviews and differences between SR and RS, introduces organizations supporting and conducting SR/RS, and ends with the basic steps in SR/RS. This webcast was developed in collaboration with the KTER Center’s Employment Research Outreach Team (EROT). KTER’s EROT consists of knowledge translation and research staff from NIDILRR-funded projects who work in disability and employment research. This team collaborates with KTER Center staff to identify the pressing needs of fellow NIDILRR grantees in the employment portfolio. The KTER’s EROT determined that it is important for NIDILRR grantees to measure project outcomes, demonstrate use of our work, and promote projects’ sustainability after our funding ends. For more information go to http://ktdrr.org/training/webcasts/webcast65/index.html
Views: 119 KTDRR and KTER
Extracting Data for Meta-Analysis: Step 1
 
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How to locate the outcomes of interest in different types of research articles Table of Contents: 00:00 - Data Extraction for Meta-Analysis 00:14 - 00:51 - 01:25 - 01:38 - 01:49 - Marker 03:26 - 03:39 - 04:39 - 04:59 - 06:32 - 06:38 - 07:33 - 07:40 - 09:12 -
Views: 39778 Scott Parrott
15 Writing Apps to Help You Write Papers and Essays Faster - College Info Geek
 
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If you want to beat writer's block, plan your papers better, manage research, or just increase your writing motivation, these apps and sites should help. LINKS TO ALL THE APPS: http://collegeinfogeek.com/writing-apps-and-websites/ How I wrote my 27,000 word book (podcast episode): http://collegeinfogeek.com/how-i-wrote-a-book/ Speaking of that book, it's called "10 Steps to Earning Awesome Grades" and it's completely free, so check it out if you're interested in improving your grades! http://collegeinfogeek.com/get-better-grades/ ---------- Videos you might want to watch next: 20 Useful Websites Every Student Should Know About: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3O_Y5vb9Cg 5 Ways to Build Focus and Concentration: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-KCZ1sghLY ---------- If you want to get even more strategies and tips on becoming a more productive, successful student, subscribe to my channel right here: http://buff.ly/1vQP5ar Twitter ➔ https://twitter.com/tomfrankly Instagram ➔ https://instagram.com/tomfrankly ~ created by Thomas Frank
Views: 287007 Thomas Frank
How to write literature review (Hindi)
 
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Literature Review is art to present your topic from top to toe information of your topic. Chose a eye catching self explanatory title to your topic. Write a very brief well explained Abstract. Abstract should state whole story of your paper. Provide more information using table, chart, graph in less space. For English click on the given link https://youtu.be/l91Fj6PEjrE
Using APA style for references and citations
 
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This instructional video is designed for graduate students who are required to use APA formattting for research papers. Examples for reference entries and citations are fully explained.
Views: 795394 Ben Phillips
MVLRI Webinar: The Journal Article Review Process
 
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One provocateur and three discussants with a wide range of experiences with academic journals share insights on how the journal article review process unfolds.
Nursing: Defining Literature Reviews
 
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Designed for nursing students at NKU who are enrolled in nursing research courses. This video discusses the concept of a literature review and the types of sources used to support a literature review project -- Created using PowToon. This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/-
Views: 2294 Steely Library NKU
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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Recognize the structure of scholarly articles in order to use them most effectively in your research projects. With Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College librarian.
Quantitative Research Designs: Descriptive non-experimental, Quasi-experimental or Experimental?
 
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http://youstudynursing.com/ Get my research terminology eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Students often have difficulty classifying quantitative research designs. In quantitative research, designs can be classified into one of three categories: descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. To identify which of these designs your study is using follow the steps in this video. Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam **The PDF version of my book is better and is being approved by Google Play right now. For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://books.google.ca/books/about/Research_terminology_simplified.html?id=tLMRAgAAQBAJ&redir_esc=y Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA0-RMPi7qE&feature=share&list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam Students often have difficulty classifying quantitative research designs. In quantitative research, designs can be classified into one of three categories: descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. To identify which of these designs your study is using follow the steps in this video. First, ask yourself if the researchers did anything to the participants. More specifically, was there an intervention? ...If the answer is yes, there was an intervention, then the study is either a quasi-experimental or experimental. I will tell you how to decide in a moment. If the answer is no, the study is descriptive non-experimental. Sure, you could be more specific in the description of the design, but for the purposes of grouping your research in a literature review this label is often sufficient at an undergraduate level. Descriptive non-experimental studies may also be called observational. Some examples of more specific labels include case control, cohort and correlational studies. ... To find out if the design is experimental ask yourself if it is a randomized controlled trial. Randomized controlled trials are considered the gold standard or "best" possible design (in quantitative research). You may also hear randomized controlled trails referred to as true experiments. However, in the real world it is difficult to conduct a true randomized controlled trial in many situations, which means that a lot of studies are done that are not classified as randomized controlled trials. Randomized control trials have three key components: a random sample, a control group and an intervention. If your study is truly a randomized control trial it should say in the abstract and/or the methods section of the article. If it doesn't say then it is likely that the study is either descriptive non-experimental or quasi-experimental. You can tell the difference by looking into the methods section further. ...If there is no control group than the study is quasi-experimental. A control group is a group of people that enter the study but do not receive the intervention under study. Instead, they are used for the purpose of comparison. If the sample was not randomized properly or adequately or even at all then the study is also quasi-experimental. You may also see this type of study being called a non-randomized trial. ... Sometimes I see students that are confused about the study design because of terms that relate to the length of time the study was conducted or the sampling process. ... Terms like cross-sectional and longitudinal tell you how much time the study was conducted over. Cross sectional means that data were collected at one point in time. Longitudinal means that data were collected over a long period of time. These terms alone will not tell you if the study is descriptive non-experimental, quasi-experimental or experimental. If you use these words to describe your study design in the absence of one of the labels we discussed in this video you will not have given your teacher enough information about the study design to properly classify it. Other confusing terms often relate to the way samples were collected, like convenience sampling. Convenience sampling means that the sample was readily available or accessible to the researchers. This term will give you the hint that the study does not have a random sample and is therefore not a randomized controlled trial, but you still need to classify it further as descriptive non-experimental or quasi-experimental. To decide how to classify the design of a study you are looking at, follow the steps outlined in this video. Ask yourself the following three questions: Was there an intervention? Is there a control group? Was the sample random? ...
Views: 209092 NurseKillam
Scientific publication | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_literature 00:01:20 1 Types of scientific publications 00:04:08 1.1 Scientific papers and articles 00:06:18 2 Scientific article 00:06:29 2.1 Preparation 00:07:55 2.2 Language 00:09:01 2.3 Structure and style 00:12:50 3 Peer review 00:15:36 4 Ethics 00:19:09 5 History 00:19:44 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7929108098777717 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= For a broader class of literature, see Academic literature. Scientific literature comprises scholarly publications that report original empirical and theoretical work in the natural and social sciences, and within an academic field, often abbreviated as the literature. Academic publishing is the process of contributing the results of one's research into the literature, which often requires a peer-review process. Original scientific research published for the first time in scientific journals is called the primary literature. Patents and technical reports, for minor research results and engineering and design work (including computer software), can also be considered primary literature. Secondary sources include review articles (which summarize the findings of published studies to highlight advances and new lines of research) and books (for large projects or broad arguments, including compilations of articles). Tertiary sources might include encyclopedias and similar works intended for broad public consumption.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Pico Question||NURSING PICO QUESTION
 
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Pico Question Iowa model Search Methodology Research Articles Review Matrix Peer-Reviewed Articles on the Subject type: Article critique Subject: Nursing Academic level: Undergraduate Style: APA Instructions for Synthesis Paper Step 1: Compose your PICO question; this should be a question that is relevant to nursing. Step 2: Do a review of literature to identify research articles related to your topic. They should be current (within the last 10 years). Select a minimum of 5 (maximum of 10) RESEARCH articles (quantitative or qualitative). You can include articles you have already critiqued if they relate to your PICO question but they must be in addition to the required 5 articles. It is OK to use mix method studies, meta analysis and/or meta synthesis for this assignment (see ch. 27). Step 3: Complete the matrix (format is included in the resource folder) on the research articles you have selected to include in your paper. It is OK to add columns to your matrix if you find that helps you organize your information. The matrix is your working tool – it is what you will then use to write your paper. Step 4: Write your evidence based paper consisting of: • Introduction that addresses the theoretical model you selected (Iowa model or Stetler model); your clinical question and rationale for why it is relevant. • Search Methodology - a short explanation of how you conducted your search (databases used; parameters; search terms) • Synthesis of findings (literature review); this is where you identify themes across the studies; critically analyze and summarize the findings. Using either Evans or the evidence hierarchy in your text, address the overall level of research you found. • Conclusion(s) – do you have enough information to answer your question; what is your next step using your model • References – correct APA citations and grammar. • Maximum length of your paper is 5 pages (excluding cover sheet and references). * Five pages for the paper and 2 pages for matrix essays essay writing help writing essays college essay online essays essay papers essay writing help writing essays research paper help college term papers english essays research paper writing writing term papers term paper help free essays plagiarism how to write an essay report writing proofreading free essay nursing degree life insurance business class travel cheap business class airfares cheap business class airfare massage therapy forex trading internet business summercamps medical insurance teen summer camp detective executive coach limo florida home school summer camp programs sales training day care software college grants computer technology mailing list advertising