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A, AN, THE - Articles in English
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ 'I saw A movie last night' or 'I saw THE movie last night'? A, AN, and THE are called articles and they can be very confusing. Learn exactly when and how to use articles in English in this important grammar lesson! http://www.engvid.com/a-an-the-articles-in-english/
सीखो Prepositions in English Grammar With Examples In Hindi | Learn Use Of Prepositions | Awal
 
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हिन्दी द्वारा सीखो English Grammar में Prepositions का सही इस्तेमाल. Learn Use of Prepositions in English through Hindi lesson by Awal. Learn Prepositions in English Grammar with examples in Hindi with Awal, in a simple and interesting way. This video is helpful to all people who want to learn use of Prepositions in English grammar for general use as well as appearing in competitive exams such as SSC CGL, Bank Exam, CAT Exam, SBI PO, etc. In this English tutorial video, Awal provides step by step explanation of types of prepositions and how to fit them in English sentence structure with examples in Hindi. Awal has also shown the different between a preposition and a conjunction with an example in Hindi. If you are looking for low level details on how to use various prepositions, this video can be helpful to you as a beginner. If you want to understand the basics of prepositions in English grammar, prepositional phrases, object of preposition, etc to speak English fluently and confidently, then this video with help you to know how to make sentences using different prepositions of time, place, position, direction, agent, purpose, manner, etc. This English tutorial is helpful for Indians, Pakistanis, and others around the world who can understand Hindi or Urdu. Watch other videos of Awal through this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jbEcSuEoR4&list=PLR2GOVaoHO5_GDOua3C_QmA1oN93QTGvN Follow Awal on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnEnglishWithAwal https://www.youtube.com/TSMadaan is a Hindi Life Changing Videos Channel to raise your Success and Happiness level on various subjects like motivation inspiration and self help plus personality development. This channel also shows health videos and English Videos by various trainers.
Views: 1927271 TsMadaan
Articles - 'a', 'an' and 'the' | English Grammar
 
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Learn when and how to use the articles 'a', 'an' and 'the' in this English grammar lesson. We will end the lesson with a gap-filling exercise, so you can test your understanding. Let us know how you did in the comments. For more help with learning and practising English, visit our website: http://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Good Luck!
Views: 534160 Anglo-Link
Article | Learn English Grammar Through Tamil | Spoken English Through Tamil
 
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Pebbles presents “ ENGLISH GRAMMAR Activities Vol-1 & 2 ”, to present the basics of English Language Grammar. Grammar is the basics of effective usage of any Language and hence a fundamental understanding will enable the children to use the language confidently. In this content, a structured topic-wise presentation is made to help the students practice both the use and meaning of each topic. These exercises have been developed following Multiple Choice Questions / Choosing the correct word pattern. This CD Rom complements the School English Lessons. It contains 500 such Questions, split into 50 Exercises. ENGLISH GRAMMAR ACTIVITIES Verbs Adverbs Prepositions Conjunctions Noun - Verb Present Perfect Active Voice Past Continous * Use the Appropriate Articles * Use the Correct form of noun * Countable & Uncountable Nouns * Masculine & Feminine Nouns * Feminine form of Masculine Nouns * Adjectives of Quality & Quantity * Usage of Verbs - am, is (or) are * Can / May - Indicating permission * Possessive Adjectives using has-have * Simple Past Tense - Regular Verbs * Simple Past Tense - Irregular Verbs * Can - Modals for indicating ability * Present Continuous Tense * Present Continuous Form * 'There was' or 'There were' * Verb that shows future actions * Verbs - do, does, (or) did * "There is" or "There are" * Adjectives of Size and Colour * Demonstrative Determiners * Choose the Correct Adjective * Prepositions of Time * Prepositions of Place * Possessive Adjectives * Simple Present Tense * Simple Present Form * Phrases of Sentences * Superlative Forms * May or May not * Adverbs of Manner * Adverbs of Time * Adverbs of Place * Imperative Form * Simple Past Form * Simple Sentences * Questions Words * Pronouns * Verb * Helping Verb * Was or Were * Can or Can't * Will or Won't * Prepositions * Adverbs * Subject * Objects * Subject Pronouns * Object Pronouns * Conjunctions * Noun-Verb Agreement * Compound Nouns * Noun Phrases * Noun Clauses * Verb Agreement * Comparatives * Passive & Active Voice * Superlatives * Phrasal Verbs * Relative Clauses * Zero Conditional * First Conditional * Adjectives as Nouns * Reflexive Pronouns * Reciprocal Pronouns * Indefinite Pronouns * Possessive Pronouns * Possessive Adjectives * Adjectival Phrases * Simple Present Tense * Present Perfect Tense * Simple Past Tense * Connectors * Past Perfect Tense * Second & Third Conditional * Indirect Speech * Clauses of Contrast * Modals - Giving orders * Clauses of Purpose * Adjectives-The Formations * Quantifying Determiners * Past Regrets - "I wish" * Past Regrets - "If only" * Present Continuous Tense * Past Continuous Tense * Present Perfect Continuous * Past Perfect Continuous * Verbs followed by Base Infinitive * Verbs followed by "to" infinitive * Habits in past - Using Modals * Talking about future-Different ways * Expressing Intentions & Unwillingness * Habits in Past - Using "used to" * Verbs followed by Present Participle * Adverbs and Adverbials of Frequency * Adverbs and Adverbials of Duration * Adverbs and Adverbials of Degree * Clauses of cause and effect We Help the Students to Learn Grammar..! To watch the rest of the videos buy this DVD at http://www.pebbles.in Engage with us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/PebblesChennai Share & Comment If you like
Views: 129731 Pebbles Tamil
Finding Main Ideas and Supporting Details Example
 
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A simple explanation and example of finding the main idea and supporting details in a paragraph.
Views: 142113 ProgressiveBridges
English Grammar - Gerund or Infinitive? ('I like swimming' or 'I like to swim'?)
 
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http://www.engvid.com I love to learn! I love learning! Which sentence is correct? Watch this English grammar lesson on gerunds and infinitives to find out. You'll learn when and how to use gerunds and infinitives properly -- especially useful for talking about your hobbies or interests. Then take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/gerund-or-infinitive/ .
Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper
 
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When writing an academic paper, writers should follow the accepted grammar and style conventions: not only to abide by the institutional and domain standards, but to communicate clearly to readers what was studied, when it took place, and from what perspective you are discussing your research (and that of others) in your paper. One crucial writing element that you must consider when composing your paper is verb tense. Which tense you use will determine the flow and coherency of your paper. You might have found yourself thinking along these lines before: "Everything in this study has already been completed, so shouldn’t I simple write everything in the simple past tense?" The answer is "no"--at least not in a strict sense. The verb tense you use for a given sentence or phrase depends on your position as author to the material you are discussing. As author, you stand in some distance to each element mentioned in your text in terms of your role: as participant, critic, or messenger, among others. You must also take into account the chronological reasons for choosing between present and past tenses in a given instance. Knowing which tense to use requires both knowledge of the exact guidelines set out for you in whichever formatting style you are following (APA, AMA, etc.), as well as some discretion and savvy in choosing the tense that makes the most sense for a given statement in the paper. While new authors should certainly familiarize themselves with the guidelines of the formatting style they are applying, this article will focus on the most common applications and rules of verb tense among research papers in journals and at academic institutions, reflecting basic verb usage rules in academic English and encompassing all formatting styles. This video includes: ✔ An overview of three commonly used verb tenses ✔ A detailed explanation of how these verb tenses are applied ✔ Explanation of which verb tense to use by paper section ✔ Realistic sample sentences from research papers Who should watch this video: ★Research writers writing a paper for a journal or conference ★Students interested in learning how to compose a research paper ★All students and researchers in the hard/social sciences seeking information on which tenses to use in their papers For more useful writing tips, check out these posts on our “Resources” page: “How to Write the Best Journal Submissions Cover Letter": https://wordvice.com/journal-submissi... “100+ Strong Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing”: https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/ “How to Write an Abstract”: https://wordvice.com/how-to-write-a-research-paper-abstract/ "How to Create the Perfect Research Paper Title": https://wordvice.com/how-to-write-the-perfect-title-for-your-research-paper/ Wordvice Journal Submissions Page https://wordvice.com/category/journal... Join Wordvice on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Wordvice/ Tweet @ us on Twitter: @WordviceEditing Wordvice offers resources and services in other languages and countries: ENGLISH SITE: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
The author's purpose for writing (1/3) | Interpreting Series
 
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Learn when the author's purpose is to inform, persuade, entertain, and share insights or feelings; which publications are likely to have each purpose; and what you should do as the reader to interpret the writer's message written for each of these purposes. GUIDE Interpreting What You Read (this playlist): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJgPenynBNKRS-_RDBK1CIyv Transition words... https://youtu.be/7aksqJCgAMA The author's purpose... https://youtu.be/z6H2NLPqWtI The author's point of view... https://youtu.be/aptsr0CrpWY The author's tone... https://youtu.be/h4YZ3BSaSDQ RELATED VIDEOS Vocabulary playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJjhlBnZZkd0EuC5Wv3zYUJs About Literacy playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLS9dE7WMFmJhsfgoIfpQ3mGAXiXh1Cxsm FURTHER READING The Author's Purpose: What Does it Matter? (article): http://snap.roundpath.org/index.php/articles/articles-language/63-article-authors-purpose REFERENCES Lahiri, Jhumpa. The Namesake. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2003. Print. MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by Dokashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Sofamusik" in Dance of Anarchy by Sofamusik (CC4.0)
Views: 52188 Snap Language
011 - a/an vs. the (Rule 2) English Articles - Beginning English Lesson - Basic English Grammar
 
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http://www.englishanyone.com/power-learning/ Learn to express yourself confidently in fluent English and sound like a native speaker with our FREE Power Learning video course! كيف تتعلم إنجليزي بسهولة Ты поняла разницу между 'a' и 'the'? With our latest video series, EnglishAnyone.com is attempting to pull off the seemingly impossible: we're going to teach English, to absolute beginners with no English speaking experience, IN English! This unique, revolutionary series throws out the usual English teaching conventions, parts with the traditional order in which grammar is taught and makes English accessible to anyone who wants to learn! For teachers curious to see how this is possible, and for students of any ability level who want to improve their English, welcome to English Anyone! Lesson 11 - Indefinite & Definite Articles 2 A & an are indefinite articles. The is the definite article. a/an vs the: Use a/an when you are selecting one of a group and the when there is only one of something. For more great tips and videos, and to get fluent in English faster with our FREE Email Video Course, visit us at http://www.englishanyone.com/
Views: 63254 EnglishAnyone
Use of ' The '  | 10 Rules | Articles | Arrant Grammar | Part 2
 
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Use of A, An : https://youtu.be/oedDK3EnysE Arrant Grammar is a Competitive English Grammar series in which we cover all the rules of English grammar. Video Purpose : 1. Use of Article 2. Parts of Speech 3. definite Article 4. 10 rules on how to use 'the' #thetoppers
Views: 74 The Toppers
Improve your Writing: Show, Not Tell
 
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Become a better writer, no matter what you're writing! I'll show you how to take simple, boring sentences and turn them to vibrant, expressive writing. As you practice this technique in your writing, you will find it carries over to your everyday spoken English as well. Before you know it, you'll be a more dynamic, compelling speaker and writer. Next, watch this video to improve your vocabulary: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxjsWwgPjwM Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/english-writing-show-not-tell/ TRANSCRIPT Welcome back to engVid. Here we are with a writing lesson. We are looking at the skill of showing, not telling, and it's going to transform your writing as long as you put it into practice afterwards. "Show, not tell. What's he talking about?" When we're writing we want to avoid simple statements that don't really add any description or flavour. For example: "The man was stressed." [Snores] Boring. Instead, I want you to paint a picture, I really want you to describe the man is stressed without telling me that he is. So how can you do that? We're kind of trying to avoid this word, and describe it instead. So what's he doing? "The man was fidgeting. Ah, he's fidgeting. He's so stressed, he can't sort of stay still. And biting his nails." Okay? So pick out a couple of details that show how the person was. Next one: "The room was messy." Again, it's a simple, simple sentence. It's just one sort of main clause and it's not very interesting. Much better to describe the items in the room that make it messy. For example: "There was a leftover pizza, dirty clothes were strewn"... I'll write that word for you. That means they were covering the floor. "...and there were dirty plates and cups". Okay? These details give us the idea that it is messy. Example three: "The woman was confident." Okay, but it would be much more effective if you described how she was confident. So, how does she move? How do other people react to her? "She strode", that means she walked, but with purpose. Okay? So I've picked an interesting verb. "She strode into the room, and everyone turned their heads to notice her." Okay? Much clearer, more vivid idea of confidence than just saying she was confident. Example four: "The boy was careful." Tell us how he was careful. "He placed his favourite magazine in the top drawer of his cabinet." Okay? So we need to say exactly what he is placing, the object there has been missed out. "He placed"... There's no room for me to write it. You get the idea, he places his favourite book or magazine, and look how specific it is: "the top drawer of his cabinet". Next example: "The stadium was full." Again, I'm bored with this simple sentence construction. We need to make it more interesting. "The sound from the stadium was deafening", okay? And then give us some main action perhaps: "The sound from the stadium was deafening as the crowd rose up to chant the player's name." Okay? Give the sense that the stadium is full from what you can see and what you can hear. Okay? A couple of ones to describe weather. "It was hot." Okay? Well, a very young child could write a sentence like that, so if you're sort of a teenager or an adult, it's time to raise the bar. How can we tell that it is hot? Well: "The sun was causing damage to", "The sun was melting", "The sun was burning", "The sun was causing the lady's skin to turn red". Okay? Pick out details that show the effect. "It was cold. It was cold." How do we know it was cold? How cold did it feel? What can you see? "Drainpipes were freezing, ice was as thick as"... I don't know. "It was three inches thick." Whatever, you've got to show details rather than just stating things. -"It was windy." -"The umbrella was totally bent out of shape. The umbrella"-you know for keeping the rain off us-"was totally"-that means fully-"bent"-Yeah? Bent-"...out of shape", out of its normal position. "He found it funny." Right? How funny did he find it? Okay? Better to... For us to get the idea to picture what he was doing: "He was rolling around the floor in hysterics." Okay? When you're so... Find something so funny, you're like: [Laughs]. Okay? He can't control his body he finds it so funny. "Hysterics", that means like totally lost control. "Hysteria". Okay? Hysterics. "In hysterics" means finding something really, really funny. "The castle was captured." Right. I want to get a sense of drama. I want to imagine what's happening there at the castle. Is the king having his head cut off? Are the new army marching in? What's happening? "The new flag was hoisted up on high, greeted by a cheer from the crowd." Okay? Paint pictures, pick out details. Okay? It's good to have a range of adjectives, but how can you show those adjectives? How can you describe them instead? Thank you for watching today's video. Have a go at the quiz after this, and I'll see you very soon. Remember to subscribe. Bye.
The Purpose of Grammar
 
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what is grammar
Views: 298 whatthebleepis
02 Articles 1, 2, and 3 - Name, Purpose, and Statement of Faith
 
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An Overview of Articles 1, 2, and 3 of the proposed Constitution
Views: 57 Kyle Newcomer
Linking Words of Cause & Effect - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, we will review the most common linking words (connectives) of 'cause & effect' in spoken and written English: for, so, because, since, as, therefore, consequently, because of and due to. We will end the lesson with a quiz to test your assimilation. https://www.patreon.com/anglolink For more help with learning and practising English, visit our website: http://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Enjoy!
Views: 229379 Anglo-Link
Transition Words in English | Linking Words and Phrases | English Writing
 
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Transition Words in English! Extensive list of Transition Words and Phrases in English with pictures. They can be used at the start of new paragraphs in your essays.  Learn More: https://7esl.com/transition-words/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- WATCH MORE: ★ Grammar: https://goo.gl/7n226T ★ Vocabulary: https://goo.gl/E5Ty4T ★ Expressions: https://goo.gl/JBpgCF ★ Phrasal Verbs: https://goo.gl/Ux3fip ★ Idioms: https://goo.gl/y7wNjN ★ Conversations: https://goo.gl/pmdpQT ★ Kids Vocabulary: https://goo.gl/Xr3G68 ★ English Writing: https://goo.gl/46gmY7 ★ IELTS: https://goo.gl/Tg2U4v ★ TOEFL: https://goo.gl/8Zwvic ★ British vs. American English: https://goo.gl/VHa5W8 ★ Pronunciation: https://goo.gl/P4eR39 ★ Business English: https://goo.gl/r7jqtB ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- OUR SOCIAL MEDIA: Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/7english/ Facebook: https://www.fb.com/7ESLLearningEnglish/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/7ESL1 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and lessons visit: https://7esl.com/
Views: 348342 7 E S L
WHO vs. WHOM - What's the Difference? - English Grammar - When to Use Who or Whom
 
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Are you sometimes confused about the difference between who and whom? Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 While it's true that 'who' is much more common, there are some situations where you should use 'whom' instead of 'who.' We will explore those situations in this lesson, and also look at common prepositional expressions such as 'by whom,' 'from whom,' 'to whom,' 'with whom' and 'for whom.' ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ PHRASE vs. CLAUSE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z45UdL0WTro&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WILL vs. SHALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwfUXeO3AfU&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ DO or MAKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObRS73F4tok&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F90m3SbXQqQ&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hey there and welcome back to Learn English Lab. My name is Ganesh and this lesson is all about the difference between who and whom. This is something that a lot of students find confusing - when to use who and when to use whom. In this lesson, I'll show you how to use these correctly. Before we begin, just remember that if you have any questions at all, just let me know in the comments section below and I will talk to you there. OK so let's start. Now who and whom are used in two places - they're used in questions and they're used in relative clauses. First we'll talk about questions and then we will come to relative clauses. If you're not sure what that means, don't worry - I will explain it to you when we get to that part. Now here's the rule with using who and whom - who is used in the place of a subject and whom is used in the place of an object. What do I mean by that? Well take a look at this sentence "Bruce spoke to Betsy." In this sentence we say that Bruce is the subject because Bruce does the action which is speak past tense - spoke. And Betsy is the object because Betsy receives the action. Now some people might argue - is Betsy really the object because there's a 'to' which is a preposition here but you don't have to worry about that. For the purpose of this sentence we'll say that Bruce is the subject and Betsy is the object. Take a look at these two questions over here - there's a blank there - "______ spoke to Betsy?" Here we want to fill in this blank with either who or whom - which is correct? Well if you read the sentence you realize that we know someone spoke to Betsy but we don't know who that someone was. That is we're asking about the subject so the word for the subject is who so Who spoke to Betsy? Now in the second sentence - of course you must be thinking we have to use whom here right? You probably guessed that and that is correct but before we get to that I'm just going to write 'who' over here Now read the sentence "Who did Bruce speak to?" This is actually correct in speaking and in fact when we speak we don't commonly use 'whom.' In speech we almost always use 'who' So this means if you are not sure whether to use who or whom just use who and you will be OK. Alright but I'm going to take the 'who' off. So what about if you want to write something formal or if you want to use proper grammatical form? Well in that case you need to know how to use whom correctly and in this question - if you read it "_____ did Bruce speak to?" Here, we know that Bruce spoke to someone but we want to ask who that someone was - that is we want to ask about the object of the sentence. Remember Betsy? So because we want to ask about the object we have to use whom over here. Before I write whom just notice that there's a 'to' at the end of this question - now in English we have a rule that we don't usually end a question with a preposition like to. These are all prepositions - to, with, by, from, for etc. So if you have a a preposition at the end of a question you have to bring that to the beginning before you write whom. So let's do that - I'm going to put a question mark there To whom did Bruce speak? That is actually the proper grammatical form of that question. So if you're writing something formal, this is how you should write it. OK at this point I'm going to give you a very simple rule that you can use in all situations to decide whether to use who or whom, and the rule is this - when you're making a question, think about the answer to that question. If the answer can be him, her or them, then you use whom.
Views: 198338 Learn English Lab
Improve Your Writing - 6 ways to compare
 
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One of the most common types of essays you will have to write at university as well as on the IELTS or TOEFL is a comparison essay. In this lesson, I will teach you some useful words that will help you to compare things. By the end of this video, you will be able to use terms such as "alike", "similar", "in the same way", "likewise", and more. Take my quiz at the end for more experience using these words. http://www.engvid.com/writing-6-ways-to-compare/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some key words you can use when you talk about how things are the same or similar. Okay? So when you compare two things -- when you're comparing apples and oranges, there are some similarities. They're both fruits. When you're comparing shopping to skiing, when you're comparing a city to a country or the countryside -- there is a certain language we like to use when we're saying how these things are similar or the same. In this video, I'm going to teach you a bunch of expressions you can use when comparing two things to show their similarities. Okay? So this video is called "Talking about similarities". So for this video, I decided I wanted to do a theme. I wanted to look at how Canada and England are similar. In what ways are they very much alike? Okay? So each of my sentences are going to have to do with Canada and England, and we're going to look at how they're alike using these comparison words. So for those of you watching, if you are doing the TOEFL, these words are essential. If you are doing the IELTS -- very important vocabulary here. General English, you can use these at university for essays, college, or even just general conversation. So let's get started. Okay. So how are Canada and England the same? Well, I would say, first of all, both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have Queen Elizabeth. So one word we often use when we're talking about similarities is this word, "both". Both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have trees. Both Canada and England have cities. Okay? So there are a lot of different things you can compare. This is just one of them. Now, I want to say why I wrote the word "beginning" here. "Both" often comes at the beginning of a sentence. And notice how the construction is. We have both A and B. Another example, "Both cats and dogs are animals." "Both hamsters and mice are rodents." Okay? So we use this a lot when we're comparing. We can also say "like". In this case, we're not saying, "I like Canada" or "I like" -- you know, showing preference -- we're again showing similarity. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." Canada has many immigrants. England has many immigrants. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." And again, you'll notice "like" is at the beginning of the sentence. It's often -- not always, but often -- at the beginning. We have it followed by a noun. I could change this to something else. Imagine if I wanted to compare cats and dogs. "Like cats, dogs have fur." Okay? I could say that. If I'm comparing men and women, "Like women, men are human." Okay? It's not the greatest of comparisons, but you can use these types of words when you're comparing. Okay? So now, I have some other things I want to compare. In England, they speak English. In Canada, we also speak English. Not everybody, but many Canadians speak English. Some speak French, but a lot of people speak English. So I'm going to teach you some words you can use when comparing these two sentences. "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English, too. In comparison, in Canada many people also speak English. In the same way, in Canada many people speak English." And finally, another way similar to this but slightly different, "Likewise, in Canada many people speak English." So these are a little bit different from these ones. They all mean how they are the same. But you'll notice one of the differences here is these are followed by a comma. "Likewise, comma." And then, we have the rest of the sentence. These go at the beginning of the sentence. Okay? In case you can't tell, this is a period. So we have our first sentence, "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English." Okay? So you can use these in your writing. They would really, really help on your TOEFL, IELTS, or university essays to help you get a better mark.
Simple Compound and Complex Sentences | English Grammar Lessons | Clauses in English Grammar
 
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Simple Compound and Complex Sentences in English Grammar | English Grammar Lessons | Simple, Complex, Compound Sentence | Clauses in English Grammar | simple compound and complex sentences HI, In this video we are going to learn Simple, Complex and Compound sentence, those are in trend now a days in exam. After watching this video you will clear all doubts with the help of concept. Watch this video till end and never miss such questions in exams. - DON'T FORGET TO SHARE- Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXZtR... Best Preposition Trick Ever :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Learn Something New in English :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - 5 words से 50 words याद करे (English Spoken) :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow us at:- 1. Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/officialdearsir 2. Instagram :- @dearsirofficial or click the link (https://www.instagram.com/dearsiroffi... ) 3. Twitter :- https://twitter.com/officialdearsir 4. Google + :- https://plus.google.com/1126392149936... -SUPPORT US- Donate for good purpose :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir/join Don’t forget to suggest our channel to someone who needs it :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir -----Thank You for Watching----- Team “Dear Sir” simple compound complex, simple compound complex sentences, simple compound complex in tamil, simple compound complex tnpsc, simple compound complex sentences in telugu, simple compound complex in hindi, simple compound complex sentences in hindi, simple compound complex grammar, simple compound complex in telugu, simple compound complex sentences in english, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences pdf, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences exercises, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences online exercises, simple compound complex and compound-complex rules, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences quiz, simple compound complex and compound-complex sentences examples, simple complex compound bangla, simple compound and complex sentences by mahendra guru, simple complex compound rules bangla, english grammar simple compound complex in bangla, simple compound and complex sentences by dsl, simple compound and complex sentences by dear sir, simple compound and complex sentences by jyothi, simple compound complex chart, simple compound complex conversion, simple compound complex conversion table, simple compound complex clauses, simple compound complex compound-complex sentences quiz, simple compound complex compound-complex examples, simple compound complex compound-complex sentences powerpoint, simple compound complex definition, simple compound and complex sentences dear sir, clause in english, clause in hindi, clause in sql, clause in grammar, clause in english grammar by dharmendra sir, clause in a sentence, phrase and clause in bangla, noun clause in complex sentence, clause in depth review, group by clause in dbms, order by clause in dbms, clause in english grammar in hindi, si clause in french, biggest release clause in football, if clause in tamil, if clause in telugu, if clause in english, if clause in hindi, if clause in excel, if clause in malayalam, if clause in excel formula, if clause in sql, clause in grammar english, clause in gujarati, anti profiteering clause in gst, subordinate clause in german, noun clause in gujarati, clause types in english grammar, clause in hindi explain, clause in hindi language, clause in hindi pdf, noun clause in hindi, phrase and clause in hindi, adverb clause in hindi, relative clause in hindi, adjective clause in hindi, clause in sql in hindi, throws clause in java, clause in logic, english grammar, english grammar class, english grammar in telugu, english grammar preposition, english grammar tense, english grammar in marathi, english grammar book, english grammar noun, english grammar in tamil, english grammar video, english grammar apps, english grammar all, english grammar adjective, english grammar and composition, english grammar adverb, english grammar active passive, english grammar all topics, english grammar active passive voice, english grammar articles in hindi, english grammar by dharmendra sir, english grammar best book, english grammar balasaheb shinde part 1, english grammar by unacademy, english grammar by dear sir, english grammar by awal, english grammar book pdf, english grammar bangla, b.a english grammar, b v ramana english grammar, b.ed english grammar, b.ed english grammar lesson plan, english grammar for b.ed entrance, b forms in english grammar, english grammar class
Views: 874070 Dear Sir
KEY TO ENGLISH PREPOSITIONS IN ENGLISH GRAMMAR.  LESSONS FOR BEGINNERS AND INTERMEDIATE LEVEL
 
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For more practice, you can also subscribe to our second channel - English with Alexander https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtKOdghCtFj47kMlaegeSkw **************************************** This video is key to English prepositions in English grammar. We try to learn them with examples when needed. We learn English grammar lessons for beginner and intermediate level
Using May and Might - Basic English Grammar Lesson
 
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Using May and Might - Basic English Grammar Lesson In this video podcast Rachna brings out the basic difference between the common expressions May and Might, Students often get confused while using these expressions, Rachna explains the correct usage of May and Might with the help of example sentence for better understanding. Enjoy!
Singular or Plural? Subject-Verb Agreement in English Grammar
 
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http://www.engvid.com Sometimes, it's hard to know if the verb in a sentence should be singular or plural. Learn more about such tricky cases in this short grammar lesson and take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/subject-verb-agreement/ .
Compound & Complex Sentences - English for Academic Purposes with Josh #1
 
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Watch this course live for free on YouTube every Tuesday and Thursday at 22 30 GMT (22 30 GMT = https://goo.gl/b6lTKm). Become a Premium Subscriber: http://www.smrt.me/smrt/live Premium Subscribers receive: - Two 1-hour lessons per week with a Canadian or American teacher - Video-marked homework & assignments - Quizzes & exams - Official Smrt English Certification - Weekly group video chats This class covers different sentence structures in English. Dependent and Independent clauses, compound, complex, and compound-complex sentences are discussed with examples. Join the Facebook group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/leofgroup If you would like to support the stream, you can donate here: https://goo.gl/eUCz92 Learn English with Josh at the Spokane College of English Language! http://www.usa-english.com
Views: 52300 Smrt English
How to Use Commas in English Writing
 
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http://www.engvid.com/ In this lesson, I look at comma use in the English language. If you are looking to get into university, or simply want to improve your writing, this lesson is a great way to strengthen your punctuation skills. Don't forget to test your understanding of the lesson by taking the quiz at http://www.engVid.com/
Using The Conditional -'IF' - English Grammar lesson
 
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Take a test on this lesson at : http://learnex.in/using-the-conditional-if-english-grammar-lesson/ Conditional sentences -- IF In this lesson, Rachna tells you about the four conditional sentences using 'IF'. A lot of people get confused while framing such sentences because the verbs take different forms depending on the type of conditional sentence you use.
Definite & Indefinite Articles in Spanish
 
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Sometimes using terms when you're learning a language can hurt more than it helps. This is possibly one of those times. But we need to refer to stuff somehow, right? In today's lesson, I go over Definite & Indefinite Articles in Spanish. If you don't know what those are, join the club. Even when I learned Spanish, since I learned on my own, I never knew what those were. Bottom line, it doesn't really matter, as long as you know how to use them. A definite article is simple "the". When you say "the cookie", everybody knows exactly which cookie is being talked about. Which cookie you want is definite. The opposite of that, an indefinite article is when you say "a cookie". Now, you are just saying give me "a" cookie among the many cookies. Which cookie you want is NOT definite. In the plural form, the indefinite article is basically "some" or "a few". I explain it all in the video and of course, give you the lowdown on the Spanish equivalents. So watch the video, do the Articles Worksheet available @ https://spanishdude.com/quickies/articles/ and leave me a comment or message me if you have any questions at all or need some clearing up. Get updated of new videos/lessons/posts (it's free) @ https://spanishdude.com/free-updates/ English not your first language? Subtitles (CC) available--not the automatic ones, I upload them myself.
Views: 120819 The Spanish Dude
8 PARTS OF SPEECH - Noun, Verb, Adjective, Adverb Etc. Basic English Grammar - with Examples
 
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In this lesson, you will learn all about the parts of speech. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ CONJUNCTIONS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FdEaeD1MdY&index=7&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hi and welcome to this series of lessons on the parts of speech My name is Ganesh and in this first lesson I'm going to give you a quick Introduction to the eight parts of speech. In the following lessons we'll learn more in detail about each part of speech. Before we start just remember if you have any questions at all you just have to let me know in the comments section below and I will talk to you there. OK so first of all what is a part of speech? Well a part of speech is just the name given to a word based on the job that it does in a sentence. Think of parts of speech as being kind of like job titles Just like a person can be a teacher or a doctor or a lawyer - a word can be a verb, an adjective, a noun etc depending on the job that it does in a sentence And these can be really useful to learn because when you're studying grammar you will come across terms like these, you will come across terms like nouns, verbs and adjectives, and if you know what they mean it can help you to speed up your study of grammar. Alright so how many parts of speech are there? There are eight parts of speech and we start by talking about the verb. We start with the verb because verbs are probably the most important words in the English language, and that is for two reasons: first every sentence in English must have a verb You cannot have sentences without verbs in English, and the second reason is that only verbs have tenses. I'm sure you know about past tense, present tense and future tense That's how we talk about different times and to do that we change the forms of verbs. So verbs are really important. So what does a verb do? Well a verb is a word that shows an action or a state - state means a situation. For example in the sentence Dylan plays tennis three times a week. In the sentence the verb is play because that's the action, and we're saying plays because for he,she and it we say plays - we add the 's' to the verb in the present tense, so "Dylan plays." In this next sentence "I am a teacher" - can you tell me which is the verb? The verb is 'am; - that's basically just the verb to be - but we say I am, you are, he is etc. so "I am a teacher" Now I want you to notice a very important difference between these two sentences. Notice that in the first sentence we are talking about a physical action because playing is something that we do physically. But in the second sentence we are not talking about any physical action - we're just saying "I am a teacher." We call that a state, that means a situation. So verbs can show actions or they can show states or situations. Those are the two types of verbs OK the next part of speech is the noun. A noun is the name given to a person, place, animal, thing, feeling or idea. For example here's a sentence with a lot of nouns - "Rosie went to Malta on vacation with her family last year." Can you identify all the nouns in the sentence? Well the first noun is Rosie - it's the name of a person. The second noun is Malta Malta is the name of a place. It's actually a beautiful small little island country in Europe. Malta is a place. The next noun is vacation. Vacation is the name given to a type of trip the people take, and the noun after that is family What's a family? A family is a group of people who are related - mothers, fathers, sons, daughters, brothers, sisters etc. and the last noun in the sentence is year - a year is just 365 days or the time that it takes the earth to go around the Sun. Now of course nouns can also be animals like dogs or cats or a noun could be a thing like watch, pen, t-shirt etc. Or it could be a feeling such as love or anger Those are all nouns. What's a pronoun then? A pronoun is a word that replaces a noun - replaces means it takes the place of a noun. But you might ask - why should a pronoun do that? Well take a look at this sentence -
Views: 1089861 Learn English Lab
Transition words in reading and writing
 
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Transition words help writers connect ideas between sentences and paragraphs. When you read, transitions help you understand not only the ideas themselves but also the relationship between them. EN ESPAÑOL Palabras de transición ayudan a escritores conectar ideas entre oraciones y párrafos. Cuando se lee, transiciones ayudan a comprender no sólo las ideas en sí mismas, sino también la relación entre ellas. EM PORTUGUÊS Palavras de transição ajudam o escritor a conectar ideias entre orações e parágrafos. Quando você lê, transições ajudam-no a compreender não só as ideias propriamente ditas, mas também a relação entre elas. FURTHER READING Transition words in reading and writing (article): http://snap.roundpath.org/index.php/articles/articles-language/56-transition-words-in-reading-and-writing Short list of transitions and transition words and expressions: https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html Exercises (with answers) by Oxford University Press: https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html REFERENCES Transitional Words and Phrases (web page) https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Transitions.html MUSIC "And Then We Take Them Down Again" by Dokashiteru (feat. Susan Joseph) "Solitude" in Artificial Music by Aryll Fae
Views: 133781 Snap Language
How to Write a Research Paper Introduction
 
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After the title page and abstract, the reader’s first true interaction with your research paper is the introduction. Your introduction will establish the foundation upon which your readers approach your work, and if you use the tips we discuss in this video, these readers should be able to logically apply the rules set in your Introduction to all parts of your paper, all the way through the conclusion. This video includes: ✔ Content you need to include in the Introduction ✔ The order of information and exposition ✔ Writing tips checklist for writing a stronger introduction Video Outline: 1. What is the purpose of the Introduction? 2. How do I structure my introduction? 3. What content needs to be included? 4. When should I draft the Introduction? 5. Introduction writing dos and don’ts Who should watch this video: ★Researchers planning to write a manuscript ★Those planning to submit their work to scientific journals Links: ENGLISH SITE: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Views: 118752 Wordvice Editing Service
Correct Use of WILL and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs WILL and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 See CONDITIONALS lessons here: https://goo.gl/YvhnwK For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: ‘Will’ and ‘would’. These two verbs cause a lot of confusion for English learners. So, in this video, I’m going to clear up that confusion for you. I will teach you the difference between these two modal verbs, and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end to test your understanding. Alright, there are three main differences between ‘will’ and ‘would’. Let’s start with the most basic use of the two verbs. We use the verb ‘will’ to talk about the future. One very common use is to make a prediction, or say what we expect to happen in the future. Take this sentence: We will be in Hong Kong by 8 pm tomorrow. That means, we are traveling to Hong Kong and I expect that if our flight is on time, we will be there by 8 o’ clock tomorrow night. This next sentence also talks about the future but it’s a little different. I’m not hungry, so I will just have an orange juice. Imagine that you’re sitting in a restaurant with a friend and you say this. Here, you’re not talking about the distant future, you’re talking about the immediate future. In other words, here ‘will’ is used to express a decision that you have made. We also use ‘will’ to make a promise to someone: I’ll send you all the details by email. So, I’m promising to do something for you. OK, so that’s ‘will’. What about ‘would’? Well, ‘would’ is simply the past tense form of ‘will’. So imagine that we didn’t reach Hong Kong by 8 pm. Our flight was late. We only reached there at 2 in the morning. So then, we might look back at the past and say: We thought we would be in Hong Kong by 8 pm. But that didn’t happen. We often use ‘would’ when we report a past conversation – that is, we say what someone said in the past. For example: I wasn’t hungry, so I said that I would just have an orange juice. It’s the same sentence that we saw with ‘will’, but changed to the past tense. And the last sentence becomes: She said she would send me all the details by email. OK, now you know the basic use of ‘will’ and ‘would’. So let’s look at a more challenging use of these two verbs. This is the area of most confusion for people, and it is conditionals. That means sentences where you have a condition and a result. For example: If it rains tomorrow, I’ll bring my umbrella. That’s pretty easy. You see that I’m talking about something I will do in the future (“I’ll bring my umbrella”), but only on one condition – “if it rains.” Here’s another one: If Jared stops playing video games, his grades will improve. What do you understand by that? Well, it means that Jared probably spends a lot of time playing video games, so his grades are not very good. But if he stops playing video games, then he can spend more time studying, and we expect that his grades will improve. In both of these sentences, we’ve used ‘will’. And that is because both of these are real situations (these are both possible). This type of sentence is called the first conditional. But sometimes, we want to talk about imaginary or unreal situations. For example: If I had wings, I would fly all over the world. Obviously, this is not possible. I can’t grow wings, so all I’m doing is I’m using my imagination. Notice that we have used the past tense throughout this sentence – ‘If I had wings,’ – ‘I would fly’. We’re not talking about the past, but this past tense, including ‘would’, just shows that this is not real – it’s imaginary. Now, let’s go back to Jared and his video game addiction. What if I said: If Jared stopped playing video games, his grades would improve. It’s similar to the sentence with ‘will’, but using the past tense (with ‘would’) just shows that I don’t think this is possible. Jared is not going to stop, he’s just going to keep playing video games, and his grades are never going to improve. Remember, with ‘will’ it’s possible, with ‘would’ it’s not possible, it’s imaginary. And this type of sentence is called the second conditional. But there’s one more – the third conditional. This is used to talk about past conditions. Imagine that Jared had his exam, and as we expected, his grades were poor. So then we can say: If Jared had stopped playing video games, his grades would have improved. So here, we’re talking about a condition in the past. Notice that we say ‘had stopped’ (this is the past perfect tense) in the condition, and we use ‘would have’ in the result.
Views: 923004 Learn English Lab
Parts of Speech in English - Grammar Lesson
 
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We look at the eight parts of speech in traditional English grammar. These parts of speech, sometimes called word classes, include: Nouns, Pronouns, Adjectives, Verbs, Adverbs, Prepositions, Conjunctions, and Interjections. We give an explanation of how each word class is used and have included example sentences. For some of the parts of speech we also look at sub-classes such as subject pronouns and possessive pronouns, the different types of adverbs such as adverbs of manner, adverbs of frequency, etc. In the final section, after we give a summary chart, we talk about how some teachers sometimes include a 9th part of speech which can be either Articles or Determiners. Again, we include examples. This ESL video to ideal to give students a general overview of the different parts of speech in English. ENGLISH TEACHER RESOURCE We have Parts of Speech summary charts that can be used in the classroom. They are available here: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Parts-of-Speech-in-English-ESL-Charts-Word-Classes-3626074
Views: 384355 Woodward English
Learn Telephone English - 100 Sentences You Can Use on the Phone | How to Talk on the Phone
 
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Learn 100 useful sentences that you can use on the phone. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Full list of sentences: MAKING A CALL INTRODUCTION (FORMAL) Hi / Hello. This is (your name) from (company name). Ex: This is Ganesh from ZoomFin Financial Services. My name is (your name). I’m calling from (company name). Ex: Hello, my name is Ganesh. I’m calling from ZoomFin Financial services. INTRODUCTION (INFORMAL) Hi / Hey. It’s (your name). Ex: Hey Annie, it’s Ganesh. How’s it going? How are you? Good, thanks. Great, thanks. What about you? What’s up? Not much. The usual. ASKING FOR SOMEONE (FORMAL) May I speak to (person’s name)? Ex: May I speak to Douglas Adams? Could I speak with (person’s name), please? Ex: Could I speak with Mary Smith, please? I’d like to speak to (person’s name), please? Ex: I’d like to speak to Vijay Kumar, please. Could you put me through to technical support, please? ASKING FOR SOMEONE (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) Is Doug there? Is Mary around? Can I talk to Vijay? PURPOSE OF THE CALL (FORMAL) I’m calling to ask about… Ex: I’m calling to ask about your software consulting services. Could you tell me…? Ex: Could you tell me how much it costs? PURPOSE OF THE CALL (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) I just wanted to ask… Ex: I just wanted to ask if you’re free to meet sometime this week. ASKING WHEN SOMEONE WILL BE AVAILABLE When would be a good time to call? When will he be back? Do you know when she’ll be back? LEAVING A MESSAGE Could you take a message for him? I’d like to leave her a message. Please ask her to call me back. Could you ask him to call me back? Please tell him that I’m in town. Please let her know that I would like to meet her. TAKING A CALL Good morning/Good afternoon. (Company name), (your name) speaking. Thank you for calling (company name). This is (your name). How may I help you? What can I do for you today? Ex: Good afternoon. ZoomFin Financial Services. Ganesh speaking. How may I help you? Ex: Thank you for calling ZoomFin Financial Services. This is Ganesh. What can I do for you today? ASKING WHO’S CALLING Could I ask who’s calling? May I ask who’s calling? Who’s calling, please? Where are you calling from, please? TELLING THE CALLER TO WAIT (FORMAL) Please hold. Let me transfer you. I’ll put you through now. I’m connecting you now. TELLING THE CALLER TO WAIT (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) Just a moment Hold on. Hang on a second. SAYING SOMEONE ISN’T AVAILABLE (FORMAL) I’m sorry, he’s on another call right now. I’m sorry, she’s not here today. I’m afraid he’s not available at the moment. I’m afraid she’s left for the day. He’s not in his office right now. SAYING SOMEONE ISN’T AVAILABLE (INFORMAL/SEMI-FORMAL) She’s out of town. He’s not home right now. She isn’t back from work yet. He’s gone to the movies with his friends. TAKING A MESSAGE Can I take a message? Would you like to leave a message? I’ll give her your message as soon as she gets back. I’ll ask him to call you as soon as he gets back. I’ll let her know that you called. MISDIALED CALLS I’m sorry, there’s nobody here by that name. I think you’ve dialed the wrong number. ASKING FOR INFORMATION Would you happen to know…? Ex: Would you happen to know when the conference takes place? Can you give me…? Ex: Can you give me a tentative date? Can I have…? Ex: Can I have your name and number, please? CHECKING INFORMATION Could you spell that for me? Let me read that back to you. HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH A CALL (FORMAL) Sorry, I can’t hear you very well. Could you speak a little more loudly, please? Could you speak up a little? Would you mind speaking a little more slowly? Could you repeat that? Could I call you back, please? It looks like we have a bad connection. HAVING DIFFICULTY WITH A CALL (INFORMAL) I didn’t catch what you just said. I’m sorry, what was that? Can you say that again? Can I call you back? Sorry, you’re breaking up. MAKING ARRANGEMENTS How about (day/date)? Ex: How about next Friday? Would (day/date) work for you? Ex: Would tomorrow work for you? Shall we say (day/date)? Ex: Shall we say September 12? ASKING FOR SUGGESTIONS/PREFERENCES What would you suggest? What would you prefer? Do you have a place in mind? MAKING REQUESTS Could you send me the details by email, please? Would you mind calling back tomorrow? RESPONDING TO A REQUEST Yes, I’d be happy to. Sure, no problem. I’ll email you the details right away. Sorry. I can’t do that. I’m afraid I don’t have that information. I’ll have to get back to you on that. ENDING THE CALL (FORMAL) It was nice talking to you. Thank you for your help. Thank you for your time. Thanks for calling. Have a nice day. ENDING THE CALL (INFORMAL) Anyway, I should get going. Take care. You too. Talk to you later. Bye.
Views: 491650 Learn English Lab
Conjunctions in English Grammar | Conjunction in Hindi | All Conjunction English Grammar
 
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Conjunctions in English Grammar | Conjunction in Hindi | All Conjunction English Grammar | Conjunction Junction | conjunction for kids | conjunction all rules | Hey! To be fluent in English you must have command over conjunction. It makes your English Impressive and effective. As a student if you are preparing for any govt job exam then this video can be a life changer for you. We have covered almost all conjunction in a single video so that you can learn it easily. Watch this video with your friends so that they also can improve the same. Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples :- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pXZtR... Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Best Preposition Trick Ever :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Learn Something New in English :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - 5 words से 50 words याद करे (English Spoken) :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow us at:- 1. Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/officialdearsir 2. Instagram :- @dearsirofficial or click the link (https://www.instagram.com/dearsiroffi... ) 3. Twitter :- https://twitter.com/officialdearsir 4. Google + :- https://plus.google.com/1126392149936... -SUPPORT US- Donate for good purpose :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir/join Don’t forget to suggest our channel to someone who needs it :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir -----Thank You for Watching----- Team “Dear Sir” Conjunctions English Grammar Conjunctions in English Grammar Conjunction in Hindi conjunction junction Conjunction English Grammar Conjunction Junction conjunction for kids conjunction mahendra guru conjunction by dharmendra sir conjunction by dear sir conjunction by neetu singh conjunction by anchal sharma conjunctions in english grammar in hindi conjunction for ssc cgl conjunction for uptet conjunction for class 2 conjunction in hindi, conjunction in english grammar, conjunction by dharmendra sir, conjunction by dear sir, conjunction english grammar in hindi, conjunction song, conjunction words, conjunction for kids, conjunction by dsl, conjunction and, conjunction and interjection, conjunction and preposition, conjunction and disjunction, conjunction all, conjunction and disjunction in discrete mathematics, conjunction all rules, conjunction and its kinds, conjunction and its types in hindi, a conjunction song, a conjunction of drones simulating the way in which, conjunction by english guru, conjunction by sartaz sir, conjunction by sanjeev sir, conjunction by vishal sir, conjunction by anchal mam, conjunction class, conjunction conjunction, conjunction class 10, conjunction class 7, conjunction chapter, conjunction chart, conjunction control, conjunction class 2, conjunction common error, conjunction class 6, conjunction dear sir, conjunction dsl, conjunction dharmendra sir, conjunction definition in hindi, conjunction dance, conjunction disjunction, conjunction deutsch, conjunction definition in urdu, conjunction disjunction negation conditional, conjunction english, conjunction english guru, conjunction exercise, conjunction english grammar in tamil, conjunction english grammar dsl, conjunction english grammar in hindi dear sir, conjunction error, conjunction english grammar in marathi, conjunction for ssc, conjunction full movie, conjunction for class 8, conjunction for class 6, conjunction for class 3, conjunction for class 7, conjunction for tet, conjunction grammar, conjunction grammar in hindi, conjunction gujarati, conjunction game, conjunction german, conjunction grammar in tamil, conjunction grammar rules in hindi, conjunction ganesh, conjunction grade 3, conjunction guru, warren g conjunction junction, conjunction hindi, conjunction horror movie, conjunction hindi grammar, conjunction hindi mai, conjunction hindi meaning, conjunction however, conjunction homeschool pop, conjunction how to use, conjunction hindi me, conjunction hindi word, conjunction kya h, conjunction in telugu, conjunction in hindi tricks, conjunction in marathi, conjunction in german, conjunction in hindi grammar, conjunction in french, conjunction in astrology, in conjunction, in conjunction with meaning in hindi, in conjunction with in a sentence, in conjunction in malay, in conjunction with the reverse vampires, in conjunction with meaning, in conjunction f+ cells, conjunction joining words, conjunction junction trap remix, conjunction junction glee, conjunction junction verbs, conjunction junction prepositions, conjunction jungle, conjunction junction with lyrics, conjunction junction spanish, conjunction junction remix, conjunction kya hota hai, conjunction ka use, conjunction kya hai, conjunction ka prayog
Views: 428250 Dear Sir
Correct Use of 'SUPPOSED TO' - With Examples, Exercises and Quiz - English Grammar
 
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Learn the correct use of 'SUPPOSED TO'. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 2. Correct Use of COULD and WOULD: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mU9lY1HF5Mc&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 3. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 4. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix All examples from the lesson: Form: be + supposed to + main verb (base form) I + am supposed to (present) / was supposed to (past) He/She/It + is supposed to (present) / was supposed to (past) You/We/They + are supposed to (present) / were supposed to (past) Uses 1. Duty, responsibility, obligation You are supposed to listen during the lecture, not talk. Why are you late? You were supposed to be here at 9 o' clock. I am supposed to give a speech at my best friend's wedding next week. You are not supposed to smoke in here. We are not supposed to feed the animals in the zoo. When are we supposed to submit this assignment? What am I supposed to do? 2. Intention or purpose What is a calculator supposed to do? It is supposed to help you do mathematical calculations quickly. What are ATMs supposed to do? They are supposed to let a bank's customers withdraw cash when they need it. A company's logo is supposed to help people easily identify its products. The government's new e-filing website was supposed to make income tax payment simpler for citizens. But many people say it has made the process more difficult! 3. Expectations What am I supposed to write in a cover letter? You're supposed to say what job you want to apply for, and what relevant skills you have. The match was supposed to start at 5 PM, but it has been delayed due to rain. Popular belief Harvard Business School is supposed to have the best MBA program in the world. This restaurant is supposed to serve fantastic sushi. I got robbed in broad daylight in Canada once. And it is supposed to be one of the safest countries in the world! Quiz: 1. You must pay the rent before the third day of the month. 2. Students are not allowed to bring any electronic devices into the exam room. 3. Radha and Anish were going to get married in August, but they've postponed the wedding to December. 4. Professor Sanchez was scheduled to speak at this conference, but she got ill. 5. I have agreed to pick up a friend of mine at the airport at 8 PM. 6. The job of the government is to protect all of its citizens, regardless of their religious beliefs. 7. The purpose of a graph is to display data visually to make it easier to understand. 8. Many people say that The Titanic is the greatest romantic movie of all time. Quiz answers: 1. You're supposed to pay the rent before the third day of the month. 2. Students are not supposed to bring any electronic devices into the exam room. 3. Radha and Anish were supposed to get married in August, but they've postponed the wedding to December. 4. Professor Sanchez was supposed to speak at this conference, but she got ill. 5. I'm supposed to pick up a friend of mine at the airport at 8 PM. 6. The government is supposed to protect all of its citizens, regardless of their religious beliefs. 7. A graph is supposed to display data visually to make it easier to understand. 8. The Titanic is supposed to be the greatest romantic movie of all time.
Views: 160299 Learn English Lab
How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less
 
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"How to Write a Literature Review in 30 Minutes or Less" breaks down this academic assignment into 5 easy steps: (There is a text version of this video: http://www.peakwriting.com/litreview/Index.html 1. Strip out summary paragraphs from research 2. Reorder summary paragraphs for the liteature review 3. Combine paragraphs if necessary 4. Add topic sentences and transitions to form literature review's body paragraphs 5. Add introduction and conclusion paragraphs to complete the literature review The literature review does not have to be a daunting or mysterious academic assignment. As a matter of fact, the so-called "literature review" is a common task in the professional workplace but is called a "backgrounder" or "background research" instead of a literature review. The video provides a real-world example of writing a practical literature review as an HR employee in an IT company. Stop being intimadated by what is actually an easy assignment by learning what a literature review really is and how to do one quickly and easily. Review of Literature | Literature Review Example | Literature Review Sample | Literature Survey | Literature Review Format | Literature Review Dissertation | Example of Literature Review | Writing a Literature Review
Views: 625452 David Taylor
Sentence Ending Particles: "よ (yo)" = ANNOYING? & ね (ne) & よね (yone) & っけ (kke)
 
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Support Me on Patreon ★ - https://www.patreon.com/japaneseammo This time we'll learn HOW TO use the sentence ending particles ね (ne), よ (yo), よね (yone) and っけ (kke). I see a lot of learners use these ending particles (especially the よ particle) wrong. It seems like a small thing but it could make a huge difference in a sentence and could end up annoying Japanese people. Have you also wondered what "っけ" or "だっけ" mean? It's actually very common! ----------------------------------------------------------------------------- ★☆★NEW JAPANESE AMMO SHOP★☆★ https://teespring.com/stores/japaneseammo?pr=SUMMERAMMO (US / CANADA / INTERNATIONAL) https://teespring.com/stores/japanese-ammo-uk-eu?pr=SUMMERAMMO (UK / EU / INTERNATIONAL) ★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★ Please don't forget to SUBSCRIBE and LIKE the videos :) I read all the comments and I appreciate them all xx ********************************************** SUBSCRIBE to our Newsletter!!! ☆ More Japanese lessons exclusively for subscribers http://bit.ly/1YldZgu ********************************************** Twitter lessons! Talk to me @japaneseammo https://twitter.com/japaneseammo Instagram @japaneseammo_misa https://www.instagram.com/japaneseammo_misa/ Join my kawaii gang on FB: https://www.facebook.com/japaneseammo/ Read more articles on the grammar - http://www.japaneseammo.com/
Views: 130223 Japanese Ammo with Misa
Subject-Verb Agreement | Learn English Grammar Online
 
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Subject-Verbs Agreement: Everyone does or do? neither of them has or have? The data is or are? With some nouns, indefinite pronouns and determiners, it is not obvious whether we should use a singular verb or a plural verb. In this lesson, we'll be looking at these tricky cases together, and finish with an exercises to test your assimilation. There is a lot of information in this lesson, so I recommend you take notes as you watch. For more lessons and exercises to learn and practise English, visit our website: https://anglo-link.com Facebook: http://facebook.com/AngloLink Twitter: http://twitter.com/AngloLink Enjoy!
Views: 113705 Anglo-Link
Correct Use of CAN and COULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs CAN and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello there. You know, I get this question all the time – both from my students in my classes and on YouTube – what is the difference between ‘can’ and ‘could’? Well, in this lesson, I will teach you the three main differences between these modal verbs and I’ll show you how to use them correctly without making mistakes. As always, there is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. The very first thing you should know is the basic use of ‘can’. This verb is used to show ability. Here are some examples: I can play the guitar. He can lift heavy weights. She can beat anyone at chess! So, all of these express ability. What about what ‘could’ then? Well, ‘could’ is just the past tense of can. I can say: I could play the guitar when I was in school. That means, I had the ability in the past, but now I can’t play the guitar because it’s been a long time and I’m out of practice. Here a couple more examples: He could lift heavy weights until he had the accident. She could beat anyone at chess in her prime! ‘In her prime’ means in her best years. Maybe when she was younger and was playing competitively. So in these sentences – ‘can’ shows present ability, and ‘could’ shows past ability. This is the first difference between the two words. The second difference is when we want to talk about possibility. To talk about what is possible, we normally use ‘could’ and not ‘can’. Now, imagine that you and me, we’re both waiting for a train at a train station. It’s time for the train to arrive but we don’t see it. So I might say: Hmm, the train could be late. So I’m making a guess about the current (or the present) situation, saying what is possible. Here’s another one: If you don’t study, you could fail the exam. Are you sure to fail the exam? No. You could pass. But I’m saying that it’s possible that if you don’t study, you’ll fail. Notice that this sentence talks about future possibility. Ah, but I have a question – we just talked about present and future possibility. Can we talk about past possibility? Yes, we can. Here’s an example: Robert could have gotten the job if he had gone to the interview. So what do we understand from that? Well, there was a job interview. It was possible for Robert to go to the interview and get the job. But he didn’t go. So he didn’t get the job. Now, as I said before, we use ‘could’ in all these sentences to talk about what’s possible in the past, present, and future, but there is one situation where you can use ‘can’ and that is when you want to talk about general possibility. For example: You can catch a cold if you go out in the rain. Traveling across Europe can be quite expensive. You can see that these are just general statements about what is possible in the world. In this case, it’s OK to use ‘can’, but this use is less common. Normally, when we talk about possibility in our lives we use ‘could’. Remember that. Alright, let’s now move on to the final use of ‘can’ and ‘could’, and this is in polite expressions when we talk to people. There are four situations you need to know about. The first is making suggestions. For this purpose, we use ‘could’. Here are some examples: We could try that new Italian restaurant tonight. You could ask your sister to lend you some money. In the first sentence, I’m making a suggestion about where we can have dinner. In the second, I’m suggesting that if you need money, why don’t you ask your sister? Using ‘could’ just makes it very polite. The second situation is making requests. Here, both ‘can’ and ‘could’ are possible: Can you pass me the salt? Could you pass me the salt, please? Or on the phone: Can I speak to Rahul? Could I speak to Rahul, please? Did you notice that I said ‘please’ at the end of the sentences with ‘could’? That’s because ‘could’ is more polite than ‘can’. So if you are in a formal situation, like if you’re talking to your boss or other superior and you want to be very polite, use ‘could’. If you’re with friends or family, then ‘can’ is fine. Our next function is making offers: Can I get you something to drink? Could I get you something to drink, sir? Can I help you with that? Could I help you with that, madam? Again, notice the extra politeness with ‘could’. Finally, the last conversational situation is when we want to ask for permission. Here are some sentences: Can I borrow your pen? Could I borrow your pen, please? Can I take the day off tomorrow? Could I take the day off tomorrow? If you’re very friendly with your boss at work, you would use ‘can’, but if your boss is very strict, then you would use ‘could’.
Views: 225488 Learn English Lab
How to write a hook
 
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Learn how to write a hook (attention-getting intro) for an essay. Video includes 5 kinds of hooks: inverted pyramid, fact/statistic, anecdote/personal experience, rhetorical question, and bold pronouncement. Also included are 3 hooks to avoid. Twitter @mistersato411
Views: 693008 mistersato411
Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples | Present Tenses, Past Tenses, Future Tenses
 
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Learn Tenses in English Grammar with Examples | Present Tenses, Past Tenses, Future Tenses | Learn Tenses in Easy Way | tense all rules | Tense Chart in English After waiting around 1 month, now Full English grammar tenses video is on YouTube. In this video you will learn all three types of tenses. 1:- #Present_Tenses, 2:- #Past_Tenses and 3:- #Future_Tenses. We have created this video in a easiest way so that everyone can relate it to their life and learn it easily. This is the one 02:00:00 hours long video covered all the possible types of tenses with lots of examples. This is the best English video till now uploaded by Dear Sir. Open it and start learning. - DON'T FORGET TO SHARE- Best Preposition Trick Ever :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrnHPBcOqMnNZLHKYhUaZpRzchFtUb89 - Learn Something New in English :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - 5 words से 50 words याद करे (English Spoken) :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... - Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow us at:- 1. Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/officialdearsir 2. Instagram :- @dearsirofficial or click the link (https://www.instagram.com/dearsiroffi... ) 3. Twitter :- https://twitter.com/officialdearsir 4. Google + :- https://plus.google.com/1126392149936... -SUPPORT US- Donate for good purpose :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir/join Don’t forget to suggest our channel to someone who needs it :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir -----Thank You for Watching----- Team “Dear Sir” Tenses, Tense chart, tenses in english, tenses in english grammar, english tenses in hindi, english tenses lesson in hindi, english tenses lesson full video with examples, english tenses, present tense, present indefinite tense, present continuous tense, present perfect tense, past tenses, past tenses in english , past tenses in english grammar in hindi, future tense, future tense examples, spoken english, learn speaking english, speaking english practice, speaking english fluently, speaking english course, tense tense chart tenses in telugu tenser tense kitne prakar ke hote hain tense class tense in english tense in hindi tense all tense and time tense app tense all rules tense and voice tense adda tense and its types tense and verb a tense chart a tense chart in english a tense chart with examples tense banana tense by english guru tense banane ka tarika tense basic tense by dear sir tense class 10 tense chart image tense class 9 tense class in hindi tense chart in punjabi tense chart in odia tense chapter tense definition tense dear sir tense drama tense definition in hindi tense details tense download tense english tense english guru tense error tense example tense explain in hindi tense english class tense english me tense explanation tense error detection tense grammar in hindi
Views: 5337500 Dear Sir
How to write a conclusion
 
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How to write a conclusion paragraph for an essay. Breaking it down into simple parts and providing examples. Be sure to check out the companion video: How to Write an Introduction! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EycoDPjVoQY
Views: 521951 MrTSallee
Learn English from Scratch - Lesson 1 - Become Fluent in Spoken English - Learn How to Read & Write
 
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#StudyIQ Pendrive Courses for Various Govt. Exams, Click here http://bit.ly/2QcdLOd to know in detail OR Call 95-8004-8004 UPSC/CSE - This is our Flagship & Most Selling Course. This course covered Length & Breadth of UPSC vast syllabus and made by Elite & Very best faculties from all over India with StudyIQ Trust. Click here http://bit.ly/2QbHfM7 to watch Demo Videos, Course Content, Authors, Etc. SSC & Bank - This is our oldest Course, made by Founders of StudyIQ. 1000+ videos so far and new videos added every week. Click here http://bit.ly/2QaG3ZE to know more. UPSC Optionals - We have covered almost all major UPSC Optionals. Click here http://bit.ly/2QqTKUU to find yours State Exams PSCs - Currently we have 18 States covered, More to come, Choose your state. Click http://bit.ly/2Qgv6G0 to watch demo videos, know about authors and all. Defense Exams - CDS, NDA, CAPF, SSB, AFCAT, Airforce. Click here http://bit.ly/2zT8MbP to get into the Army, Navy or Airforce SSC JE Exams - Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, Electronics. Click here http://bit.ly/2G8eDQ0 to know more RBI Grade B - Grade B is the most popular Job after IAS. This course made by well-experienced faculties of Study IQ. Click here http://bit.ly/2DAtlwm to watch demo videos, Authors, Course content. NTA NET - Start your preparation for UGC(NTA) NET prestigious exam. We have courses for both Paper 1 & 2. Click here http://bit.ly/2HnhFNQ to check UPSC Prelim Test Series - Our flagship test series for UPSC Prelims. More than 60% Sucess rate in 2018. Click here http://bit.ly/2Ea4Rtx to enroll right now DMRC Exams - Courses for Delhi Metro Technical & Non-Technical Exams. Click here http://bit.ly/2Q4cFS8 to know more Insurance Exams - LIC, NICL, and other insurance exams. Click here http://bit.ly/2VpbXjE to know more Law Exams - Find courses for Undergraduate and Judiciary Exams. Click here http://bit.ly/2Jk4G31 to check Railway Jobs - More than 1.5 Lac jobs to come this year. Start your preparation with us for Tech or Non-Tech posts. Click here http://bit.ly/2Ti5NB6 to check the available courses Teaching Jobs - CTET, DSSSB. Click here http://bit.ly/30oBgWP to know more NABARD Grade A - https://goo.gl/C6CzAL Have a doubt? Click here http://bit.ly/2qWhdOI to start instant Chat with our Sale team or you can #Call_9580048004 _____________________________________________________________________ Click here http://bit.ly/2V5GN0h to Sponsor Study IQ UPSCIQ Magazine - http://bit.ly/2DH1ZWq || Bank IQ Magazine - http://bit.ly/2QxyNmJ Daily Current Affairs - http://bit.ly/2t68FG1 Follow us on Instagram - http://bit.ly/2K0uXEH Download All Videos PDFs - https://goo.gl/X8UMwF || Join StudyIQ on Telegram - https://goo.gl/xBR3g8 Monthly Current Affairs - http://bit.ly/2GtcCuP Topic Wise Current Affairs - http://bit.ly/2VHxiZw Free PDFs - https://goo.gl/cJufZc || Free Quiz - https://goo.gl/wCxZsy || Free Video Courses - https://goo.gl/jtMKP9" Follow us on Facebook - https://goo.gl/iAhPDJ Telegram - https://t.me/Studyiqeducation The Hindu Editorial Analysis - https://goo.gl/vmvHjG Current Affairs by Dr Gaurav Garg - https://goo.gl/bqfkXe UPSC/IAS Burning Issues analysis- https://goo.gl/2NG7vP World History for UPSC - https://goo.gl/J7DLXv Indian History - https://goo.gl/kVwB79 Follow us on Facebook - https://goo.gl/iAhPDJ Follow Dr Gaurav Garg on Facebook - https://goo.gl/xqLaQm UPSC/IAS past papers questions - https://goo.gl/F5gyWH SSC CGL + IBPS Quantitative tricks - https://goo.gl/C6d9n8 English Vocabulary - https://goo.gl/G9e04H Reasoning tricks for Bank PO + SSC CGL- https://goo.gl/a68WRN Error spotting / Sentence correction https://goo.gl/6RbdjC Static GK complete- https://goo.gl/kB0uAo Complete GK + Current Affairs for all exams- https://goo.gl/MKEoLy World History - UPSC / IAS - https://goo.gl/kwU9jC Learn English for SSC CGL, Bank PO https://goo.gl/MoL2it Science and Technology for UPSC/IAS - https://goo.gl/Jm4h8j Philosophy for UPSC/IAS - https://goo.gl/FH9p3n Yojana Magazine analysis -https://goo.gl/8oK1gy History for SSC CGL + Railways NTPC - https://goo.gl/7939eV
Views: 2901043 Study IQ education
Language Art Games for Primary School : Teaching Language Arts & More
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehow Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehow Language arts games for primary school are a great way to introduce kids to topics that may seem more advanced. Find out about language arts games for primary school with help from an education director at Aspen Learning in this free video clip. Expert: Tenley Hardin Contact: limitlessheart.com/ Bio: Tenley Hardin has a Bachelor of Theatre Arts from the University of Michigan (2001) and a Master of Arts in English from Belmont University (2005). Filmmaker: Nicholas Wilson Series Description: Language arts is very important for elementary school kids, high school kids and everyone in between. Learn about language arts and teaching with help from an education director at Aspen Learning in this free video series.
Views: 336167 eHow
READING COMPREHENSION in Exams, Tests - Strategies, Tips and Tricks - Building Reading Skills
 
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In this lesson, you will learn strategies for READING COMPREHENSION exercises in exams and tests. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PRESENT SIMPLE TENSE Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWr1HXqRKC0&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ ALL TENSES Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsRNZW607CtVZhg_SzsbiJw ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ALL GRAMMAR LESSONS: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 ➜ VERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LciKb0uuFEc&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ NOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8sBYpxaDOPo&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ PRONOUNS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCrAJB4VohA&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADJECTIVES: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SnmeV6RYcf0&index=5&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ ADVERBS: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKL26Gji4UY&index=6&list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 Transcript: Hello and welcome back. This lesson comes from a request by Aditya from Maharashtra, India. Aditya says he is preparing for a competitive exam and he has to do reading comprehension exercises as part of the exam, and he wants to know the best way to do these. Before we start, if you want to request a lesson, just leave a comment. In your comment, tell me your name, and I will mention you in the video. OK, in this lesson I will give you some important tips and strategies for reading comprehension exercises. I will give you a reading plan that you can follow, and there are exercises in this lesson for you to practice. Alright, now my teaching experience is mostly with exams like the IELTS and TOEFL, but the tips that I give you in this lesson will help you in any exam situation. So the first thing is: when it comes to reading in an exam, budget your time. That means: you should know how many reading passages there are in the exam, how many exercises there are and how much time you have. In the IELTS exam, for example, there are three reading passages and you have one hour to do all of them. So then divide your time amongst those passages – for IELTS, you might spend roughly 20 minutes per passage. In some exams, one passage might be shorter or easier, and another passage might be longer or more difficult. In that case, obviously, you should plan to spend less time on the short passage, and more time on the long passage. And you should time yourself – if you are allowed to wear a watch in your exam, look at your watch and keep track of the time. If you plan for 20 minutes per passage, stick to that plan. Now, if you’re not allowed to wear a watch, then use the clock in the room or hall, or ask the invigilators how much time you have left. Alright, that’s the first thing: budgeting your time. So now the exam starts – and you have the first reading passage in front of you – what do you do? Well, I’ll tell you what you should NOT do – don’t start at the beginning and read slowly to the finish. Many students do this – and the problem is that when you get to the end, you will have forgotten a lot of the details in the middle, and when you read the questions, you have to go back and read the passage again to find the answers. Instead, here’s the plan that you should follow: your first step in reading should be to skim the passage. What does that mean? Well, skimming is actually something that we do with milk. It’s when you heat or boil milk, and the fat rises to the top in the form of cream. Removing that layer of fat is called skimming. When it comes to reading, skimming means to read the surface of the text quickly to understand the overall message. So if there’s a heading or title to the passage, and if there are subheadings, read all of these first. They will tell you the subject of the text. Then read the first sentence of each paragraph – they will give you a good idea of the overall message. Let’s practice this. You see two paragraphs on the screen, but only the first sentence in each paragraph is visible. Stop the video, read the sentences and try to understand the main topic in each paragraph. Alright, so what do you think the topic of the whole passage might be? It could be the negative effects of social media on children. What about the first paragraph? What is it about? Well it says that using social media can affect a child’s writing skills. And the second paragraph? It says that some people don’t agree with this – that is, the first paragraph – for two reasons: scientific reasons and practical reasons (pragmatic).
Views: 350411 Learn English Lab
Correct Use of COULD and WOULD | What's the Difference? | Modal Verbs in English Grammar
 
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Learn how to use the modal verbs COULD and WOULD correctly in this lesson. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the correct use of ‘could’ and 'would’. In this lesson, I will teach you how to use these two modal verbs without mistakes. There is a quiz at the end of the video to test your understanding. OK, there are three main differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’ that you need to know. So let’s start with the first one: This is in the use of the past tense. ‘Could’ is the past tense of ‘can’ and ‘would’ is the past tense of ‘will’. Take this sentence: “I can run a mile in 10 minutes.” This means I have this ability (to run a mile within 10 minutes). This is in the present tense but we can change it to the past by saying “I could run a mile in 10 minutes when I was younger.” It means I had the ability in the past but I don’t have it now. In this next example: “I know we will win the match.” So maybe we’re on the same team, and I tell you “I know we will win.” I’m confident. But if the match happened in the past (it’s already finished), and I want to say that I was confident, I can say “I knew we would win the match.” Here, ‘will’ becomes ‘would’. This is the first difference. The second difference relates to talking about possible situations and imaginary situations. Take this example: “It could rain tonight.” So I look at the sky and I see clouds. And I make a prediction about the future. Here’s another sentence – “John isn’t answering his phone. He could be busy.” That is I’m saying that it’s possible that he’s busy. Notice that in both of these sentences, ‘could’ is not a past tense form – it’s just used to show possibility. But I cannot use ‘would’ for this purpose. So, these are possible situations, but when we talk about imaginary situations, we prefer to use ‘would’. For example, “If I had a million dollars, I would buy a beach house.” Again, don’t be confused by the past tense. We say “If I had” and “I would buy” because we want to show that this is imagination – it’s not reality (I don’t have a million dollars). Here’s another example: “If Shirley worked hard, she would get a promotion.” This means she doesn’t work hard (she’s lazy), so she’s not going to get a promotion. Now, in both of these sentences, we can use ‘could’ to show imaginary ability but it’s less common. ‘Would’ is used a lot more when it comes to imaginary situations. This is the second difference. Let’s now move on to the third and final difference – and this is in polite expressions. There are four functions that are important for us – making suggestions, offers, requests and asking for permission. First, to make suggestions, we normally use ‘could’ as in this example: “We could try that new Italian restaurant.” So imagine that we’re planning to have dinner together and I make this suggestion. Here, using ‘would’ is wrong. But to make an offer, we prefer ‘would’. For example: “Would you like some tea?” That means, I have tea and I’m asking you if you want some. Here, we cannot use ‘could’. But making requests is different because it is possible to use both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could you open the window, please?” You can also say, “Would you open the window, please?” although this is very formal and polite. However, we also sometimes use “Would you mind…” as in “Would you mind opening the window?” This is a request, but this phrase is fixed – you cannot say “Could you mind…?” And when we ask for permission, again there are expressions with both ‘could’ and ‘would’. For example, “Could I borrow your car for a couple of days?” Maybe I’m saying this to a friend, so I’m asking my friend for permission to use his or her car. I can also say, “Would it be OK if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” or “Would you mind if I borrowed your car for a couple of days?” ‘Would you mind’ can be used to ask permission as well. Notice that when we use ‘would it be OK if’ or ‘would you mind if’, we use the verb in the past tense – ‘borrowed’, but that’s just a grammar rule – we’re still asking for permission for the future. Alright, these are the differences between ‘could’ and ‘would’, and if you’re ready, it’s now time for the test. There are eight sentences on the screen. In each one, I want you to choose the correct word – ‘could’ or ‘would’. Stop the video, think about your answers, then play the video again and check. Alright, here are the answers. Let me know how many you got correct in the comments.
Views: 996722 Learn English Lab
ARTICLES: Indefinite & Definite
 
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Brief teaching on the purpose and usage of articles with examples for practice
Best Preposition Trick Ever | You Won't Believe | By Dear Sir (Part-1)
 
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In this video we are going to teach you best way to learn prepositions for any competitive examination and Spoken English. We have covered all uses of prepositions in a single video (Part-1), this will help candidates to improve their knowledge and skills. What we have covered in first part:- 1. Use of “On”. 2. Use of “Onto”. 3. Use of “Upon”. Most of the candidates in examination center tick the wrong answer just because of less knowledge of prepositions. Watch this video till end and we guaranty your success. - Learn Something New in English :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrnHPBcOqMkGTQhU9FMzmpU14CXAH1e0 - 5 words से 50 words याद करे (English Spoken) :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrnHPBcOqMkwXRBi2evTz9asvYKGTRVe - Narration Full Series in Hindi :- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLhrnHPBcOqMm4su03vSKzS-86R-mLk2bk Follow us at:- 1. Facebook:- https://www.facebook.com/officialdearsir 2. Instagram :- @dearsirofficial or click the link (https://www.instagram.com/dearsirofficial/ ) 3. Twitter :- https://twitter.com/officialdearsir 4. Google + :- https://plus.google.com/112639214993693696602 Don’t forget to suggest our channel to someone who needs it :- https://www.youtube.com/dearsir -----Thank You for Watching----- Team “Dear Sir”
Views: 2367756 Dear Sir
Basic English Grammar: Parts of Speech – noun, verb, adjective, pronoun, adverb...
 
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In this video, I will go over the different parts of speech in English. We will be looking at the use of nouns, pronouns, adjectives, verbs, and adverbs. You will also learn how to arrange them in a grammatically correct sentence. Also, I will teach you in what order to place the adjectives if you have more than one. For example, do you have a "big, white, excitable dog" or a "white, excitable, big dog"? Find out by watching this lesson and doing the quiz afterwards at https://www.engvid.com/basic-english-grammar-parts-of-speech/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. James from engVid. I would like to talk about something that will help you understand English, and it's two things. Number one are parts of speech. What are the parts of speech and how do you use them? The second is called syntax, which is a very complicated word for word order. Where do you put the words in a sentence? In some languages they have a different word order, some languages it doesn't really matter, but what my job today is, is to show you where the words go and: What do they basically mean-okay-in the parts of speech? As E said: "Words. Where do they go?" Now, if you're new to English or even if you're an intermediate student, sometimes this causes you problems. Right? You've heard the terms: "preposition", "determiner", "syntax", and you're like: "Oh, it's so complicated." Today's lesson will be simple. You can go over this again and again. It will help you understand and use English better. So I'm going to start off with the most basic part of parts of speech, and I want to start with the things part. Things. Not actions, but things. I am a person. My watch is a thing. Okay? An animal, a cat or a dog, or an apple, these are things. We call these things nouns, because nouns name people - Hi, I'm James; places - Toronto, Ontario; things - my watch; animals - a cat, meow; and food - an apple. Okay? These are nouns. Example: boy, dog, apple. Okay? Nouns name these things. But sometimes you don't want to keep using the same noun again and again. "James ate the apple and James walked his dog as James talked to his friend, Oliver, and then James..." It gets what we call repetitive and boring, and it also makes the sentences go really slow. And sometimes we want to use the noun in a different way. So in this case we introduce what's called pronouns. Pronouns can replace nouns in a sentence. So now you could say something like this: "James ate the apple and he walked his dog." Instead of: "James ate the apple and James walked his dog", we can use a pronoun to replace it and make it simpler. We still know we're talking about James. Now, we talked about word order or syntax. Let me explain this. In order to use a pronoun first you must use the noun. Okay? You introduce the noun and then you can replace it with a pronoun. That's why you see number one then number two. You cannot just start with a pronoun. If I started a sentence at the beginning: "He went to the store." The very first thing you will say to me is: "Who's he?" I go: "Oh, James went to the store and he bought the apples there." And you go: "Oh, now I know who he is." So, pronouns kind of number two because you have to actually introduce first with a noun, then you can replace it with a pronoun. Now, we have several types of pronouns. I'm just going to go over and show you a couple of them so you get an idea. Pronouns include: "I", "we", which are subject pronouns. Object pronouns when we're talking about something that's not us, but something on the other side that receives action, as a subject pronoun I do things. I run. Right? We eat dinner. We're talking to them. Now, when we say "them", you go: "What?" Well, they are receiving it and we call those object pronouns. Okay? So the most basic ones are subject and object pronouns. One is doing something, one is receiving. There are reflexive pronouns, like: "himself" where somebody is talking about themselves. "He built the house himself." So he's talking about him as an object, but reflecting it back to himself. We call it reflexive pronoun. Okay? There are others, but I'm not going to get into them right now because I want to keep this simple just so you know what the parts of speech are, and you can always come to engVid to come and see other lessons in which we go deeply into reflexive pronouns, object and subject pronouns. Okay? Cool. So we talked about how pronouns can replace nouns, and we're good with that. Yeah? So let's go to stage number three, because once you've replaced them, how do you know the difference between them? Apple, apple. I don't know. That's when we have adjectives. Adjectives. The word itself can be broken into two parts: "ject" and "ad". But remember... Do you remember when I said subject and object, and I gave you the example? I said, for instance: "I" is a subject pronoun. Right? Subject, yeah, I'm good at this.
Adjectives for Kids | Language Arts Video Lesson
 
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Learn about adjectives in this language arts lesson for kids. There is also a fun kids quiz at the end of the adjectives video, so be sure and pay attention so you are able to get them right! ❤ Homeschool Pop? Join our team and get tattoos here: http://homeschoolpop.com Special thanks to Kanchan Singh for the idea of this adjectives video! Thanks for watching this Homeschool Pop video! Be sure and subscribe for more videos, comment and let us know what you think, and join Team Pop! Adjectives for Kids | Language Arts Video Lesson Adjectives Adjectives for kids language arts video lesson language arts adjectives first grade adjectives second grade adjectives school house rock adjectives song
Views: 376469 Homeschool Pop
Instantly improve your English with 3 easy words!
 
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Improve how you sound in English by mastering when these three words are used! I've met thousands of English learners at all levels. Most of them, even the advanced students, make mistakes with the words "a", "the", and "to". These are some of the most common words we use, so in this lesson I'm going to teach you how we use these words. I don't want to look just at grammar; I want you to understand these words and why we use them. If you're an advanced English student, this will be a great review for you. If you're a beginner, try to understand this and save yourself years of English mistakes. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/instantly-improve-your-english-with-3-easy-words/ TRANSCRIPT Doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo-doo. The things I do for love. There's not a thing... Hi. James from engVid. Today's lesson is about instantly improving. Now, I know... "Instant", what does that mean? People say it all the time. I want to show you a little trick that will make your English sound better instantly, and I will give you a technique that you can use after to help practice this. What I have found are students have a mistake or make a mistake when they drop these three words, and because of that I know you're not a native speaker. But today I'm going to address that, show you the three words... Okay? Explain why, and then I will give you a technique that you can use at home soon as you go back over this video or any video to practice it, and you will get instantly better. 10-20%. Okay? Want to know what I'm talking about? Let's go to the board and look at something you've learned, but today you're going to understand. You ready? So, Mr. E said: "Which three words can help you sound like a native speaker?" I'm going to help you a little bit by doing this, and then we're going to go to the board. The words I'm talking about, and you might not consider them words but they are words are: "a" or "an"... Okay, and I consider that one word because it's modified. Right? "The" and "to". Of course you're going to say: "Yeah, James, we know all these. We learned this at beginner, so how does that instantly help me improve my English?" The problem is this: When a person knows something they will talk, when they understand they will change their behaviour or they will use the information. Many students know about articles and the preposition "to", but they actually don't use them in sentences. Many times I've heard students go... Say: "I need to go work tonight." Soon as you say that I know you're not a native speaker. Or if they say: "I bought car yesterday" or "I bought food..." Not "some food". "I bought apple yesterday at the store." I'm like: "A-... You mean an apple, right?" They don't think to say it, because they know: "Teacher, you know what I'm saying." And I go: "Yeah, I know what you're saying, but the way you said it I know English is not your first language." So what I want to do is get you to come back to understanding, not just knowing why these words are important, the fact that, especially with the articles we're going to talk about, they are in most of the sentences. You can almost not get by a sentence without using them. So let's go to the board and take a look. First, what is an article? Well, you'll see an article is the letter "a" or "an". Quickly on that one, "an" is used when we have a vowel sound, sound... Not a... Not just a vowel. So when you say: "A apple", we know "a" and "a" make it difficult for us to actually get it out and for you to understand, so we add: "an" to put a consonant to make it easier for the listener. "I want an apple." Oh, okay, cool. How about "hour"? Teacher, that has an "h" in front of it. I'm like: "Enh?" But we say: "hour", we don't say: "h-our", because with "a" we have to say: "an hour", and that once again tells me one hour. You keep noticing I keep saying "one". I'll explain in a second. Now, this is what we call and indefinite article. I.e. it's not special. When I say to you: "I want a marker", a marker. All right? I'm talking about this. See this? They're all basically the same. I don't care what type of marker. "A" just means generally speaking marker. That's why it's indefinite; it's not special. When we look at the word "the", "the" is special. In this case, when I say to you: "I want the marker", which one do you think I'm talking about? Can you see the difference? Clearly. Even if you don't know, you would look and see four, and see this and go: "He's probably talking about this one." So with a definite article what's happening is someone is being very specific. Well, there are two things. They could say something is special or something is specific. Okay? And here we have definite article is "the". "Tell the man I like him." Okay? "Tell the man", in this case both of us have to know what you're talking about, because if there are 10 men you'll go: "Which man?"
Transitive vs Intransitive Verbs┃I'm Breaking vs It's Broken
 
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Watch the LONGER lesson on Patreon *More example sentences, more grammar points to learn* - https://bit.ly/2qIvPkA This time we'll learn what transitive & intransitive are and how to use them correctly. ★ It's open vs I'm opening it. ☆ My computer is broken. vs I'm breaking my computer. ★ The light turned on / off. ☆ Don't use the word "fall" around students?! Other forms you should learn: しまう / ちゃう form. てしまう / ちゃう lesson ⇓ https://youtu.be/UGCg-9CTMMY ★☆★NEW JAPANESE AMMO SHOP★☆★ https://teespring.com/stores/japaneseammo (US / CANADA / INTERNATIONAL) https://teespring.com/stores/japanese-ammo-uk-eu (UK / EU / INTERNATIONAL) ★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★☆★ Please don't forget to SUBSCRIBE and LIKE the videos :) I read all the comments and I appreciate them all xx ********************************************** SUBSCRIBE to our Newsletter!!! ☆ More Japanese lessons exclusively for subscribers http://bit.ly/1YldZgu ********************************************** Join my kawaii gang on FB: https://www.facebook.com/japaneseammo/ Twitter lessons! Talk to me @japaneseammo https://twitter.com/japaneseammo Instagram @japaneseammo_misa https://www.instagram.com/japaneseammo_misa/ Read more articles on the grammar - http://www.japaneseammo.com/