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Oxford University Now Diversifying Its Curriculum!
 
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http://www.goforbroke.com/ Oxford University has introduced a mandatory exam on ethnic minority history to diversify its 'overly white’ curriculum Making A Change News - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4550620/Oxford-University-exam-anger-white-curriculum.html Cast: • Hosted by Tiffany Del Real • Commentary by: Joe Jo, Bart Kwan, Geo Antoinette, Julia Chow, Michael Chiu • Edited by Sean D. Nguyen: http://twitter.com/seandnguyen Submit JKNews Articles Here: http://tinyurl.com/justkiddingnews --- FOLLOW THE CREW: • Joe Jo: https://instagram.com/joe_joverdose • Bart Kwan: http://instagram.com/bartkwan • Geo Antoinette: http://instagram.com/Geo_Antoinette • Casey Chan: http://instagram.com/chanmanprod • Julia Chow: http://instagram.com/xblueapplez • Michael Chiu: http://instagram.com/mchiu11 • Tiffany Del Real: http://instagram.com/real_tiff • Brandon Choi: http://instagram.com/bchoii • Josh Osei: http://instagram.com/dubhalo • Sean D. Nguyen: http://instagram.com/seandnguyen SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNELS • JUST KIDDING FILMS: http://youtube.com/justkiddingfilms • JUST KIDDING PARTY: http://youtube.com/justkiddingparty • JUST KIDDING GAMER: http://youtube.com/justkiddinggamer • ASK THE FEELS: http://youtube.com/askthefeels • JOE'S CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/theuncochin • BART'S CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/bartkwan • GEO'S CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/GeovannaAntoinette • TIFF & CASE'S CHANNEL: http://youtube.com/TiffandCase FOLLOW AND LIKE US HERE: • INSTAGRAM: https://instagram.com/JustKiddingnews • FACEBOOK: http://facebook.com/JustKiddingNews • MERCHANDISE: http://justkiddingfilms.bigcartel.com/
Views: 120387 JustKiddingNews
Oxford University Press | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oxford University Press Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies. Oxford University has used a similar system to oversee OUP since the 17th century. The Press is located on Walton Street, opposite of Somerville College, in the suburb Jericho. The university became involved in the print trade around 1480, and grew into a major printer of Bibles, prayer books, and scholarly works. OUP took on the project that became the Oxford English Dictionary in the late 19th century, and expanded to meet the ever-rising costs of the work. As a result, the last hundred years has seen Oxford publish children's books, school text books, music, journals, the World's Classics series, and a range of English language teaching texts. Moves into international markets led to OUP opening its own offices outside the United Kingdom, beginning with New York City in 1896. With the advent of computer technology and increasingly harsh trading conditions, the Press's printing house at Oxford was closed in 1989, and its former paper mill at Wolvercote was demolished in 2004. By contracting out its printing and binding operations, the modern OUP publishes some 6,000 new titles around the world each year. OUP was first exempted from United States corporation tax in 1972 and from United Kingdom corporation tax in 1978. As a department of a charity, OUP is exempt from income tax and corporate tax in most countries, but may pay sales and other commercial taxes on its products. The OUP today transfers 30% of its annual surplus to the rest of the university, with a commitment to a minimum transfer of £12 million per annum. OUP is the largest university press in the world by the number of publications, publishing more than 6,000 new books every year and employing nearly 6,000 people. OUP publishes many reference, professional, and academic works including the Oxford English Dictionary, the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, the Oxford World's Classics, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and the Concise Dictionary of National Biography. A number of its most important titles are now available electronically in a package called "Oxford Reference Online", and are offered free to holders of a reader's card or other subscribing institutions (e.g. universities, colleges, etc.) worldwide. Books published by Oxford have International Standard Book Numbers that begin with 0–19, making the Press one of a tiny number of publishers who have two-digit identification numbers in the ISBN system. By internal agreement, the first digit of the individual edition number (following 0–19–) can indicate a particular originating division, for example: 3 for music (before ISMNs were defined); 5 for the New York office; 8 for Clarendon Press publications.
Views: 19 wikipedia tts
Twinkle Khanna | Full Address and Q&A | Oxford Union
 
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SUBSCRIBE for more speakers ► http://is.gd/OxfordUnion Oxford Union on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theoxfordunion Oxford Union on Twitter: @OxfordUnion Website: http://www.oxford-union.org/ Twinkle Khanna is an Indian author, newspaper columnist, film producer, former film actress and interior designer. Her first book Mrs Funnybones sold over one hundred thousand copies, making her India's highest-selling female writer of 2015. She repeated the success with her second book, The Legend of Lakshmi Prasad, which also went on to sell over 100,000 copies by August 2017. She won the Crossword Book Award 2016 for Mrs Funnybones. Salaam Noni Appa, a story from the anthology has been adapted into a play directed by Lillette Dubey. She is currently producing a film, Pad Man, based on the life of Muruganatham Arunachalam, this time with a strong focus on dispelling taboos around menstruation, a topic that has never been explored in cinema before. ABOUT THE OXFORD UNION SOCIETY: The Oxford Union is the world's most prestigious debating society, with an unparalleled reputation for bringing international guests and speakers to Oxford. Since 1823, the Union has been promoting debate and discussion not just in Oxford University, but across the globe.
Views: 304582 OxfordUnion
English Articles  -  3 Simple Rules To Fix Common Grammar Mistakes & Errors
 
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Grab the short course for $1! 👇👇👇 Stop making the 10 most common Mistakes English Learners Make! https://www.mmmenglish.com/grammar-challenge/ In this course you’ll practise what you learned in this lesson about English articles with quizzes and worksheets. PLUS, there are 9 more grammar lessons and quizzes to help you practise! This lesson will teach you three simple rules to help you to use English articles better. I KNOW this is a lesson that you need to watch because articles are one of the most complicated parts of English grammar! There are lots of rules and lots of exceptions for using English articles, so in this lesson, I've tried to explain it more clearly for you. There are three English articles - a, an and the. It is also possible to have no article. Using each of these articles changes the meaning of your sentence. Even though articles are a challenging part of speaking English, they are a really important part of English! They give information about the noun they come before. Using articles incorrectly can make your sentences confusing or sound strange! To improve your English fluency and sound more natural you need to use English articles well. To get better exam results, you need to improve the way you use articles - especially in your writing tests! I hope these three simple rules will help you to do that! Read the full transcript to this video on my blog: https://www.mmmenglish.com/2017/07/19/using-english-articles-3-simple-rules-fix-common-grammar-mistakes-errors/ mmmEnglish RECOMMENDS: Grammarly Grammar Checker can help you to use articles better - Get the Grammarly Grammar Checker FREE when you use this link: https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SHp9 Rype - Where Busy People Practice English with real English teachers: https://www.rypeapp.com/ref/mmmEnglish/ English Listening Practice - Try Audible for FREE! http://www.audibletrial.com/mmmEnglish Improve your English pronunciation and speaking skills by practicing with the mmmEnglish Imitation Technique! (SERIES 1) Storytelling: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation/ (SERIES 2) Describing people's personality and behaviour: https://www.mmmenglish.com/imitation-2 CONTACT mmmEnglish: mmmEnglish Website: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglish Find me on Facebook: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishFB Find me on Instagram: http://bit.ly/mmmEnglishInsta Ladies Facebook Group http://bit.ly/LadiesLoveEnglish TweetMe on Twitter: http://bit.ly/TweetMmmEnglish Music Credit: Crimson Fly - Huma-Huma: https://youtu.be/qpxhgby-ONI
Views: 331177 mmmEnglish
How to write an Article (Cambridge First, Advanced; Blogs)
 
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Article writing is a very different style of writing and requires a different approach from the essay. In this lesson, we look at how to write for the Cambridge tests, as well as how to write for the web, including blogs and newsletters. Find out how to use a more playful language to capture a reader’s attention. Need ideas for your essays? Check out our ideas e-book: http://bit.ly/2RIhBjz Find more writing tips at https://writetotop.com/ Want more great videos to help you pass the IELTS or TOEFL Writing Section? Support Write to the Top: https://writetotop.com/product/support-us/ https://paypal.me/writetotop
Views: 180035 Write to Top
How to Improve Your English Writing - English Writing Lesson
 
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Learn some simple but effective ways to improve your English writing in this lesson. You can see the full lesson (which includes the text and a quiz to help you practice) here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/improve-english-writing Improving your English writing is hard. Even native speakers find it difficult to write well in English. However, whatever level your English is, and whatever you're trying to write, there are some simple ways to make your English writing clearer and more natural. You can learn how to: - Plan your English writing and set goals for yourself. - Understand your reader and what he/she wants from your writing. - Organize your writing into paragraphs to make your writing focused. - Write in clear, natural-sounding English without wasting words. See more of our free English lessons here: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/free-english-lessons A big thank you to the Alphabet translation team from Syria for the Arabic captions!
Views: 320402 Oxford Online English
HOW I RESEARCH, PLAN & WRITE ESSAYS IN 3 DAYS • 1ST CLASS/2.1 UNI ESSAY HELP • OXFORD UNIVERSITY
 
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Thank you for watching, please spend a second giving this video a thumbs up and clicking that subscribe button. I hope you enjoyed the video and please do let me know what you think or ask any questions in the comments. If you want to message me directly or follow my Oxford life in a daily blog style then head over to my Instagram (below). Big love! Rosie xxxxxxxxxxxx A B O U T T H I S V I D E O Hey guys! I had a lot of fun getting to grips with my new editing software for this vid so I hope you like the new fancier look I've managed to get going here lol. If any of you have any questions regarding essay writing then please do send me a message or check out my other video explaining how I structure essays (linked in the outro of this video)! S U B S C R I B E - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMgOvlRUnvICWGBwvIpiBWA P R E V I O U S - .............................................................................................................................. S O C I A L M E D I A ✽ snapchat: JustALittle_Roo ✽ twitter: https://twitter.com/JustALittleRoo ✽ instagram: https://www.instagram.com/Just_a_little_roo/ .............................................................................................................................. F A Q s ✽ How old are you? 20 ✽ What do you study? Archaeology and Anthropology ✽ What college are you at? St Peter's College ✽ Where are you from? Greater Manchester ✽ What do you use to film? Canon EOS 200d
Views: 3212 Rosie Crawford
English Verb Tenses Guide - Learn About Simple, Perfect, and Continuous Tenses
 
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Are you confused about your simple, perfect and continuous tenses? Do you know how many verb tenses there are in English? In this lesson, you can get a big picture understanding of English verb tenses. You’ll learn what connects English verb forms, which will make it easier for you to learn and understand verb tenses in English. You can see the full version of this free lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/english-verb-tenses Contents: 1. Overview of English Verb Forms 0:35 2. Past, Present and Future Verb Forms 3:12 3. Simple Verb Forms 5:50 4. Continuous Verb Forms 7:35 5. Perfect Verb Forms 9:33 6. Perfect Continuous Verb Forms 12:39 This lesson will help you: - Understand the main differences between the simple, continuous, and perfect tenses. - Learn the correct verb forms in each tense. - See the difference between the verb tense forms and their actual meanings. - See simple verb forms in detail. - Understand the different continuous verb forms. - Detail the correct perfect verb forms. - Learn about the perfect continuous tense and its verb forms. To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/
Views: 196776 Oxford Online English
A guide to Harvard Referencing
 
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Jonny, a student at the University of Derby, explains Harvard Referencing. He discusses how to use citations and how to reference different sources such as books, journals and websites. http://www.derby.ac.uk/studyskills http://www.derby.ac.uk/library/study-skills/citing-and-referencing
Views: 651441 University of Derby
So Cambridge Uni Is The 'WORST' For POOR Students? Let's SPILL THE TEA!
 
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Spilling The Tea On My Degree RETURNS in reaction to The Guardian & The Times calling out Cambridge for it's lack of helping with disadvantaged, low income students. Read the articles here and let me know what you think? Can Cambridge help or...AINT NOBODY GOT TIME FOR DAT!!?? Guardian article...https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/apr/05/cambridge-ranked-last-in-university-fair-access-table Times article...https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/cambridge-and-oxford-among-worst-universities-for-state-school-intake-5f3hrq3fx Behind The Scenes Of Youtube: @IBZMO - Snapchat @IBZMO - Twitter @IBZMO - Instagram FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/IbzMoYoutube... ____________________________________ Business Enquiries Only: [email protected]
Views: 50964 Ibz Mo
Why your Personal Statement may get rejected (from Oxford, Sussex, Greenwich and Bangor university)
 
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Admissions tutors reveal what makes them reject a personal statement. READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/content.php?r=26328-How-to-write-an-excellent-personal-statement-in-10-steps
Views: 319038 thestudentroom
Oxford Journals Archive: Scholarship That Shaped Today’s World
 
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Discover historic scholarship from the Oxford Journals Archive. This includes articles by Nobel Laureates, from Alexander Fleming to Elinor Ostrom. https://academic.oup.com/journals/archive Explore each article in full: 1. Charles Darwin & Alfred Wallace (1858) - On the Tendency of Species to form Varieties; and on the Perpetuation of Varieties and Species by Natural Means of Selection - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1096-3642.1858.tb02500.x 2. J.R.R. Tolkien (1925) – Some Contributions to Middle-English Lexicography - https://doi.org/10.1093/res/os-I.2.210 3. Mahatma Gandhi (1931) – The Future of India - https://doi.org/10.2307/3015844 4. Alexander Fleming (1944) – The Discovery of Penicillin - https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordjournals.bmb.a071032 5. Rita Levi-Montalcini (1957) - Some Trends in Research on Cellular Differentiation and Morphogenesis - https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/19.4.609 6. James Watson & Francis Crick (1974) – A Representation of the Structure of DNA - https://doi.org/10.2307/1296670 7. Elinor Ostrom (1995) – Self-Organization and Social Capital - https://doi.org/10.1093/icc/4.1.131 © Oxford University Press
Oxford University Science Area | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Science_Area,_Oxford 00:00:12 1 Overview 00:00:55 2 History 00:01:54 3 Redevelopment 00:02:22 4 Departments 00:03:14 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7819817773540116 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Oxford University Science Area in Oxford, England, is where most of the science departments at the University of Oxford are located.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
University of Oxford | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: University of Oxford Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two 'ancient universities' are frequently jointly referred to as 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.The university is made up of 38 constituent colleges, and a range of academic departments which are organised into four divisions. All the colleges are self-governing institutions within the university, each controlling its own membership and with its own internal structure and activities. It does not have a main campus, and its buildings and facilities are scattered throughout the city centre. Undergraduate teaching at Oxford is organised around weekly tutorials at the colleges and halls, supported by classes, lectures, seminars, and laboratory work provided by university faculties and departments; some postgraduate teaching includes tutorials organised by faculties and departments. It operates the world's oldest university museum, as well as the largest university press in the world and the largest academic library system nationwide. The university is consistently cited as among the world's best.Oxford has educated many notable alumni, including 29 Nobel laureates, 27 prime ministers of the United Kingdom and many heads of state and government around the world. As of 2017, 69 Nobel Prize winners, 3 Fields Medalists, and 6 Turing Award winners have studied, worked, or held visiting fellowships at the University of Oxford. Its alumni have won 160 Olympic medals. Oxford is the home of the Rhodes Scholarship, one of the world's oldest international scholarships.
Views: 53 wikipedia tts
Oxford University Computing Services | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_University_Computing_Services 00:01:32 1 History 00:02:37 2 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8990473292400741 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS) until 2012 provided the central Information Technology services for the University of Oxford. The service was based at 7-19 Banbury Road in central north Oxford, England, near the junction with Keble Road. OUCS became part of IT Services, when the new department was created at the University of Oxford on 1 August 2012 through a merger of the three previous central IT departments: Oxford University Computing Services (OUCS), Business Services and Projects (BSP) and ICT Support Team (ICTST).At the time when Oxford University Computing Services ceased to operate as an independent department, it offered facilities, training and advice to members of the University in all aspects of academic computing. OUCS was responsible for the core networks reaching all departments and colleges of Oxford University. OUCS was made up of 5 technical and one administration group. Each group had responsibility for different aspects of OUCS services supplied to the University. At the time of the merger, the 5 technical groups were: Learning Technologies, Information and Support, Network Systems Management Services, Infrastructure Systems and Services Group, and Network and Telecommunications.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Oxford Journals Archive: Unlocking Landmark Scholarship
 
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Discover the Oxford Journals Archive – over 1 million articles of influential scholarship, all in one online resource. https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/access_purchase/oxford_journals_archive The Oxford Journals Archive comprises the backfiles of over 250 journals across five subject archives: Medicine, Science, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Law. It includes the earliest content available through to the end of 1995. Content from 1996 right up to the present day is included in the Oxford Journals Collection. © Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oxford University Press Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Oxford University Press (OUP) is the largest university press in the world, and the second oldest after Cambridge University Press. It is a department of the University of Oxford and is governed by a group of 15 academics appointed by the vice-chancellor known as the delegates of the press. They are headed by the secretary to the delegates, who serves as OUP's chief executive and as its major representative on other university bodies. Oxford University has used a similar system to oversee OUP since the 17th century. The Press is located on Walton Street, opposite of Somerville College, in the suburb Jericho. The university became involved in the print trade around 1480, and grew into a major printer of Bibles, prayer books, and scholarly works. OUP took on the project that became the Oxford English Dictionary in the late 19th century, and expanded to meet the ever-rising costs of the work. As a result, the last hundred years has seen Oxford publish children's books, school text books, music, journals, the World's Classics series, and a range of English language teaching texts. Moves into international markets led to OUP opening its own offices outside the United Kingdom, beginning with New York City in 1896. With the advent of computer technology and increasingly harsh trading conditions, the Press's printing house at Oxford was closed in 1989, and its former paper mill at Wolvercote was demolished in 2004. By contracting out its printing and binding operations, the modern OUP publishes some 6,000 new titles around the world each year. OUP was first exempted from United States corporation tax in 1972 and from United Kingdom corporation tax in 1978. As a department of a charity, OUP is exempt from income tax and corporate tax in most countries, but may pay sales and other commercial taxes on its products. The OUP today transfers 30% of its annual surplus to the rest of the university, with a commitment to a minimum transfer of £12 million per annum. OUP is the largest university press in the world by the number of publications, publishing more than 6,000 new books every year and employing nearly 6,000 people. OUP publishes many reference, professional, and academic works including the Oxford English Dictionary, the Concise Oxford English Dictionary, the Oxford World's Classics, the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and the Concise Dictionary of National Biography. A number of its most important titles are now available electronically in a package called "Oxford Reference Online", and are offered free to holders of a reader's card or other subscribing institutions (e.g. universities, colleges, etc.) worldwide. Books published by Oxford have International Standard Book Numbers that begin with 0–19, making the Press one of a tiny number of publishers who have two-digit identification numbers in the ISBN system. By internal agreement, the first digit of the individual edition number (following 0–19–) can indicate a particular originating division, for example: 3 for music (before ISMNs were defined); 5 for the New York office; 8 for Clarendon Press publications.
Views: 25 wikipedia tts
How to use the Oxford Research Encyclopedias
 
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Learn how to get the most out of the Oxford Research Encyclopedias including tips for search, navigation, filters, citations, and more. Start your research at http://oxford.ly/2mSguwD The Oxford Research Encyclopedia (ORE) program is Oxford's most ambitious project in decades: a forthcoming dynamic, online reference series in over 20 disciplines that is continuously updated through the active participation of the world’s leading experts. © Oxford University Press
Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Economics and Finance
 
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Led by Jonathan H. Hamilton, the ORE of Economics and Finance will provide overviews of established ideas in the field and articles will appear online first in a discoverable environment. Follow the progress of the ORE of Economics and Finance at http://economics.oxfordre.com/ Through the Oxford Research Encyclopedia (ORE) program, Oxford is building online encyclopedias in over 20 disciplines, powered by the world's leading scholars, scientists, and researchers. With expert editors and peer-review, the ORE project will combine the discoverability of digital with the standards of academic publishing. © Oxford University Press
Oxford Subject Resources: Answers for every question along the Research Journey
 
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Find out how subject resources from Oxford University Press can help your users find more in-depth articles about projects they’re working on. Oxford University Press offers a number of online, discipline specific resources for your users, with articles across a range of fields such as the arts, religion, and African American studies. These resources provide comprehensive and specialized guides to different subject areas, with thousands of articles covering a range of topics and sub-fields. http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com http://www.oxfordartonline.com http://www.oxfordaasc.com/ http://www.oxfordbiblicalstudies.com/ http://www.oxfordislamicstudies.com/ © Oxford University Press
A Guide to Oxford Music Online
 
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Oxford Music Online is the gateway offering users the ability to access and cross-search multiple music reference resources in one location. With Grove Music Online as its cornerstone, Oxford Music Online also contains The Oxford Companion to Music (revised 2011), which offers more than 8,000 articles on composers, performers, conductors, instruments and notation, forms and genres, and individual works; and The Oxford Dictionary of Music, 2nd edition (revised 2006), which supplements Grove's more-extensive articles with content geared toward undergraduates and general users. Both of these sources are included in subscriptions to Grove Music Online. Discover more at http://www.oxfordmusiconline.com (c) Oxford University Press
Oxford University Department of Computer Science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_of_Computer_Science,_University_of_Oxford 00:00:51 1 Teaching 00:02:31 2 Research 00:03:42 3 Notable faculty 00:05:07 4 History 00:07:44 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9592205293492322 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Department of Computer Science is the computer science department of the University of Oxford, England, which is part of the university's Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division. It was founded in 1957 as the Computing Laboratory. By 2014 the staff count was 52 members of academic staff and over 80 research staff. The 2015 QS World University Subject Rankings places Oxford 3rd in the world for Computer Science (after MIT & Stanford) and 1st in Europe with Cambridge in 7th. Oxford is also the top university for computer science in the UK and Europe according to Business Insider and was ranked 2nd for Computer Science and Information Systems (after Cambridge) in the 2016 Guardian University league tables.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Oxford Research Encyclopedia: Education
 
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Led by George W. Noblit, the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Education provides overviews and articles written by leading scholars in the field. Follow the progress of the ORE of Education at http://education.oxfordre.com/ (c) Oxford University Press
Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Answers for Questions along the Research Journey
 
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Find out how Oxford Research Encyclopedias can help your users find in-depth articles across a range of disciplines. http://oxfordre.com/ Oxford Research Encyclopedias provide your users with long-form overview articles and multimedia content across over 20 disciplines. They help to contextualize topics within existing scholarship, addressing both foundational and cutting-edge ideas, and inform all levels of academic research. © Oxford University Press
UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
 
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UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university located in Oxford, England, United ...... More information on famous senior and junior members of the university can be found in the individual college articles. An individual may be ...
Views: 18 EDU SYLBD
UK library access to Oxford University Press online resources: 2012
 
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This short demo shows you how to get free online access to the Oxford English Dictionary and other leading Oxford University Press reference resources by using your UK public library card.
Finding a known journal or journal article (Oxford)
 
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Want to know how to find a journal or article from an Oxford style reference? Check out this video! This video was funded by the Commonwealth Government through the Higher Education Participation Program.
Views: 1171 Deakin Library
How to Use Oxford Handbooks Online
 
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The Oxford Handbook Series brings together the world's leading scholars to write review essays that evaluate the current thinking on a field or topic, and make an original argument about the future direction of the debate. Oxford Handbook articles review the key issues, reveal original arguments and concepts, and set the agenda for new research. The Handbooks have become one of the most successful and cited series within scholarly publishing, and for the first time, the entire collection of work across 14 subject areas is available online. Discover more at http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com. (c) Oxford University Press
The ERA-EDTA Journals app
 
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Download the app for free: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/era-edta-journals/id1215562765?mt=8 The ERA-EDTA Journals app enables you to read issues of Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation (ndt) and Clinical Kidney Journal (ckj) wherever you are, even offline. Download articles, bookmark your favourite articles, and easily browse full issues by swiping through articles. Available for free from The App Store. ndt and ckj are the official journals of the ERA-EDTA, publishing leading nephrology research from authors in over 40 different countries. Find out more at: http://academic.oup.com/era-edta © Oxford University Press
Oxford University | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Oxford University Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The University of Oxford is a collegiate research university in Oxford, England. There is evidence of teaching as far back as 1096, making it the oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's second-oldest university in continuous operation. It grew rapidly from 1167 when Henry II banned English students from attending the University of Paris. After disputes between students and Oxford townsfolk in 1209, some academics fled north-east to Cambridge where they established what became the University of Cambridge. The two 'ancient universities' are frequently jointly referred to as 'Oxbridge'. The history and influence of the University of Oxford has made it one of the most prestigious universities in the world.The university is made up of 38 constituent colleges, and a range of academic departments which are organised into four divisions. All the colleges are self-governing institutions within the university, each controlling its own membership and with its own internal structure and activities. It does not have a main campus, and its buildings and facilities are scattered throughout the city centre. Undergraduate teaching at Oxford is organised around weekly tutorials at the colleges and halls, supported by classes, lectures, seminars, and laboratory work provided by university faculties and departments; some postgraduate teaching includes tutorials organised by faculties and departments. It operates the world's oldest university museum, as well as the largest university press in the world and the largest academic library system nationwide. The university is consistently cited as among the world's best.Oxford has educated many notable alumni, including 29 Nobel laureates, 27 prime ministers of the United Kingdom and many heads of state and government around the world. As of 2017, 69 Nobel Prize winners, 3 Fields Medalists, and 6 Turing Award winners have studied, worked, or held visiting fellowships at the University of Oxford. Its alumni have won 160 Olympic medals. Oxford is the home of the Rhodes Scholarship, one of the world's oldest international scholarships.
Views: 50 wikipedia tts
Oxford University Scientific Society | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_University_Scientific_Society 00:01:00 1 History 00:05:21 2 People Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9655392576433216 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Oxford University Scientific Society (OUSS) is a student scientific society at the University of Oxford. It was founded in 1882 as the Oxford University Junior Scientific Club. It is one of the oldest undergraduate science societies in the world. It organizes talks on scientific subjects on a weekly basis. Former speakers include Nobel prize laureates (John E. Walker, Peter Mansfield) and other well-known scientists (Roger Penrose).OUSS also organizes visits to places of scientific interest, which have included tours of the Bodleian Library, Museum of the History of Science, TOAD distillery in Oxford, the Joint European Torus project, and the National Space Centre in Leicester. In April 2012 they held a large-scale debate on gerontology at the Sheldonian Theatre between Aubrey de Grey and Colin Blakemore, chaired by Sir Richard Peto.
Views: 2 wikipedia tts
Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Department_of_Biochemistry,_University_of_Oxford 00:00:30 1 History 00:03:46 2 Research 00:04:22 3 Academic staff 00:05:25 4 Buildings Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7309652621381799 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Department of Biochemistry of Oxford University is located in the Science Area in Oxford, England. It is one of the largest biochemistry departments in Europe. The Biochemistry Department is part of the University of Oxford's Medical Sciences Division, the largest of the University's four academic divisions and ranked first in the world for biomedicine.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Oxford Reference: Answers for every question along the research journey
 
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Find out how Oxford Reference can help your users quickly check a fact or expand their research on any topic. http://www.oxfordreference.com/ Oxford Reference provides your users with carefully vetted information, ranging from short, general reference entries for quick facts, through to more in-depth articles on specialised subjects. Find millions of articles on a vast range of topics. © Oxford University Press
The Oxford Index
 
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A free discovery service, the Oxford Index lets you search across Oxford's digital academic content with a single click, and find related content every step of the way. http://oxfordindex.oup.com/ The Oxford Index, a free search and discovery tool from Oxford University Press, is designed to help you begin your research journey by providing a single, convenient search portal for trusted scholarship from Oxford and our partners, and then point you to the most relevant related materials -- from journal articles to scholarly monographs. One search brings together top quality content and unlocks connections in a way not previously possible. The Oxford Index contains a cross-searchable set of nearly a million 'index cards,' each representing a single article, chapter, journal, or book. Index pages display key information (including abstracts and keywords) about an item, helping you to judge the relevance of that content to your research. (c) Oxford University Press.
Oxford Handbooks Online: Scholarly Research Reviews
 
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The Oxford Handbook Series brings together the world's leading scholars to write review essays that evaluate the current thinking on a field or topic, and make an original argument about the future direction of the debate. http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com Articles review the key issues, reveal original arguments and concepts, and set the agenda for new research. The Handbooks have become one of the most successful and cited series within scholarly publishing, and for the first time, the entire collection of work across 14 subject areas is available online. Discover more at http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com (c) Oxford University Press 2013.
A Day in the Life: Oxford Student
 
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Oxford student Paul Ostwald is a budding journalist and co-founder of 'The Journal of Interrupted Studies'. If you want to study at Oxford, apply for a free education assessment here: http://bit.ly/http://bit.ly/oxford_student_DITL Crimson Education is the world leader in global admissions consulting. Paul is graduating from Oxford with a degree in Politics, Philosophy and Economics (PPE), one of Oxford's best known degrees. Follow a day in Paul's life at Oxford! Check out more about the Journal of Interrupted Studies on the following website: http://www.jis-oxford.co.uk/ Subscribe To "Crimson Education" Channel HERE: http://bit.ly/hit_subscribe_crimsoneducation Follow Crimson Education on Instagram: http://bit.ly/follow_us_on_instagram_crimsoneducation Learn More about Crimson Education here: http://bit.ly/Learnmoreaboutcrimson Book a free consultation with one of our academic advisors: http://bit.ly/Letstalkcrimsoneducation Disclosure: We are in no way affiliated with Oxford University.
Views: 749654 Crimson Education
Oxford Research Encyclopedias: Anthropology
 
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The Oxford Research Encyclopedia program is Oxford’s most ambitious project in decades: a forthcoming dynamic, online reference series in over 20 disciplines that is continuously updated through the active participation of leading experts. Articles will provide overviews of established ideas in the field and will appear online first in a discoverable environment—radically reversing the traditional publishing model of “print to digital.” © Oxford University Press
An Open Access Webcast from Library Journal and Oxford University Press
 
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Library Journal and Oxford University Press present a webcast titled Open Access: Looking Back at Ten Years of Open Access Publishing. http://lj.libraryjournal.com/ Panellists are Rhodri Jackson (publisher for law journals and Oxford Open at OUP), David Crotty (senior editor at OUP), and Janet Kelso, associate editor for Database: The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation. The speakers discuss key moments in Open Access publishing, approaches to managing Open Access journals, and issues of funding and policy. © Oxford University Press
Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, University of Oxford | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divisions_of_the_University_of_Oxford 00:00:25 1 Humanities Division 00:01:40 2 Medical Sciences Division 00:03:33 3 Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division (MPLS) 00:04:43 4 Social Sciences Division Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8431115885315608 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The various academic faculties, departments, and institutes of the University of Oxford are organised into four divisions, each with its own Head and elected board. They are the Humanities Division; the Social Sciences Division; the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division; and the Medical Sciences Division.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Articles (a, an, the) - Lesson 1 - 7 Rules For Using Articles Correctly - English Grammar
 
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In this lesson, learn the 7 rules for using articles in English correctly. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Hello and welcome. In this lesson, I will teach you the seven rules that you need to know for using articles in English correctly. Articles are the words ‘a’, ‘an’, and ‘the’. There is a final quiz at the end of the lesson for you to test your understanding. OK, the first rule is about where to use ‘a’ and where to use ‘an’. So rule number one is use ‘a’ before a consonant sound, and ‘an’ before a vowel sound. So in all of these words – you see that they start with a consonant sound. Cat starts with /k/, dog starts with /d/, boy with /b/, girl with /g/, house with /h/ and tree with /t/. So we say ‘a cat’, ‘a dog’, ‘a boy’, ‘a girl’, ‘a house’, ‘a tree’ etc. Notice that in natural speech, we don’t say ‘a’, we say ‘uh’ – like ‘a cat’. In this next set of words, you see that, they all start with a vowel sound – apple starts with /ae/, engineer starts with /e/, ice-cream with /ai/, old with /o/, umbrella with /uh/. So we say ‘an apple’, ‘an engineer’, ‘an ice-cream cone’, ‘an old womman’, ‘an umbrella’ and so on. In speech, we don’t say ‘an’, we say /ən/. Let’s do a small exercise. You see ten items on the screen. For each one, I want you to say if you would use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before it. Stop the video, think about it, then play the video again and check. OK here are the answers. Did you get them all right? I want to focus on items number seven to ten because these are a little tricky. Number seven is ‘a university’ because even though ‘university’ starts with the letter ‘u’ the first sound of the word is not a vowel sound. We don’t say /ooniversity/. We say /yoo-nə- vər-si-ty/ so that first sound is a /y/ sound, which a consonant sound, so we say ‘a university.’ Number eight is similar. The word ‘European’ starts with a /y/ sound, so ‘a European tour.’ In number nine, the spelling has an ‘h’ at the start but that ‘h’ is silent. We don’t say /hau-ər/, we say /au-ər/. The first sound is an /au/ sound which is a vowel sound, so this is ‘an hour’. In the same way, in number ten, we say MA. ‘M’ starts with an /e/ sound which is again a vowel sound, so ‘an MA in English’. OK let’s move on to rule number two: Use ‘a’ and ‘an’ ONLY with singular, countable nouns. We say that a noun is countable if we can count it – one, two, three, four etc. All of these words on the screen are countable. We can say one elephant, three cars, ten teachers, five hundred onions and so on. Now if you talk about one person or thing, like one elephant or one car, then that’s called a singular noun and if you say ten teachers or five hundred onions, those are called plural nouns. Uncountable nouns cannot be counted in this way. Nouns like water, sugar, milk, love, anger, knowledge are some examples. If you think about it, you cannot say “I drank four waters” or “I want eight milks”. To a person, you can say “I love you” but you can’t say “I have five loves for you” – that doesn’t make any sense. So these are all uncountable. Alright, so the rule is - you can only use ‘a’ and ‘an’ if you’re talking about one person or one thing. Let’s do another quick exercise. Here are ten items again. This time, you see ‘a’ or ‘an’ before the nouns, but some of these are wrong. They should NOT have ‘a’ or ‘an’ before them. Stop the video, identify the mistakes, then play the video again and check. OK, here are the answers. Number three is wrong because ‘shirts’ is a plural and you cannot use ‘a’ or ‘an’ before a plural noun. Number five is wrong because ‘happiness’ is uncountable, so again, ‘a’ or ‘an’ cannot be used there. The same goes for number six – water is uncountable. Number nine is wrong because ‘doctors’ is a plural – you can say ‘a doctor’ but not ‘a doctors’. And finally, in number ten, advice is an uncountable noun – so you cannot ask for ‘an advice’. Now a quick note here: the article ‘the’ can be used with all kinds of nouns – singular or plural countable nouns, and uncountable nouns. OK, so let’s now talk about how to choose between ‘a’ or ‘an’ and ‘the’. Here’s rule number three: Use ‘a’ or ‘an’ to talk about a person or thing unknown to your listener. And use ‘the’ to talk about a person or thing known to your listener. For example, “My sister has two computers: a PC and a laptop. The PC is quite old but the laptop is brand new.” I say ‘a PC’ and ‘a laptop’ because that’s the first time I’m mentioning the two computers. That is, until this point, they are unknown to you, the listener.
Views: 1013100 Learn English Lab
Oxford Internet Institute | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxford_Internet_Institute 00:01:09 1 Research 00:02:44 1.1 Studies of Wikipedia 00:04:00 2 Teaching 00:04:57 3 History 00:05:47 4 Faculty 00:06:23 5 OII awards 00:06:39 5.1 Lifetime achievement awards winners 00:07:24 5.2 Internet and society awards 00:08:10 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9966472727282616 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-F "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Oxford Internet Institute (OII) is a multi-disciplinary department of social and computer science dedicated to the study of information, communication, and technology, and is part of the Social Sciences Division of the University of Oxford, England. It is housed over three sites on St Giles in Oxford, including a primary site at 1 St Giles, owned by Balliol College. The department undertakes research and teaching devoted to understanding life online, with the aim of shaping Internet research, policy, and practice. Founded in 2001, the OII has tracked the Internet's development and use, aiming to shed light on individual, collective and institutional behaviour online. The department brings together academics from a wide range of disciplines including political science, sociology, geography, economics, philosophy, physics and psychology. Professor William H. Dutton served as Director of the OII from 2001 to 2011. Professor Helen Margetts occupied the Directorship between 2011 and 2018. The current director is Professor Philip N. Howard.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
Oxford Bibliographies in International Relations
 
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Patrick James, Editor in Chief of Oxford Bibliographies in International Relations, discusses the power of digital research. He explains how Oxford Bibliographies helps focus the research process by providing users with anchor citations and up-to-date articles. http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/ Developed cooperatively with scholars and librarians worldwide, Oxford Bibliographies offers exclusive, authoritative research guides. Combining the best features of an annotated bibliography and a high-level encyclopedia, this cutting-edge resource guides researchers to the best available scholarship across a wide variety of subjects. © Oxford University Press
Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_Institute,_University_of_Oxford 00:00:23 1 Overview 00:01:21 2 History 00:02:18 3 Statutory Professors 00:02:28 3.1 Pure mathematics 00:03:06 3.2 Applied mathematics 00:04:06 3.3 Alumni 00:04:26 4 Examination times 00:04:48 5 In popular culture Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8902631884210639 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-B "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Mathematical Institute is the mathematics department at the University of Oxford, England. It forms one of the twelve departments of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division in the University. The department is located between Somerville College and Green Templeton College on Woodstock Road, next to the Faculty of Philosophy.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_Institute,_University_of_Oxford 00:00:25 1 Overview 00:01:24 2 History 00:02:24 3 Statutory Professors 00:02:33 3.1 Pure mathematics 00:03:12 3.2 Applied mathematics 00:04:17 3.3 Alumni 00:04:38 4 Examination times 00:05:00 5 In popular culture Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7434363279413098 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The Mathematical Institute is the mathematics department at the University of Oxford, England. It forms one of the twelve departments of the Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division in the University. The department is located between Somerville College and Green Templeton College on Woodstock Road, next to the Faculty of Philosophy.
Views: 3 wikipedia tts
What Makes a Superpower: New Perspectives on China’s Rise  Todd Hall (Oxford University)
 
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Prof Hall earned his PhD from the University of Chicago in 2008 and has held postdoctoral fellowships at Princeton and Harvard, as well as visiting scholar appointments at the Free University of Berlin, Tsinghua University in Beijing, and the University of Tokyo. Prior to joining the University of Oxford, Prof Hall held the position of Assistant Professor in Political Science at the University of Toronto (2010-2013). Research interests extend to the areas of international relations theory; the intersection of emotion, affect, and foreign policy; and Chinese foreign policy. Recent publications include articles in Asian Security, International Organization, International Security, International Studies Quarterly, International Studies Review, Political Science Quarterly, and Security Studies. Prof Hall has also published a book with Cornell University Press, titled Emotional Diplomacy: Official Emotion on the International Stage, which was recently named co-recipient of the International Studies Association’s 2016 Diplomatic Studies Section Book Award. Prof Hall’s research fields include: Theorizing the role of emotions and affect in international politics. The international relations of East Asia, with a specific focus on the foreign policy of China. Our video series “What Makes a Superpower: New Perspectives on China’s Rise” was filmed on the sidelines of our 2018 lecture series held at the University of Göttingen from April to June. In our conversations with Liu Kang, Todd Hall and Saori Katade we discuss China’s rise from the angle of political thought and Chinese exceptionalism, debate emotions in international relations and examine China’s diplomacy as well as its role within the BRICS countries. In this video Tod Hall discusses three questions: 1. Many scholars have compared Anglo-German rivalry before 1914 to the PRC-US relationship today. Why are such analogies problematic? 2. Which lessons of 1914 can we learn for East Asia today? 3. How do affect and emotion shape international relations? Could you provide one or two examples from East Asia?
Quantum Effects in Gravity | Full Talk | Chiara Marletto
 
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Despite decades of speculations, no viable proposal to detect quantum effects in gravity has yet been proposed. But the new Constructor theory has emerged to propose a new class of experiments. Oxford's physicist Chiara Marletto makes the case. ** Subscribe to the Institute of Art and Ideas https://www.youtube.com/user/IAITV ** Listen to our weekly podcast: https://soundcloud.com/instituteofartandideas ** Donate to the Institute of Art and Ideas: https://iai.tv/support-the-iai/donate Chiara Marletto: Chiara Marletto is a Junior Research Fellow at the Oxford University Materials Department, where she works with pioneering physicist David Deutsch on the Construtor Theory of Information- the theory that all fundamental laws of nature are expressible as statements of possibility, and explaining how quantum information and classical information are related. For debates and talks: https://iai.tv For articles: https://iai.tv/articles For courses: https://iai.tv/iai-academy/courses
Oxford Handbooks Online: Answers for every question along the research journey
 
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Find out how Oxford Handbooks Online can help your users find the latest conversations surrounding their topic. http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/ Oxford Handbooks Online contains in-depth, high-level articles by scholars at the top of their field. The Handbooks series covers 14 subject areas and continues to grow. The articles review key issues and major debates, and provide an argument for how those debates might evolve. © Oxford University Press
Oxford Research Encyclopedias: African History
 
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Led by Thomas Spear, the ORE of African History will provide overviews of established ideas in the field and articles will appear online first in a discoverable environment. Follow the progress of the ORE of African History at http://africanhistory.oxfordre.com/ Through the Oxford Research Encyclopedia (ORE) program, Oxford is building online encyclopedias in over 20 disciplines, powered by the world's leading scholars and researchers. With expert editors and peer-review, the ORE project will combine the discoverability of digital with the standards of academic publishing. © Oxford University Press
Chemistry Research Laboratory, University of Oxford | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemistry_Research_Laboratory,_University_of_Oxford 00:01:29 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.815928526989694 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Chemistry Research Laboratory is a research facility home to Chemistry at the University of Oxford in England. It is part of the Department of Chemistry in the University.Her Majesty The Queen opened the building on 20 February 2004, which replaced the older Dyson Perrins Laboratory not far away in the University's Science Area. It has five floors covering approximately 17,000 sq.m of laboratory and office space and cost £60 million to construct. The money was raised with grants from the JIF, Wolfson Foundation, EP Abraham Trust, Thomas Swan, the family of Landon T. Clay, the Salters' Company and a £20 million partnership with IP2IPO.The building is effectively split into two parts, the southern side of the building is given over to offices which house both academic and administrative staff, whereas the northern side of the building houses the laboratories and write up areas. Splitting the two sides, there is a canteen on the lower ground floor, which can be crossed via the use of bridges on higher floors. The Laboratory is located on the corner of South Parks Road and Mansfield Road, to the south of the main Science Area.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts