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Plan B -- is there an alternative to economic growth?: Miklós Antal at TEDxDanubia 2014
 
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Miklós Antal, ecological economist, is a postdoctoral researcher at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. He now studies macroeconomic aspects of sustainability transitions. Previously he was engaged in energy modeling at the Central European University in Budapest. He got his PhD in economics and MSc in engineering-physics at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics. His multidisciplinary research interests are reflected by a number of publications in respected scientific journals, both in natural and social sciences. His commitment to sustainability is not restricted to academic life, he is the scientist who also "walks the talk": his cell phone was hip ten years ago, he avoids flying (which can be a challenging principle to follow at times) and actively encourages his environment to explore the joys of green living. Antal Miklós a Barcelonai Autonóm Egyetem posztdoktori ösztöndíjas kutatója. Jelenleg a környezeti fenntarthatóság makroökonómiai aspektusait vizsgálja. Ezt megelőzően energetikai modellezéssel foglalkozott a Közép-Európai Egyetemen. Gazdaságtudományi doktoriját és mérnök-fizikus diplomáját a Budapesti Műszaki és Gazdaságtudományi Egyetemen szerezte. Széleskörű érdeklődését jelzi, hogy mind társadalomtudományi, mind természettudományi területen számos cikke jelent meg rangos nemzetközi folyóiratokban. Ő az a kutató, aki nem csak elméletben éli meg a fenntarthatóságot, hanem mindennapjaiba is beépíti azt: mostani telefonja 10 éve volt menő, nem repül (ami a nemzetközi munka kapcsán jelent némi kihívást), és igyekszik a környezetében lévő embereknek a „zöld" életforma érdekes és élvezetes aspektusait megmutatni. In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 26002 TEDx Talks
Private Regulation as an Alternative to Government Regulation | With Ziad K. Abdelnour
 
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Financial Policy Council - November 18, 2013 Keynote Speaker: Dr. Edward Stringham Event Chairman: Ziad K. Abdelnour, Chairman Financial Policy Council As Founder and Chairman of the Financial Policy Council, Ziad K. Abdelnour is also a Wall Street Financier, Author, Philanthropist, Activist, Lobbyist, Oil & Gas Trader & President & CEO of Blackhawk Partners, Inc. The mission of the Financial Policy Council Inc. (FPC), a research think tank and educational institution, is to formulate and promote sound public policy based on the principles of free enterprise and wealth creation as envisioned by the ideals of the American Founding Fathers. Our goal is to ensure that America, the land of opportunity where freedom and prosperity have flourished, is not derailed by poorly formulated and reactive economic, fiscal and tax policy. In addition, our goal is to retain and reclaim America's leading role in the global economic community. All-Star Cast of Investing Experts at the Global Financial Summit 2016 Videos: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FMbWbfG8ys https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cx6mMTjpt9A https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAcfe0gNJCU
Professor Martin Lodge -- MSc Regulation
 
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Professor Martin Lodge, convenor of the MSc in Regulation at LSE, provides an overview of the programme.
There's No Such Thing As An Unregulated Market
 
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We all want the safety and dependable quality that “regulation” is supposed to provide. Government can provide it to some extent, but markets can do it better, if we let them. Howard Baetjer of Towson University explains. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: The Most Dangerous Monopoly: When Caution Kills (video): All of us want assurance that the things we buy are safe. What’s the best way to get it? Howard Baetjer of Towson University explains that when products undergo third-party certification processes to determine their safety, market forces are able to optimize the amount of testing conducted and consumers can use the information provided by certification firms to make their own decisions. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DvxT7fryE3Q Free Market Economics: Uber, Airbnb, & Feastly vs Government Regulation (video): The sharing economy connects people with services like Uber, AirBnB, and Feastly. Despite these new ways to connect, many regulators would like to stop it in its tracks. Chris Koopman explains why this approach to regulation is becoming increasingly irrelevant. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvsPXKJe05Q How Food Regulations Make Us Less Healthy (video): Why do we consume so much high fructose corn syrup? Why does America suffer from an obesity epidemic? And why are fruits and vegetables so expensive? Prof. Dan D'Amico argues that government regulations designed to serve special interests are partly to blame. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv-6YpUzQdA TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/theres-no-such-thing-as-an-unregulated-market/ LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 18087 Learn Liberty
Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14
 
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We talk a lot about Keynesian economics on this show, pretty much because the real world currently runs on Keynesian principles. That said, there are some other economic ideas out there, and today we're going to talk about a few of them. So, if you've been aching to hear about socialism, communism, the Chicago School, or the Austrian School, this episode is for you. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 890179 CrashCourse
The Danger of Regulatory Capture
 
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Regulatory capture occurs when regulatory agencies become dominated by the very industries they were charged with regulating, prompting regulators to advance the goals and interests of those industries. While regulation is necessary and can be done well, it must always be balanced against the potential for unintended consequences that harm the consumers it is intended to protect. For more information, visit the PolicyEd page here: https://www.policyed.org/intellections/danger-regulatory-capture/video Additional resources: Read John B. Taylor’s blog on “Regulatory Capture and Reckless Endangerment,” available here: https://bit.ly/2NpmuHs Read “Free the Captives” in which Gary S. Becker discusses regulatory capture. Available here: https://hvr.co/2BXCWwz In “A Comparison of Government Regulation of Risk in the Financial Services and Nuclear Power Industries,” John B. Taylor and Frank A. Wolak examine and compare the problem of safety and soundness regulation in two industries that have dominated the headlines in recent years—nuclear power and financial services. Available here: https://hvr.co/2QzCyIP Read John B. Taylor’s keynote address, “Simple Rules for Financial Stability.” Available here: https://hvr.co/2ICk1Zq Read John B. Taylor’s testimony before the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the United States House of Representatives Financial Services Committee, available here: https://hvr.co/2IHWvuc Visit https://www.policyed.org/ to learn more. - Subscribe to PolicyEd's YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdSub - Follow PolicyEd on Twitter: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdTwit - Follow PolicyEd on Instagram: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdInsta
Views: 486550 PolicyEd
Regulation and Market Structure from ATS to NMS
 
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Recorded June 1, 2018. Discussion between moderator Dr. Ken Durr and 3 former directors of SEC's Division of Trading and Markets: Richard G. Ketchum, division director from 1984 - 1990 Dr. Richard R. Lindsey, division director from 1995 - 1998 Commissioner Annette Nazareth, division director from 1999 - 2005 The program will be part of the Market Structure Gallery, opening in December 2018. The panel will examine the reshaping of the equities markets from the mid-1990s to mid-2000s, from Reg ATS (Alternative Trading System) through Reg NMS (National Market System), distinguishing, as best they can, the role of regulation, market innovation, and chance, in driving these changes.
Economic Freedom by the Numbers
 
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What’s the evidence that economic freedom is beneficial for society? Prof. Antony Davies shows charts of the free market’s effects on unemployment, inequality, poverty, and even child labor. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Who Needs Economic Freedom When You Can Vote? (video): In this clip, Prof. Jason Brennan explains why economic freedoms should matter as much as political freedoms. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgCw0kn_m8U Economic Freedom and a Better Life (video): Prof. Josh Hall explains how economic freedom leads to greater human well-being. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dH5VDZY2H28 Economic Vs. Civil Liberties (video): Which are more important, economic liberties or civil liberties? To Prof. Aeon Skoble, this distinction is fictitious. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWAyEzyp2xQ TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/economic-freedom-by-the-numbers/ LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 42126 Learn Liberty
What If There Were No Prices? The Railroad Thought Experiment
 
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What if there were no prices? How would you use available resources? To appreciate why market prices are essential to human well-being, consider what a fix we would be in without them. Suppose you were the commissar of railroads in the old Soviet Union. Markets and prices have been banished. You and your comrades. Passionate communists all. Now, directly plan how to use available resources. You want a railroad from city A to city B, but between the cities is a mountain range. Suppose somehow you know that the railroad once built. Will serve the nation equally well. Whether it goes through the mountains or around. If you build through the mountains, you'll use much less steel for the tracks. Because that route is shorter. But you'll use a great deal of engineering to design the trestles and tunnels needed to cross the rough terrain. That matters because engineering is also needed to design irrigation systems, mines, harbor installations and other structures. And you don't want to tie up engineering on your railroad if it would be more valuable designing those other structures instead. You can save engineering for other projects. If you build around the mountains on level ground. But that way you'll use much more steel rail to go the longer distance and steel is also needed for other purposes. For vehicles, girders, ships, pots and pans and thousands of other things. Which route should you choose for the good of the nation? To answer, you would need to determine which bundle of resources is less urgently needed for other purposes. The large amount of engineering and small amount of steel for the route through the mountains, where the small amount of engineering and large amount of steel for the roundabout route. But how could you find out the urgency of need for engineering and steel in other uses? Find out more as Professor Howard Baetjer Jr. from Towson University explains market prices through the railroad thought experiment. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/1HVAtKP FOLLOW US: - Website: https://www.learnliberty.org/ - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnLiberty - Twitter: https://twitter.com/LearnLiberty - Google +: http://bit.ly/1hi66Zz LEARN MORE: -The Essential Hayek (website): A project of The Fraser Institute, serving as a resource for the life and works of Freidrich Hayek. http://www.essentialhayek.org/ -“What Do Prices ‘Know’ That You Don’t?” (video): Professor Mike Munger explains how prices convey knowledge about scarcity and need. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPy-QKXofQs LEARN LIBERTY Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://bit.ly/1UleLbP
Views: 121043 Learn Liberty
Public Choice Theory: Why Government Often Fails
 
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Governments don’t work the way most people think they do. Public choice theory explores how voters, politicians, and bureaucrats actually make decisions. Prof. Antony Davies explains. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: Behavioral Economics Ep. 5: What You Need to Know About Public Choice (video): Erika Davies and Prof. Antony Davies give an introduction to public choice economics and describe how insights on human behavior in the private sector can be applied to predict human behavior in the public sector. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FcLGUHXz78I Public Choice: Why Politicians Don't Cut Spending (video): Prof. Ben Powell uses insights from public choice theory to explain why politicians, despite what they may promise to voters, rarely cut government spending. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uR4lqa7IK4 Schools of Thought in Classical Liberalism, Part 3: Public Choice (video): Dr. Nigel Ashford gives a brief overview of the intellectual figures and ideas associated with public choice theory; part of a larger series on schools of thought in the classical liberal tradition. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffJFNEujeL4 TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: http://www.learnliberty.org/videos/public-choice-theory-why-government-often-fails/ LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 173898 Learn Liberty
What's wrong with the American economy?
 
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Recorded on September 8, 2016 The American economy’s biggest problem is growth. To achieve growth, Hoover Institution fellow John Cochrane argues, America needs to simplify the tax code and deregulate the economy. He discusses how government agencies must conduct serious, transparent, and retrospective cost-benefit analyses, get rid of special interests, and remove disincentives if they want businesses to flourish. Cochrane notes that the US economy needs more innovation, deep tax reform, and better regulations to unleash growth. When business owners can depend on good policy and not pay for play, they will start and invest in their companies and the economy will expand. Cochrane discusses the future of American economic growth and how he believes it can be fixed. Cochrane encourages us to have more faith in democracy because if the right policies are put in place the economy will quickly improve and everyone will be better off. According to Cochrane, "America needs better policy and governance under the rule of law." He also discusses the benefits of lowering and even ending corporate taxes to reduce price inflation and outsourcing jobs overseas. Cochrane points out that the ability to bring people together to get good bills through is what a great politician like Lincoln did; it is hoped that the next president will do this. Robinson and Cochrane further debate technological innovation, the role of robots in the economy, and whether Americans need to be concerned about robots taking over our jobs. Interested in exclusive Uncommon Knowledge content? Check out Uncommon Knowledge on social media! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UncKnowledge/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/UncKnowledge/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/uncommon_knowledge_show
Views: 40980 HooverInstitution
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 322164 CrashCourse
Investment Banker Ken Moelis On Taxes, Regulation & Attracting Top Talent | Davos 2019
 
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Ken Moelis has been in the investment banking industry for over 30 years and is the founder and CEO of investment bank Moelis & Company. Moelis sat down with Business Insider's Sara Silverstein at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland to discuss taxes, regulation, and how to attract top talent. MORE DAVOS 2019 CONTENT: Business Leaders Discuss Technology's Role In Better Capitalism | Davos 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqvrhnUd_rI A $736 Billion Investor Says The Market Is Predicting An Economic Slowdown | Davos 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svOkomY9s_Y Wall Street Weighs In On AOC's Proposed 70% Marginal Tax Hike | Davos 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rs2mQxiZf_k ------------------------------------------------------ #Taxes #Davos #BusinessInsider Business Insider tells you all you need to know about business, finance, tech, retail, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: https://read.bi/7XqUHI BI on Facebook: https://read.bi/2xOcEcj BI on Instagram: https://read.bi/2Q2D29T BI on Twitter: https://read.bi/2xCnzGF -------------------------------------------------- Investment Banker Ken Moelis On Taxes, Regulation & Attracting Top Talent | Davos 2019
Views: 4903 Business Insider
Opportunity Costs: The Parable of the Broken Window - Learn Liberty
 
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Some people argue that natural disasters and other acts of destruction create wealth and employment as we repair the damage they’ve caused. Professor Dan Russell explains that this fallacy fails to take into “opportunity costs” into consideration. Whenever we use a resource for one purpose, like fixing a window, we give up the opportunity to use that resource for another purpose. We only know if the use of a resource has created value if we compare it with the the alternate uses we had to forego. forego. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: The Broken Window Fallacy (video): Art Carden explains the broken window fallacy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erJEaFpS9ls Louisiana Floods Reveal Age Old Broken Window Fallacy (blog article): Don Boudreaux explains how many fell for the broken window fallacy in response to the recent flooding in Louisiana http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/louisiana-floods-reveal-age-old-broken-window-fallacy/ How a 19th century French pamphleteer preempted two centuries of economic fallacies (blog article): Christopher Todd Meredith explains Frederic Bastiat’s contributions to economics and political science, including the broken window fallacy http://www.learnliberty.org/blog/how-a-19th-century-french-pamphleteer-preempted-two-centuries-of-economic-fallacies/ TRANSCRIPT: The full transcript can be found at http://www.learnliberty.org/?p=8503
Views: 21706 Learn Liberty
Monopolies and Anti-Competitive Markets: Crash Course Economics #25
 
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What is a monopoly? It turns out, it's more than just a board game. It's a terrible, terrible economic practice in which giant corporations dominate markets and hurt consumers. Except when it isn't. In some industries, monopolies are the most efficient way to do business. Utilities like electricity, water, and broadband internet access are probably less efficiently delivered in competitive markets. Come along, and let us monopolize your attention for a few minutes. You might learn something. And you might land on Free Parking. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 523905 CrashCourse
How the ‘sharing economy’ disrupts civilization | Ed Ericson Jr. | TEDxBaltimore
 
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How the ‘sharing economy’ disrupts civilization - Ed challenges the foundation of the so-called sharing economy. Ed is a staff writer at the Baltimore City Paper. In 2012 his received 1st Place for Economic Inequality Reporting from the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 33098 TEDx Talks
Government Regulation Stifles Innovation
 
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If you're interested in licensing this or any other Big Think clip for commercial or private use, contact our licensing partner Executive Interviews: https://www.executiveinterviews.biz/contact-us/americas/ There has been lots of innovation recently in areas without regulation—heavily regulated fields like transportation, health care, and energy have been much slower to progress. Question: Will technology reshape capitalism in the future? Peter Thiel: Technology and capitalism are very much linked.  I would frame the link a little differently.  I think that capitalism probably works best in a technologically progressing society.  In the developed world, technological progress means that you can have a situation where -- where people -- where there's growth, where there's a way in which everybody can be better off over time. If you have technological progress, that will encourage more capitalist system.  On the other hand, if you don't, if things are stalled, you end up with much more of a zero sum type thing, where there's no progress and basically everybody's gain is somebody else's loss.  And that, I think, tends to encourage a much less capitalist system, and that's where you sort of get a you know, what are often called a bull market in politics, but politics becomes more important, people become more interested in using the government to get things for their particular interest group and the whole thing can sort of spiral downwards instead of -- and become a vicious cycle where more government regulation leads to less technology, leads to demand for even more politics to redistribute the pie that's no longer growing. We have seen technological progress in the last few decades in computers, the internet, and we've seen a lot less in areas like transportation.  So you know the fastest airplanes was the Concord in 1970 they've gotten slower over the last 40 years.  Medicine, healthcare has seen some progress but it's been pretty limited the last 20 years where the development of new drugs and treatment seems to be badly stalled.  Energy is an area where there's been very limited progress and the actual cost of oil was $3.00 a barrel in 1973, and today it's around $85 a barrel, even inflation adjusted, the real prices have gone up because somehow we have not been making enough progress in developing the technologies for alternative and cheaper types of energy.  As a Libertarian, I tend to think it's interesting at least that a lot of these sectors correlate with places where there's heavy government regulation.  A government is not regulated -- the computer industry where the internet they thought that, you know, Bill Gates working with his computer in his parent's garage was not a really interesting or important thing, not worthy of scrutiny or regulation.  It didn't matter.  That's been the same perspective people had, by and large had with respect to the internet since the mid-90's and so we've had a lot of progress and innovation there. Health care on the other had has been subject to massive regulation and strangely had the most progress in some ways where you have cheaper treatments at better quality in things like cosmetic surgery and things like that which are less regulated and again deemed to be unimportant by the government.  So I think the regulatory load on technology has gotten to be quite high and there is this very important question of how much progress we're likely to see in the next few decades. From my perspective, the critical thing is actually to figure out a way to get the technology engine restarted.  I think that we would like to have less government regulations to enable that.  And if it gets restarted, you can have a more capitalist-type system.  But I do think that if technology is stalled out, we will probably see at some point a resumption of the trend toward more government even though it's more unlikely, in my opinion, to fix things. Recorded November 15, 2010Interviewed by Victoria Brown Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler
Views: 2343 Big Think
The Costs and Benefits of Monopoly
 
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In this video, we explore the costs and benefits of monopolies. We cover how monopolies and patents breed deadweight loss, market inefficiencies, and corruption. But we also look at what would happen if we eliminated patents for industries with high R&D costs, such as the pharmaceutical industry. Eliminating patents in this case may result in less innovation and, specifically, fewer new drugs being created. We also consider some of the tradeoffs of patents and look at alternative ways to reward research and development such as patent buyouts and using prizes to foster innovation. Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1RnHxr9 Next video: http://bit.ly/1XMYb62 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GSLL/
Behavioral Economics: Full Series
 
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Behavioral economics helps you understand dating, partying, college loans, voter ignorance, and all the choices humans make. Here’s our full series. SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2dUx6wg LEARN MORE: The Elephant in the Brain: Hidden Motives in Everyday Life (book): Kevin Simler and Prof. Robin Hanson discuss the unconscious motives behind our actions. https://www.amazon.com/Elephant-Brain-Hidden-Motives-Everyday/dp/0190495995 Do Free Markets Require Rational Actors? (article): Prof. Steve Horwitz explains why insights from behavioral economics that prove people do not always act rationally should be taken as arguments against the free market. https://fee.org/articles/do-free-markets-require-rational-actors/ Behavioral Economics and Irrational Voters (article): Julian Adorney applies insights from behavioral economics to electoral politics. https://mises.org/library/behavioral-economics-and-irrational-voters TRANSCRIPT: For a full transcript please visit: LEARN LIBERTY: Your resource for exploring the ideas of a free society. We tackle big questions about what makes a society free or prosperous and how we can improve the world we live in. Watch more at http://www.learnliberty.org/.
Views: 15120 Learn Liberty
‘I oppose today’s so-called capitalism’ ‒ Ron Paul on free-market economy
 
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More than half of millennials oppose capitalism in its current form, according to a Harvard University poll. Boom Bust’s Ameera David talks to former Representative Ron Paul (R-Texas) to get his take on why the system isn’t working for younger Americans. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 42967 RT America
Price Controls, Subsidies, and the Risks of Good Intentions: Crash Course Economics #20
 
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So, during times of inflation or deflation, why doesn't the government just set prices? It sounds reasonable, but price ceilings or floors just don't work. Adriene and Jacob explain why. Subsidies, however, are a little different, and sometimes they even work. We'll also explain that. Today you'll learn about stuff like price controls, deadweight loss, subsidies, and efficiency. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 415572 CrashCourse
Jordan: Regulations Should Not Stifle Economic Growth for Small Businesses
 
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Rep. Jim Jordan (OH-04), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, discusses the importance of listening to American job creators to see which federal regulations hurt or help their businesses. Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, Stimulus Oversight, and Government Spending, "Assessing the Impact of Greenhouse Gas Regulations on Small Business." The hearing continued a dialogue with private-sector job creators about the impact that federal actions have on the economy and seeks to engage the executive branch on improvements in the regulatory climate. April 6, 2011.
Command and Control Solutions
 
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What happened to the cleanliness of your clothes after the U.S. Department of Energy issued new washing machine requirements? The requirements — which require washers to use 21% less energy — mean that washers actually clean clothes less than they used to. Is “command and control" an efficient way to achieve the desired outcome (which is less pollution)? Rather than a standard requirement, such as the Department of Energy issued, a tax on electricity would provide users with greater flexibility in their washing—and would prompt people to purchase machines that use energy more efficiently and keep their clothes clean. Are there times when a command and control solution to a problem makes the most sense? We look at the eradication of smallpox as one example. Microeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/20VablY Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/1Ro4kTL Next video: http://bit.ly/1oHUJhD Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/GRza/
Media Institution: Crash Course Government and Politics #44
 
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So today we're going to look at the rather thorny issue of the media and its role in politics. Wether you're talking about older forms of media like newspapers and radio or newer forms like television and the Internet, all media serves the same purpose - to provide information to the public. So we're going to discuss their strengths and weaknesses and examine how both content creators and consumers play a role in the information that is told. It could be argued that because the media only relays information it isn't actually important to the American political system, but when you look more closely at what and how this information affects voters as well as their elected officials, we can more clearly see its importance as a political institution. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 272888 CrashCourse
Financial Reform in a Crisis: The Swedish Solution
 
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Whenever the question is raised about the appropriateness of the bailouts for our largest financial institutions during the most recent financial crisis, the usual response among people who defend the idea is to suggest that without those bailouts we would have had a meltdown of Great Depression-like standards. For example, former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner is a prominent proponent of this view. In one sense, the defenders are right: Allowing a wholesale collapse of the "too big to fail" banks likely would have triggered an economic disaster of incalculable consequences. But in another sense, the defenders of the post-Lehman financial reforms have established a false dichotomy. Because there was a third alternative, as Leif Pagrotsky, a Swedish Social Democratic politician who worked at the Central Bank of Sweden (the Riksbank) and in the Ministry of Finance, notes in the interview below. Sweden did not just bail out its financial institutions by having the government take over the bad debts. It extracted pounds of flesh from bank shareholders before writing checks. Banks had to write down losses and issue warrants to the government. This strategy held banks responsible and turned the government into an owner. When distressed assets were sold, the profits flowed to taxpayers. Plus, the government was able to recoup more money later by selling its shares in the companies as well. Pagrotsky was working at the Riksbank at the time of Sweden's banking crisis and provides an eyewitness account in this interview. What went right? What went wrong? And in retrospect, did the so-called "Scandinavian approach" offer a better alternative than the Geithner plan?
Views: 7501 New Economic Thinking
Globalization and Trade and Poverty: Crash Course Economics #16
 
09:02
What is globalization? Is globalization a good thing or not. Well, I have an answer that may not surprise you: It's complicated. This week, Jacob and Adriene will argue that globalization is, in aggregate, good. Free trade and globalization tend to provide an overall benefit, and raises average incomes across the globe. The downside is that it isn't good for every individual in the system. In some countries, manufacturing jobs move to places where labor costs are lower. And some countries that receive the influx of jobs aren't prepared to deal with it, from a regulatory standpoint. Anyway, Jacob and Adriene can explain the whole thing to you in 10 minutes. *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 715193 CrashCourse
Economic and Regulatory Models for the US Electric Utility Industry - Smart Grid Educational Webinar
 
01:40:46
The asset owners in the electric sector are a critical stakeholder group. They run their organizations very differently based on the type of utility and the geographical region in which they belong. The generation mix, the service territory demographic, and the revenue models differ considerably. To do business with asset owners requires a deep understanding of their economic models, their technological and business priorities and the regulatory framework in which they operate. In this presentation I will try to shed light on these aspects of the utility industry by surveying leading IOUs, Municipals and Cooperatives across the US. The aim will be to inform the audience so they can engage in more effective business transactions with utilities and deliver product and services that they truly need. Presenter(s): Erfan Ibrahim, CEO and Founder, The Bit Bazaar LLC Presentation documents are available at Penn State's Smart Grid Educational Webinar Series Archive at https://smartenergyacademy.psu.edu/gridstar/webinar-series-archive. You can also browse the rest of the archives there, or by using the Smart Grid Educational Webinar Series playlist on YouTube. Originally delivered on June 19, 2014. Dr. Erfan Ibrahim, Founder & CEO of The Bit Bazaar LLC is offering these monthly seminars as a public service to bridge the knowledge gap in the industry and inspire a new generation of students, researchers, engineers, and policy experts to understand the technical, policy and business requirements to enable Smart Grids and develop the skill set to design, build and manage the infrastructure in a commercially viable way. The Smart Grid Educational series seminars are bringing world-class experts in the field to educate the industry on critical issues and create a forum for interaction to solve complex problems in this field. These forums also allow national labs and academia to showcase their research work to the nation and internationally to attract new funding, new faculty, new students and new ideas for curriculum development. It is also promoting cutting edge technologies from vendors, world class experts, and sound engineering, business process and policy principles leading to economic growth, job creation, and social benefit. You can view more webinars at Penn State's Smart Grid Educational Webinar Series Archive at https://smartenergyacademy.psu.edu/gridstar/webinar-series-archive or by using the Smart Grid Educational Webinar Series playlist on YouTube.
Views: 520 GridSTAR
Paul Tucker – Unelected Power: The Quest for Legitimacy in Central Banking and the Regulatory State
 
01:32:18
Listen to Rhodes Center Podcast discussion: https://soundcloud.com/rhodescenter/paul-tucker-unelected-power Central bankers have emerged from the financial crisis as the third great pillar of unelected power alongside the judiciary and the military. They pull the regulatory and financial levers of our economic well-being, yet unlike democratically elected leaders, their power does not come directly from the people. Unelected Power lays out the principles needed to ensure that central bankers, technocrats, regulators, and other agents of the administrative state remain stewards of the common good and do not become overmighty citizens. Paul Tucker draws on a wealth of personal experience from his many years in domestic and international policymaking to tackle the big issues raised by unelected power, and enriches his discussion with examples from the United States, Britain, France, Germany, and the European Union. Blending economics, political theory, and public law, Tucker explores the necessary conditions for delegated but politically insulated power to be legitimate in the eyes of constitutional democracy and the rule of law. He explains why the solution must fit with how real-world government is structured, and why technocrats and their political overseers need incentives to make the system work as intended. Tucker explains how the regulatory state need not be a fourth branch of government free to steer by its own lights, and how central bankers can emulate the best of judicial self-restraint and become models of dispersed power. Like it or not, unelected power has become a hallmark of modern government. This critically important book shows how to harness it to the people's purposes. Sir Paul Tucker is chair of the Systemic Risk Council. He is a research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School, and the author of Unelected Power, published in 2018 by Princeton University Press. Previously, he was Deputy Governor at the Bank of England, sitting on its monetary policy, financial stability, and prudential policy committees. Internationally, he was a member of the G20 Financial Stability Board, leading its work on too big to fail; a director of the Bank for International Settlements, and chair of its Committee for Payment and Settlement Systems. His other activities include being a director at Swiss Re, a senior fellow at the Harvard Center for European Studies, a Visiting Fellow of Nuffield College Oxford, and a Governor of the Ditchley Foundation.
Dr. Oz and Nutritional Supplements: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver outlines what, exactly is problematic about Dr. Oz and the nutrition supplement industry. Then he invites George R.R. Martin, Steve Buscemi, the Black and Gold Marching Elite, and some fake real housewives on the show to illustrate how to pander to an audience without hurting anyone. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/last-week-tonight-with-john-oliver
Views: 14865830 LastWeekTonight
DNA analysis on TRAI’s new cable and  DTH rules
 
16:22
The Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI)’s new regulatory regime for cable operators and DTH companies has come into play from the month of February 2019. About Channel: Zee News is a Hindi news channel with 24 hour coverage. Zee News covers breaking news, latest news, politics, entertainment and sports from India & World. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to our other network channels: Zee Business: https://goo.gl/fulFdi Dr. Subhash Chandra Show: https://goo.gl/fCugXC Daily News and Analysis: https://goo.gl/B8eVsD ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can also visit us at: http://zeenews.india.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ZeeNews Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ZeeNews Follow us on G+: https://plus.google.com/+Zeenews
Views: 451294 Zee News
Student Interview: MSc Regulation - Bernardo Ochoa-Sumano
 
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MSc Student Bernardo Ochoa-Sumano talks about his experience on the MSc Regulation programme and student life at LSE.
Italy's finance minister Giovanni Tria - Chapter 1: the economy
 
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The Banker's Silvia Pavoni asks Giovanni Tria, minister of finance of Italy, about the country's gloomier economic forecasts and the productivity gap. (Recorded on 2nd May.) Final chapter 3 to be released on 10th
Views: 118 The Banker
EU Is Not in a Confrontational Mood on Italy, Moscovici Says
 
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Jun.05 -- European Union Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs Pierre Moscovici discusses the EU taking the first step toward disciplining Italy over its failure to reign in debt. He speaks on "Bloomberg Markets."
America’s Exceptional Work Ethic (Episode 2)
 
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American workers have always been industrious, leading to long-term growth and prosperity. The American spirit is one of self-reliance and personal responsibility, and it hasn’t wavered much even after centuries of economic success. Long-term investments in education and a willingness to move for economic opportunities have helped Americans succeed. Click below to watch the other videos in Examining America's Exceptional Economy. America's Exceptional Work Ethic: http://bit.ly/LazearEAEE1 America's Exceptional Labor Force: http://bit.ly/LazearEAEE3 Sustaining America's Exceptional Economy: http://bit.ly/LazearEAEE4 This four-part video series explores what has made America's economy successful, what sets it apart from other nations, and what needs to be done to sustain its prominence in the global economy. Lazear shows that America and its people have prospered by prioritizing economic freedom, industriousness, low taxes, light regulation, free trade, and openness to immigration. Edward Lazear studies labor markets, tax reform, human capital, and their effects on economic growth. He is the Morris Arnold and Nona Jean Cox Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Davies Family Professor of Economics at Stanford University's Graduate School of Business. He also served at the White House from 2006 to 2009 as a chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers. For more information, visit the PolicyEd page here: https://bit.ly/2KtoVvc Additional resources: Read up a copy of American Exceptionalism in a New Era, edited by Thomas Gilligan, available here: https://hvr.co/2ICcnfV Read “America’s Exceptional Economy” by Edward Lazear here: https://hvr.co/2KuxRgC Read “Law and the Regulatory State” by John Cochrane here: https://hvr.co/2tHr3VI Read “Whither American Exceptionalism?” by Niall Ferguson here: https://hvr.co/2ySCksb Read “What Makes America Great? Entrepreneurship” by Lee Ohanian here: https://hvr.co/2tOBF59 Visit https://www.policyed.org/ to learn more. - Subscribe to PolicyEd's YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdSub - Follow PolicyEd on Twitter: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdTwit - Follow PolicyEd on Instagram: http://bit.ly/PolicyEdInsta
Views: 467375 PolicyEd
The Future of Investing in the Data Economy
 
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Slides available ► https://goo.gl/VZ2fFz Full Event ► https://goo.gl/LvnmwY Michael Beal - CEO - Data Capital Management. Michael describes what is the Data Economy and what challenges it creates for investors. He also details his vision for the future of investing in the data economy and highlights lessons from the industrial revolution that can apply to finance today. Session recorded June 16, 2016, at the RavenPack 4th Annual Research Conference, titled "Reshaping Finance with Alternative Data". Watch all sessions: ► https://goo.gl/3ij1Ev Visit us at ►https://www.ravenpack.com/ Follow RavenPack on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/RavenPack
Views: 1247 RavenPack
M. Todd Henderson, "Abolish Securities Regulation (and Replace It With a Market)"
 
01:04:11
Our regulation of the stock market is based on an antiquated statute that does not fit well with the realities of modern securities practice. Corporations hoping to access public markets are required to disclose market-moving information without charge and to all investors simultaneously. This system of mandatory and simultaneous disclosure is designed to protect average, long-term investors, while ensuring that stock prices are accurate reflections of the value of the firms issuing them. But the regulations are premised on faulty assumptions about who is trading in today’s sophisticated, high-speed markets, and why they are trading. The regulation also encourages behavior that we know is socially suboptimal. The end result is regulation that purports to be about fairness for investors, but ends up harming the most vulnerable investors. In this talk, Professor Henderson will propose an alternative regulatory scheme—a market for corporate information—that will achieve fairer outcomes for investors at lower cost. M. Todd Henderson is the Michael J. Marks Professor of Law and Mark Claster Mamolen Research Scholar. This Chicago's Best Ideas talk was recorded on November 17, 2015.
How the Law Is Used to Destroy Equality and Protect the Powerful: Noam Chomsky & Glenn Greenwald
 
01:09:51
The basis for power elite membership is institutional power, namely an influential position within a prominent private or public organization. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1250013836/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1250013836&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=14f664531eccf33ed2a2b7bdfbc47f0a One study of power elites in the USA under George W. Bush identified 7,314 institutional positions of power encompassing 5,778 individuals. A later study of US society found that the demographics of this elite group broke down as follows: Age Corporate leaders average about 60 years of age. The heads of foundations, law, education, and civic organizations average around 62 years of age. Government-sector members about 56. Gender Women are barely represented among corporate leadership in the institutional elite and women only contribute roughly 20 percent in the political realm. They do appear more among top positions when it comes to cultural affairs, education, and foundations. Ethnicity White Anglo-Saxons dominate in the power elite, with Protestants representing about 80 percent of the top business leaders and about 73 percent of members of Congress. Education Nearly all the leaders are college-educated with almost half having advanced degrees. About 54 percent of the big-business leaders and 42 percent of the government elite are graduates of just 12 heavily endowed, prestigious universities. Social Clubs Most holders of top position in the power elite possess exclusive membership in one or more social clubs. About a third belong to a small number of especially prestigious clubs in major cities like New York, Chicago, Boston, and D.C.[16] In the 1970s an organized set of policies promoted reduced taxes, especially for the wealthy, and a steady corrosion of the welfare safety net.[17] Starting with legislation in the 1980s, the wealthy banking community successfully lobbied for reduced regulation.[18] The wide range of financial and social capital accessible to the power elite gives their members heavy influence in economic and political decision making, allowing them to move toward attaining desired outcomes. Sociologist Christopher Doob gives a hypothetical alternative stating that these elite individuals would consider themselves the overseers of the national economy, appreciating that it is not only a moral but a practical necessity to focus beyond their group interests. Doing so would hopefully alleviate various destructive conditions affecting large numbers of less affluent citizens. Mills determined that there is an "inner core" of the power elite involving individuals that are able to move from one seat of institutional power to another. They therefore have a wide range of knowledge and interests in many influential organizations, and are, as Mills describes, "professional go-betweens of economic, political, and military affairs."[19] Relentless expansion of capitalism and the globalizing of economic and military power binds leaders of the power elite into complex relationships with nation states that generate global-scale class divisions. Sociologist, Manuel Castells, writes in The Rise of the Network Society that contemporary globalization does not mean that "everything in the global economy is global."[20] So, a global economy becomes characterized by fundamental social inequalities with respect to "the level of integration, competitive potential and share of the benefits from economic growth."[21] Castells cites a kind of "double movement" where on one hand, "valuable segments of territories and people" become "linked in the global networks of value making and wealth appropriation," while, on the other, "everything and everyone" that is not valued by established networks gets "switched off... and ultimately discarded."[21] The wide-ranging effects of global capitalism ultimately affect everyone on the planet as economies around the world come to depend on the functioning of global financial markets, technologies, trade and labor. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elite
Views: 249034 The Film Archives
Billionaire Peter Thiel: Starting a Business and Education
 
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An interview with billionaire investor and author of Zero to One, Peter Thiel. In this interview Peter discusses what characteristics a business should aim for and why it is better to have a monopoly instead of intense competition. Peter also talks about higher education, the future of technology and the meaning of life. 📚 Books by Peter Thiel and his favourite books are located at the bottom of the description❗ Like if you enjoyed Subscribe for more:http://bit.ly/InvestorsArchive Follow us on twitter:http://bit.ly/TwitterIA Other great Venture Capitalists videos:⬇ Marc Andreessen: Venture Capital Investment Philosophy:http://bit.ly/MAndreessenVid1 Billionaire Chris Sacca on Investing, Venture Capital and Life:http://bit.ly/CSaccaVid1 Billionaire Peter Thiel on Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Competition: http://bit.ly/PTheilVid1 Video Segments: 0:00 Introduction 1:30 Horizontal and vertical progress 2:09 Techology matters more than globalisation 3:06 We have to invent in new things 4:30 Civilisation must advance 5:12 It's better to risk boldness than to be trivial 7:03 Competitive markets destroy profits 7:43 There are only two types of business 9:13 Analysis of Ford and GM 11:05 Thinking of brand as an investor 12:17 Focus on your product 13:34 Must a company have sales and distribution before you would invest? 14:22 A bad plan is better than no plan 15:31 Do you plan ahead? 16:32 Could the 24 year old peter thiel established the goal of you now? 17:04 Isnt the advancement of computers enough? 20:02 Slow growth and stagnation 21:48 Are you like Ronald Reagan? 22:07 Education in a bubble 25:22 How will the bubble pop? 26:58 Advice for 18 year old Peter Thiel 27:47 The alternatives to University will take what form? 28:47 What went wrong with the government? 30:47 Private v public money 32:39 If we could roll back regulation, would the economy recover fast? 34:10 Should every bright student turn there back on the system? 35:20 Teach for America 35:35 New York v Silicon Valley 36:28 New York trying to be like Silicon Valley 37:37 Computers are complements for humans 39:59 Free will 40:43 The meaning of life 43:40 Happiness Peter Thiel Books 🇺🇸📈 (affiliate link) Zero to One:http://bit.ly/ZeroToOneBookPT Peter Thiel’s Favourite Books🔥 100 Plus:http://bit.ly/100PlusPT Bloodland:http://bit.ly/Bloodlands Resurrection from the Underground:http://bit.ly/ResurrectionUnderground Sir Francis Bacon: The New Atlantis:http://bit.ly/FBaconNewAtlantis Interview Date: 23rd October, 2014 Event: Uncommon Knowledge Original Image Source:http://bit.ly/PThielPic Investors Archive has videos of all the Investing/Business/Economic/Finance masters. Learn from their wisdom for free in one place. For more check out the channel. Remember to subscribe, share, comment and like! No advertising.
Views: 23281 Investors Archive
The Planned Collapse Of The Economy Has Begun - Jeff Berwick on The Richie Allen Show
 
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Jeff Berwick is interviewed by Richie Allen for The Richie Allen Show. Topics include: doing the opposite of whatever the fed or central bank says, inflation, a 666 point drop in the DOW, 7 year cycles, interest rates, debt and debt instruments, collapse of the dollar, one world cryptocurrency, crpto market cap, regulation of crypto, stock market crash, who controls the money, Brexit and succession, health system and pharmaceutical industry, government indoctrination, decentralized businesses, the next crash is the big one, the greatest depression, war and tyranny, free market economics, growing censorship, Anarchapulco 2018 Find out more about The Dollar Vigilante Investment Summit here: https://dollarvigilante.com/2018Summit Catch the Anarchapulco live stream here: https://anarchapulco.com/livestream
Views: 135867 The Dollar Vigilante
Immigration Myths with Ben Powell
 
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"Immigrants steal our jobs!" Watch Ben Powell debunk this and other immigration myths in this 3:34 video from FEEtv. To learn more about why open immigration is good for economic growth, check out this article: http://www.thefreemanonline.org/features/tough-on-immigration-is-tough-on-economic-growth/
Everybody talks about capitalism -- but what is it? | Kajsa Ekis Ekman | TEDxAthens
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. In the wake of the financial meltdown and the euro crisis, a new interest in understanding capitalism has surged. So what is this system? It has the power to transform rural societies into bustling urban metropoles in only a decade, foster innovation and new technologies - but one thing the system lacks is a plan. And as we face not only economic crisis, but a much bigger climate crisis, a plan is exactly what is needed. Kajsa Ekis Ekman was born in Stockholm 1980. She is a journalist and author of two books, "Being and being bought" about trafficking in women, and "Stolen Spring" about the eurocrisis and its consequences for Greece. Her books have been translated into several languages and she lectures around the world about crisis theory, women's rights and Latin American politics. She is a critic at Sweden's major daily Dagens Nyheter and an op-ed writer for the newspaper ETC. She is the founder of the climate action movement Klimax and the solidarity network NFG. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 134967 TEDx Talks
Pavlina Tcherneva - The Federal Job Guarantee
 
01:14:02
Despite the labor market recovery, millions remain unemployed, working part-time involuntarily, in precarious employment situations, or have dropped out of the workforce entirely. Now, as always, the economy fails to create enough jobs for all those who want to work. The costs of this failure – poverty, mental and physical illness, loss of social cohesion, lack of meaningful participation in community life – are enormous and disproportionately borne by vulnerable groups. For decades, advocates called for full employment in the form of a job guarantee, and those calls are sounding louder once again. Pavlina Tcherneva, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Economics at Bard College discusses her job guarantee research, why such a policy is needed, and how it would work, from funding to implementation. In addition, she discusses how this policy would benefit those who are often excluded from full participation in economic and social life, and why a job guarantee is superior to an income guarantee alone. Professor Tcherneva conducts research in the fields of modern monetary theory and public policy. She frequently speaks at Central Banks around the world and has collaborated with policymakers from different countries on developing and evaluating various job-creation programs. She is a two-time recipient of a grant from the Institute for New Economic Thinking for her research on the impact of alternative fiscal policies on unemployment, income distribution, and public goods provisioning. More information about the job guarantee is available here: https://www.pavlina-tcherneva.net/job-guarantee Sponsored by the Modern Money Network, the Women’s Law Association, the American Constitution Society, the Harvard Law School Forum, the Tax Law and Financial Regulation Students Association, the Labor and Employment Action Project, the Reparatory Justice Initiative, the Harvard Law School Democrats, La Alianza, and the Harvard Black Law Students Association.
Views: 1659 ModernMoneyNetwork
What If Everything Changed? | Robin Hanson | TEDxNorrköping
 
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Whar may happen when the first truly smart robots appear, based on brain emulations or ems. Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer, and you have a robot brain, but recognizably human. Train them to do some job and copy it a million times: an army of workers is at your disposal. When they can be made cheaply, within perhaps a century, they will displace humans in most jobs. In this new economic era, the world economy may double in size every few weeks. Applying decades of expertise in physics, computer science, and economics, and use ofstandard theories indicate a detailed picture of a world dominated by ems. Associate Professor of Economics, and received his Ph.D in 1997 in social sciences from Caltech. Joined George Mason's economics faculty in 1999 after completing a two year post-doc at U.C Berkely. His major fields of interest include health policy, regulation, and formal political theory. Recent book: The Age of Em: Work, Love and Life When Robots Rule The Earth. Oxford University Press, 2016. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 5622 TEDx Talks
Top 5 Reasons Fracking Regulations are Whack
 
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___________________________ For more information and source data, visit http://www.justthefracts.org Government regulations on hydraulic fracturing are inefficient and ineffective. This video introduces property rights and water markets as an alternative way to monitor fracturing so as to reduce the risks and take advantage of the benefits. The nation is experiencing a natural gas and oil boom due in no small part to hydraulic fracturing, and for many states, this boom has been the driver behind strong economic growth. But like every form of energy production, fracturing has its risks. These risks are rare, begging the question of whether the current burdensome, top-down bureaucratic regulatory system is the best way to mitigate them. Instead, a property rights approach would hold people accountable for their actions and allow productivity to continue.
Views: 141399 HooverInstitution
#72, Foreign exchange rate (Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
18:44
Class 12 macroeconomics ..... Foreign exchange rate.... Foreign exchange.... Types of foreign exchange rate ..... Depreciation and appreciation of currency.... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 72 Our books are now available on Amazon Economics on your tips Macroeconomics ( new edition ) https://www.amazon.in/dp/B07R561YKH/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_3wVXCbE2Z9DZE Economics on your tips Microeconomics http://amzn.in/d/cZykZVK Official series of playlists UG courses ( bcom, bba, bca, ba, honours) – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGirAqOr-hU8e-N_Nz0UpgJ- Micro economics complete course – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg5n3YU6oEV7_HIzBuEbbOz Macro economics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGg2ORORpILqiDR1gyH3MkXw Statistics complete course- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjrAkDyeMioJ7DEexAEeVdt National income – https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLgC10_Xv-BGjpE-1V4uz_0wvvbZQnSsj_ In order to promote us and help us grow Paytm on - 7690041256
Views: 440678 Economics on your tips
Robert Murphy - Austrian Economics and Bitcoin
 
42:31
2014 Texas Bitcoin Conference in Austin, Texas. http://TexasBitcoinConference.com
Drohne mit nach Thailand nehmen und was man beachten muss
 
03:37
CAAT Registrierung für Drohnen https://www.caat.or.th/en/archives/27220 An diese E- Mail Adresse geht Euer Antrag: Economic Regulation Department Tel 0 2568 8815, 063 205 8819 Fax 0 2568 8848 Email Address [email protected], [email protected] Mit dieser E- Mail Adresse habe ich kommuniziert [email protected] Drohnenversicherung in Thailand: Für 1 Jahr 3000 baht Duang 081-8129171 [email protected] https://www.facebook.com/dronethaiinsure/?ref=br_rs https://www.nestingnomads.de/drohne-thailand-genehmigung/
Views: 1167 Florenz Kittel
Meet The Renegades - Anat Admati
 
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Ross Ashcroft speaks to Anat Admati, Finance and Economics professor at Stanford School of Business. She is author of The Bankers’ New Clothes and gives a truthful view into the banking sector and the damage it has caused to the real economy. Admati gives insight into the systemic flaws that led to the 2008 crisis and what should be done now if we want to avoid another. _______________________________________ Renegade Inc. provides its members with the content and connections that help navigate the ‘new normal’. Finding the people who are thinking differently about the world means we offer an alternative perspective on business, leadership, economics, education and the arts. Support us by subscribing here http://bit.ly/1db4xVQ - Become a Renegade Inc. member at our website here: http://www.RenegadeInc.com - Follow us on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/RenegadeEcon - Find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/RenEconomist
Views: 4089 Renegade Inc.
ESA Business Applications Socio Economic Impact
 
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Space data can have a significant impact on our daily lives - from automated trains, rehabilitation and remittance. It can transform our entire world through some incredibly innovative and forward-thinking projects throughout Europe and beyond. ESA Business Applications has invested over €250M in over 500 European businesses, created over 2500 new jobs and launched more than eighty new products. Thanks to the contributions from our national delegations and private investors, we have created a 4x return on investment, with a future projection of 7x. Here are some examples: SATFINAFRICA This project has created reliable financial solutions to many isolated people in Africa (as well as the rest of the world): https://business.esa.int/projects/satfinafrica GEOSATIS As an alternative to imprisonment, this project uses an ankle bracelet for monitoring offenders and aiding in their rehabilitation. The offenders are supervised through satellite navigation: ANSALDO STS Unveiling the first ever fully automated train, Ansaldo STS utilizes satellite data to control an unmanned train running through Australia. Find out more about how ESA Business Applications can empower your business here: https://business.esa.int/funding Find out about the projects we've worked on: https://business.esa.int/projects Keep up to date with us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ESAbusinessapps