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EU Law - The Single Market
 
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The single market is a at the heart of the Brexit debate as access to the market also depends on the free movement of labour. The single market is often taken for granted but required a lot of hard work starting mainly with the Single European Act 1986 that now forms a part of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. Article 26(1) removes the deadline for the single market as this is an ongoing task while 26(2) defines the single market as "an area without internal frontiers in which the free movement of goods, persons, services and capital is ensured". To achieve these aims 26(3) describes the Council taking action based on the recommendations and advice of the Commission. Article 27 states that when doing this the Commission will take into account the effort required on the part of national economies and can allow for derogations in certain circumstances. The main power for making legislation comes from Article 114 as Article 115 requires unanimity and only allows for the passing of directives. On the other hand Article 114 makes use of the ordinary legislative procedure and allows for regulations as well as directives. This power is not unlimited as seen in Tobacco Advertising [2000] where the ECJ held that the objective has to be the harmonisation of the internal market but even in Tobacco Advertising [2006] a small change to the original directive showed the broad approach the ECJ would be prepared to take. There are also, however, qualifications within article 114. Article 114(2) state that the procedure cannot apply to fiscal provisions, free movement of people and employment rights. (3) meanwhile states that for health, safety, environmental and consumer protection the base line is a high level of protection based on the latest scientific research. However the most controversial qualification comes from Arts. 114(4)-(9) which potentially allows member states themselves to go against a harmonising measure. This is rarely used though and can only be applied in restricted circumstances. For (4) the concern must relate to environment, working environment or exceptions from art. 36 and only provides for the retention of existing legislation in that state. (5) does allow for new legislation to be passed but must be specific to that MS and based on new scientific evidence. Thus we can see this is not only restrictive within the Article but the checks from the Commission and the judgments of the ECJ will always be towards enforcing the treaty while the burden of proof itself is on the state. Finally Art. 114(10) allows member states to take temporary measures where there is a concern relating to Art.36. In practical terms the EU uses this legislation to develop the single market through various approaches such as mutual recognition and setting standards in certain industries. The single market is an on going process and while it is scrutinised from a political and social standpoint it continues to harmonise things across all member states.
Views: 5083 marcuscleaver
What is the Single Market? Professor Michael Dougan explains the key facts
 
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BOOK RELEASE - "THE UK AFTER BREXIT": This collection of essays, edited by Professor Michael Dougan, details the law and policy challenges following from the UK's withdrawal from the European Union Details: http://intersentia.com/en/the-uk-after-brexit.html Professor Michael Dougan from the EU Law @ Liverpool team explains what the single market is, and why leaving it would leaving will present enormous challenges to the UK economy. See: https://www.facebook.com/EULawAtLiverpool/ https://twitter.com/livuni_EULaw
Views: 35271 EU Law At Liverpool
Capacity mechanisms and the internal energy market: Legal issues | Malgorzata Sadowska
 
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Author: Malgorzata Sadowska | FSR Category: FSR webinar recording Level: intermediate Date of release: December 2014 Recorded on 17th December 2014 How does EU law treat capacity mechanisms? A number of European countries are concerned about the security of their electricity supply and set up capacity mechanisms to encourage investment in new generation or support existing and less profitable conventional power plants. The European Commission closely examines these state-driven measures under EU law, as their uncoordinated implementation across Europe might have negative effects on the increasingly interconnected energy markets and thwart EU energy policy objectives. What restrictions can the EU law impose on capacity mechanisms to minimise the distortions of the internal energy market? Can state aid, competition policy and internal market rules work? http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Webinar/2014/141217SadowskaWebinar.aspx This is a recording of webinar held on 17th December 2014, moderated by Riccardo Galletta | Florence School of Regulation -- Music "I Could Use Time to Just Chill With You" by Ben Seretan is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
What is... The Free Movement of Goods
 
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Free Movement of Goods you say? In this first EU encyclopedia piece I explain the basic principles and advantages of the free movement of goods, one of the four constituent areas of the European Single Market. SOURCES: General Information: Barnard and Piers EU Law, Chapter 12 Ian Dunt: Brexit What the Hell Happens Next? pp 40-45 Cassis de Dijon: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/HTML/?uri=CELEX:61978CJ0120&from=en Article 30 TFEU http://www.lisbon-treaty.org/wcm/the-lisbon-treaty/treaty-on-the-functioning-of-the-european-union-and-comments/part-3-union-policies-and-internal-actions/title-ii-free-movement-of-goods/chapter-1-the-customs-union/172-article-30.html Article 110 TFEU: http://www.lisbon-treaty.org/wcm/the-lisbon-treaty/treaty-on-the-functioning-of-the-european-union-and-comments/part-3-union-policies-and-internal-actions/title-vii-common-rules-on-competition-taxation-and-approximation-of-laws/chapter-2-tax-provisions/378-article-110.html Article 144 TFEU http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/HTML/?uri=CELEX:12008E114&from=EN Article 36 TFEU- Read in conjunction with Articles 34 and 35 http://www.lisbon-treaty.org/wcm/the-lisbon-treaty/treaty-on-the-functioning-of-the-european-union-and-comments/part-3-union-policies-and-internal-actions/title-ii-free-movement-of-goods/chapter-3-prohibition-of-quantitative-restrictions-between-member-states/178-article-36.html Also very interesting watch and covers the topics in detail: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxEvHRRaGY8&t=2336s
Views: 2920 Niklas Sloan
EU Digital Single Market Strategy Executive Briefing
 
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EU Digital Single Market Strategy: An executive briefing on DSM strategy, objectives and implementation Opening Remarks by: H.E. David O'Sullivan, EU Ambassador to the U.S. Briefing with: Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor for the Digital Economy/Cyber In May 2015 the European Commission announced the Digital Single Market (DSM) strategy: an ambitious initiative to remove regulatory walls and take the EU’s single market of 508 million people from the physical to the digital space. Since then the Commission has published 16 targeted regulatory and non-regulatory actions, addressing everything from privacy to cyber-security, and telecommunications to digital manufacturing. But what are the next steps for these proposals? And how do the DSM actions intersect with these policy discussions in the U.S.? The EU Delegation to the US invites you to an executive briefing to discuss the Digital Single Market strategy in light of the upcoming DSM midterm review in May 2017. Andrea Glorioso, Counsellor for the Digital Economy/Cyber, will shed some light on the objectives and implementation of the DSM, and the importance of transatlantic coordination to avoid regulatory/policy fragmentation within the world's largest trading bloc.
Views: 1164 EUintheUS
OHIM - Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market - Intellectual Property Basics
 
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Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=rolfclaessen As of 23 March 2016, the office will no longer be called OHIM but rather European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO). Also, the Community Trademarks will then become European Union trade marks. The Regulation (EU) No 2015/2424 will also lead to other changes that I will cover in a future video. The office is based in beautiful Alicante in Spain and is headed by António Campinos. It was formed in 1994 to allow for the administration of EU wide trademarks and designs. Since then, Community Trademarks, or short CTMs, have become very popular and national trademark filings in some EU countries have decreased over the last decades. Besides the registration of trademarks and designs, the Office is providing some very useful additional services: TMView is a database, where you can search for identical and similar trademarks in many countries, including all EU countries, Japan, the US, China, and Switzerland. TMview is basically a global trade mark search tool that provides first hand data about trade marks from the participating intellectual property offices. Access to over 20 million trade marks online. Available for free at www.tmdn.org https://www.tmdn.org/tmview/welcome.html?lang=de https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScsHsTGjVjg I also offer a tutorial on how to use this database at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dmn_vGs2he0 DesignView is a database, where you can search for designs in many countries, including all EU countries, Korea, the US, and China. https://www.tmdn.org/tmdsview-web/welcome# TMClass is a database, where you can search for accepted terms of goods and services in many countries as well as the harmonized database of EU countries. The database also hosts a subset of terms TM5 that are accepted by the 5 major trademark offices in the World. http://oami.europa.eu/ec2/?lang=en http://oami.europa.eu/ec2/tm5 The OHIM is also hosting the EU Observatory, which is dedicated to the enforcement of intellectual property rights, the fight against counterfeit goods as well as the education of the public. Another really helpful event that is hosted by the OHIM is European judges' symposium every two years. Judges from Member States and candidate countries attend these Symposia along with representatives from the Court of Justice and the Court of First Instance. Working sessions focus on absolute and relative grounds for refusing registration of a Community trade mark, proceedings brought before the Community trade mark courts and the impact of EU enlargement on the Community trade mark system. Also, check out their YouTube channel OAMITubes. https://www.youtube.com/user/OAMItubes Links to all resources are provided in the shownotes below this video. About Rolf Claessen Rolf is partner of IP boutique law firm Freischem. The firm is managing about 4500 trademarks and 6500 patents and patent applications for mostly domestic medium sized clients in Germany in many technical fields. The focus of his practice is the prosecution of trademarks and patents and other intellectual property rights. His expertise in patent prosecution encompasses a deep understanding of patent law, prior art searches, prosecuting patent applications, patent drafting, opposition and defending against competitors. With the team at Freischem, he strives to be the external IP department for many medium sized companies. Rolf has been included in the Patent 1000 rankings of the IAM magazine ever since 2013. And he is included in the WTR1000 ranking in 2015. He is a prolific writer mostly writing for law journals such as GRUR or IP Rechtsberater. He is host of his two podcasts Markenpod and IP Fridays. Rolf is also volunteering his time in the worldwide volunteer organization Junior Chamber International (JCI), where he served as executive congress director for the JCI World Congress 2014 in Germany. He enjoys spending at least the weekends with his three kids and his wife. Rolf wishes to have more time for hobbies like sailing. Contact Rolf at Dr. Rolf Claessen Patent Attorneys Freischem Salierring 47 - 53 (12th floor) D-50677 Cologne Germany Telephone: +49 (221) 270 5770 Facsimile: +49 (221) 27057710 http://www.freischem.eu Legalese and Disclaimer You have been watching a video by Rolf Claessen. The views expressed by the participants of this program are their own and do not represent the views of nor are they endorsed by their respective law firms. None of the content should be considered legal advice. This video should not be construed as legal advice or legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances. The contents of this video are intended for general informational purposes only and you are urged to consult your own patent attorney on any specific legal questions. As always, consult a patent attorney.
Views: 1114 FREISCHEM & PARTNER
Retail Markets in the EU with Jan Panek
 
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Shaping the power grid business -- a joint initiative of Vlerick Business School and Florence School of Regulation. Interview with Jan Panek (Head of Unit Internal Market III: Retail markets; coal & oil, DG ENER, European Commission) for the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME -- Module 1. Interviewer: Annika Zorn (Coordinator Florence School of Regulation). Jan Panek gives an overview on where we stand with the functioning of the retail market in Europe today. He also defines a smart retail market and answers as to whether the abolition of regulated prices is a tool to make active demand response work or what other tools would be needed. He concludes by drawing a picture of what the challenges for the traditional players will be in the retail market. Find more information on this executive training programme for power grid managers here: http://www.vlerick.com/powergrid more information on Florence School of Regulation www.florence-school.eu find more online teaching material of the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME here http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLObuk3UYC3P19dhToHCheYJO_mfhOaXKQ
Alberto Pototschnig | Market Coupling for the Internal Gas Market?
 
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http://florence-school.eu/event/market-coupling-for-the-internal-gas-market Alberto Pototschnig, Director of ACER, introduces the FSR Policy Workshop: Market Coupling for the Internal Gas Market? Market Coupling for the Internal Gas Market? FSR Regulatory Policy Workshop Series 2015-2016 A review and update of the Gas Target Model was presented by the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) earlier this year. This model, in line with the main targets of a successful Internal Gas Market (IGM), would not only promote competition and fluidity but also suggest a “cooperative approach” among Member States in Europe to cope with possible supply disruptions.
The Internal Market - Towards a Social Market Place?
 
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The recent developments regarding internal market regulation have taken place on two frontiers. The fight against unemployment and the efforts to boost economic growth builds upon the Single Market Acts. While the traditional principles of free trade still weigh heavily, can the same be said of the emergence of the tight network of financial service regulations? Since "L'Europe sociale" is firmly on the agenda, is the crisis restructuring the internal market, moving it away from liberalization? Are the internal market solutions in sync with those of the Eurozone? For this lecture we have assembled the following panel: Prof. Em. Jonathan Faull, Director General, DG Internal Market and services Prof. Dr. Harri Kalimo, Senior Research Fellow, Institute for European Studies (Chair) This is the third session of a series of lectures on "EU Economic law in a Time of Crisis" organised by the Institute for European Studies at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Views: 451 IES Brussels
How can banks mitigate regulatory compliance risks?
 
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How do you get a handle of the risks and contingent liabilities within your financial agreements? Thomson Reuters Financial Trade Documentation Services helps banks overcome the external pressure from regulators looking to make the markets more transparent, efficient and safer, and the internal pressures to be more cost-effective and leaner. Through a collaborative, consultative relationship and acting as an extension of the team, Thomson Reuters will help streamline processes, control costs and reduce regulatory compliance risks in your financial institution. Learn more at http://legalsolutions.com/financial-trade
Views: 9316 Thomson Reuters Legal
A Digital Single Market for Europe
 
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The Internet and digital technologies are transforming our world – in every walk of life and in every line of business. Europe must embrace the digital revolution and open up digital opportunities for people and businesses. How? By using the power of the EU's Single Market. https://ec.europa.eu/priorities/digital-single-market_en
Views: 5452 European Commission
Achieving the Internal Market | Speech by David Newbery
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Achieving the Internal Market Speaker: David NEWBERY (Emeritus Professor of Economics, University of Cambridge) The European Union is said to achieve its Internal Energy Market by 2014. It has been underway since 1990. Why did it take so long? What does "achieving" mean? Who will achieve what? And al-so, what can EU citizens expect from such "achievement"? Lower prices? More stable prices? A better supply? A fairer equalisation of energy conditions all across Europe? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
EU Law - Freedom of Establishment and Services
 
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The distinction between establishment and services is based on the idea that establishment is more permanent whereas services are more temporary in nature. Establishment mainly falls under Art. 49 with 49(1) allowing for primary and secondary establishment and (2) prohibiting unequal or discriminatory treatment. The law in this area is directly effective as per Reyners [1974]. Equivalent qualifications across member states are interpreted broadly as per Heylens [1987] and also Directive 2005/36 Meanwhile article 49(2) has been broadened beyond discrimination to include any unjustified restriction on the freedom of establishment. The main case in this are is Gebhard [1995] that allows for restrictions only if they meet four criteria: 1) Non-discriminatory 2) Justified 3) Needed to secure an objective 4) Don't go beyond what is necessary to achieve that objective A national can rely on Art. 49 with respect to their own member state only when they have exercised the freedom of movement themselves as per Knoors [1979] Article 54 states companies should be treated in the same way as individuals and although company law can vary from state to state the ECJ has placed a lot of focus on achieving the overall objective of freedom of establishment as seen in Centros [1999] and Überseering [2002]. However once a company is established in a Member State they are then subject to that country's rules as regards incorporation etc. as per Daily Mail [1988] and Cartesio [2008] The liberalisation provided by Art. 54 means that it can be difficult to crack down on tax avoidance as seen in Cadbury Schweppes [2006]. Freedom of services is based on the temporary nature of the work rather than the infrastructure or, as per Commission v Portugal [2010], the period of time. Art. 57 loosely defines services and 58 excludes other services that are covered in other parts of the treaty. Art. 56 also has direct effect as per Van Binsbergen [1974]. Similarly there also has to be an inter-state element as seen in Deliège [2000] Also covered is the freedom to receive services; Luisi & Carbone [1984] The service does have to be provided for remuneration and this line can become blurred in relation to certain healthcare systems that are a hybrid between user and government payments Some controversial services such as abortion, gambling and marijuana can still be considered services (Grogan [1991]) but can be subject to national rules that provide a proportional and non-discriminatory restriction (Zenatti [1999]). Taking a broad definition it is even possible that certain social benefits may also fall within the definition; Cowan [1989]. Art. 62 allows for restrictions on policy, security and health grounds. Beyond this Van Binsbergen [1974] sets out the conditions for any restriction imposed by a Member State: 1) Pursuit of a legitimate public interest 2) Applied without discrimination 3) Proportionate 4) Respects fundamental rights (Carpenter [2002]) This freedom can be controversial as it allows greater liberalisation in the labour market at the expense of employee rights. This came to a head in Laval [2007] although this judgment has been tempered somewhat by the Rome I Regulation. Restrictions on tax grounds can be allowed to prevent fraud but not for other, broader reasons; Danner [2002]. Non-discriminatory restrictions can also be caught if they are a hinderance to the freedom of services (Alpine Investments [1995]) and Gebhard [1995] also applies within this context. The Bolkenstein Directive sought to achieve greater harmonisation by focusing on the country of origin but after protest this was watered down and so only mainly deals with a range of procedural and administrative issues.
Views: 15051 marcuscleaver
What is important when making general rules for the internal market in the draft regulation?
 
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Interview with Jacob Bagge Hansen conducted during the Workshop on Biostimulants, hosted by the EU DK Permanent Representartion
Views: 40 Prospero AG
#EUArchives – History of the European Internal Market
 
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On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Treaties of Rome, this archive video stockshot gives an overview of the development of the internal market.
Views: 2109 European Commission
The EU ‘digital single market’ explained | FT Business
 
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► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs The European Commission has unveiled plans for a “digital single market”, in an effort to shake up Europe’s digital businesses. FT Brussels correspondent Duncan Robinson explains the five things you need to know about the move. ► FT Business: http://bit.ly/1KUK08s ► FT Global Economy: http://bit.ly/1J5mmqH ► EU Escalates Migrant Response: http://bit.ly/1RBY20T Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes
Views: 5982 Financial Times
Anneleen van Bossuyt MEP: better regulation in the internal market/betere regulering interne markt
 
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ECR MEP from Flanders Anneleen Van Bossuyt is writing a report for the European Parliament's internal market committee on better regulation. Here she sets out what she believes is needed for the EU to focus more on producing and implementing better legislation. As a new member of the European Parliament for ECR I am glad to have been entrusted with the report on better regulation in the internal market. Today the European Union experiences a lot of problems on this front. Europe deals with overregulation. It is believed that Europe is only doing well if it is making legislation. However, much legislation is not necessary better legislation. On the contrary, less legislation can also result in good or even better legislation. The current European overregulation leads among others to great administrative burdens for our SME's. SME's which are primordial in creating the jobs and economic growth we need so hard today. Now, how should we tackle this overregulation? Firstly, the EU needs to focus on those matters which cannot be dealt with at national or local level. The EU needs to focus on those areas where she adds a value. For example with regard to the climate change: this problem cannot be dealt with by separate national governments but can only be dealt with by Europe. Secondly, new legislation should be balanced and easily enforceable. Only in this way, legislation can reach its targets. More concretely, the European institutions should raise their sense of accountability. They need to realise that it is not just about making new legislation, but about making better legislation. Moreover, legislation needs to be evaluated more often. On the one hand it needs to be evaluated before and during the legislative process (what is the outcome of certain legislation, what does it cost once put to practice, etc.?) and on the other hand after the legislation has been put to practice (what were the consequences of the legislation? Does the legislation need to be adjusted? etc.) The European Parliament itself has a major role to play in this debate. For instance, all too often amendments are being implemented during triologues without thinking about the consequences or the cost of their implementation. This needs to change. It is our task as members of the European Parliament to establish better legislation and regulation. It is the only way to convince our citizens that Europe is necessary and can be of great value. Video: betere regulering interne markt Als nieuw Europees Parlementslid voor de ECR ben ik enorm verheugd dat het rapport voor betere regelgeving in de interne markt aan mij werd toegewezen. Vandaag de dag kampt de Europese Unie met een groot probleem op dit vlak. Europa kampt met een vorm van regeldrift, een Europese regelmentitis. Er bestaat vandaag een cultuur van "we zijn enkel goed bezig als we wetgeving aan het maken zijn". Echter, ook minder wetgeving kan voor goede wetgeving zorgen. Ten tweede zorgt de Europese regelgeving vandaag de dag al te vaak voor administratieve lasten voor onze KMO's, KMO's die vandaag belangrijk zijn voor het creëren van de broodnodige groei en jobs. Wat moet er dan gebeuren? Eerst en vooral moet Europa zich bezig houden met die zaken die we niet kunnen aanpakken op nationaal of lokaal niveau. Europa moet zich bezig houden met die zaken waar ze een meerwaarde kan bieden. Denken we bvb. aan de klimaatsproblematiek: dit kan elk land niet apart op nationaal niveau oplossen, hiervoor hebben we Europa nodig. Ten tweede is het belangrijk dat wanneer men wetgeving maakt, dat die eenvoudig, gemakkelijk en gemakkelijk toepasbaar is. Enkel op die manier kan wetgeving haar doelstellingen bereiken. Hoe kunnen we dit concreet aanpakken? Het is belangrijk dat er meer verantwoordelijkheidszin aan de dag wordt gelegd bij de Europese instellingen. Men moet zich bewust worden van de noodzaak aan betere regelgeving. Daarnaast is er meer evaluatie van wetgeving nodig. Dit zowel vooraf en tijdens het wetgevend proces (wat zijn de gevolgen van bepaalde wetgeving, wat is de kostprijs, enz.), als achteraf (welke effecten had de wetgeving, waar dient de wetgeving bijgestuurd te worden, enz.). Het Europees Parlement kan en moet hierbij een belangrijke rol spelen. Zo worden er vandaag tijdens triloogonderhandelingen al te vaak amendementen ingediend, zonder dat er wordt nagedacht over de gevolgen of kosten hiervan. Dit mag niet meer gebeuren. Het is onze taak om deze zaken aan te pakken. Enkel zo kunnen we de burger overtuigen dat Europa echt nodig is en een meerwaarde kan bieden!
Views: 375 ECRgroupEU
Private Law and the Internal Market
 
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BOOK REVIEW PRIVATE LAW AND THE INTERNAL MARKET Direct Horizontal Effect of the Treaty Provisions on Free Movement By Roel van Leuken Translated from the Dutch by Lou Punt-Heyning ISBN: 978 1 78068 466 6 INTERSENTIA www.intersentia.com _________________________________________________ THE LAW OF THE EUROPEAN UNION AT A CROSSROADS WITH THE INTERNAL MARKET An appreciation by Elizabeth Robson Taylor of Richmond Green Chambers and Phillip Taylor MBE, Head of Chambers and Reviews Editor, “The Barrister” Make no mistake, we need a book like this at this time from the excellent specialist publishers on European matters, Intersentia. Not just because of the decision to Brexit, foolhardy though it may seem to many people here in UK and on the continent. But also because of the role of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). Roel van Leuken writes that the book was triggered because the CJEU “has interpreted a number of free movement provisions of primary EU law as having direct influence on private law relationships”. Of particular concern at the present time is how the internal market will function in the next decade as Britain leaves. Much, of course, remains unclear because we are all entering new territory. Van Leuken’s mission is to “seek out the links between the Court’s ruling on the issues”. He also examines the rulings “by analysing them against the background of the various mechanisms used by EU law to influence national private law. Van Leuken also looks at whether the approach taken by the CJEU to one free movement provision “can be predictive for other free movement provisions” and, if that is the case to estimate its extent. As the author says, “private law and private law relationships in Member States of the European Union are increasingly influenced by EU law”. And van Leuken writes “sometimes, this influence is predictable”. And he gives an example where EU law provides expressly that violation of a rule shall produce a specific private law effect covered by Article 101(2) TFEU. He goes on to remark that “less predictable are the consequences where the CJEU interprets provisions of EU law ostensibly addressed to the Member States such as creating, modifying or extinguishing rights and obligations in legal relationships between individuals”. Since 1974, the ECJ, now CJEU has given interpretations to such direct horizontal effect to some of the TFEU provisions on free movement which we found very helpful. “Private Law and the Internal Market” sets out to establish the links between the relevant judgments in useful detail. He also discusses the impact which accepting direct horizontal effect has on the grounds that must be available to individuals as a defence to alleged infringement of a free movement provision. This most thoughtful work is another title from Intersentia who are based in Cambridge, Antwerp and Portland. Intersentia provides us, as EU lawyers with some of the most useful contemporary practitioner and academic commentaries which make our professional lives so much easier. Thank you. The book was published on 1st May 2017 and has been translated from the original Dutch by Lou Punt-Heyning.
Views: 46 Phillip Taylor
Innovation, Regulation, and the EU's Digital Single Market Strategy
 
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The European Commission's Digital Single Market Strategy is intended to break down the numerous barriers to cross-border online activity that currently exist in the European Union. The proposal covers a broad array of policies, including harmonizing EU rules for online purchases of goods, improving cross-border parcel delivery, integrating telecommunications regulation, and reducing burdens of different VAT regimes. While many of these proposals do not seem controversial—at least on this side of the Atlantic—some require closer scrutiny. For example, the strategy document includes a section on online platforms, reflecting the support of some officials for a general regulatory framework for "essential digital platforms." In addition, the Commission is launching an inquiry in tandem with the Digital Single Market Strategy on the application of competition law in the e-commerce area. Listen in as panelists evaluate the Digital Single Market strategy's effect on economies and, most importantly, incentives to innovate, on both sides of the Atlantic.
Views: 27 techpolicy
FSR Energy Regulation Interview | Klaus Dieter Borchardt, European Commission
 
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http://fsr.eui.eu Klaus Dieter Borchardt is Director of the Internal Energy Market at DG Energy. Recorded at the 27th meeting of the European Electricity Regulatory Forum, Florence, 27th November 2014. http://ec.europa.eu/energy/en/events/27th-meeting-european-electricity-regulatory-forum-florence Part of a series of seven interviews to support the FSR-CEER Training on the Fundamentals of Energy Regulation http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Workshop/2015/150420CEERTraining.aspx
Scrapping the costly/pointless Single Market Regulations
 
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#ProjectFear hookwinked the Left, in the campaign, by equating EU Regulations with Employment Rights. In reality the majority of EU regulations are to do with anything & everything else. John Longworth proposes a sunset clause on all EU regulations, that they will all expire 5 years from Brexit day, unless they are actively engaged back onto books. This stops passive re-adoption. History suggests, Whitehall WILL RESIST all deregulation attempts. Open Europe estimates that the 100 most expensive EU regulations set back the UK economy by £27.4 billion a year. Such a de-regulation of business, would be an effective tax cut of 1.2% of GDP. John Longworth at Select Committee Rooms, 7th December 2016.
Views: 671 Channel Brexit
The Completion of the Internal Energy Market | Workshop Highlights by FSR Energy
 
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Florence School of Regulation: FSR.EUI.eu Event Programme: http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Workshop/2015/150130CompletionInternalEnergyMarket.aspx Introduction Alberto Pototschnig | FSR/EUI Session 1: Completing the Internal Energy Markets: Consumer Expectation 3:18 Peter Claes | IFIEC, The expectation of energy intensive consumers Monika Štajnarová | BEUC, Is the internal energy market delivering for smaller consumers? Session 2: Progress Towards the Creation of an Internal Electricity Market 6:00 Christophe Gence-Creux | ACER, Where do we stand? Roundtable: Priorities for completing the internal electricity market Gunnar Lorenz| Eurelectric Robert Staschus| ENTSO-E Hans Randen | NordPool Spot/Europex Session 3: Progress Towards the Creation of an Internal Gas Market 11:00 Dennis Hesseling | ACER, Where do we stand? Roundtable: Priorities for completing the internal gas market Tom Maes | AGWG, (Via conference call, not in video) Vittorio Musazzi | ENTSOG Overview: In the conclusion of its meeting on 4 February 2011, the Council of the European Union set 2014 as the target date for the completion of the Internal Electricity and Gas Markets. This goal was reaffirmed in the conclusions of the meeting on 22 May 2013. Significant progress has been achieved towards meeting this objective, both in terms of the development of the required market and network operation rules and on the ground. In fact, in terms of rulemaking, two network codes have already been adopted, a third one should be adopted soon and ten more have already been recommended for adoption to the European Commission and they could soon enter into the Comitology process. Moreover, a number of the main provisions in these network codes have already been implemented in practice, through the voluntary cooperation of national regulatory authorities (NRAs), transmission system operators (TSOs) and other stakeholders. This early implementation approach has been supported by the Agency for Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER), which has coordinated the definition of a number of Roadmaps for the rapid and effective integration of the electricity and gas markets, to deliver tangible benefits to EU energy consumers as soon as possible. In the electricity day-ahead timeframe, a single market-coupling platform operates, since May 2014, to determine prices and cross-border flows on a large part of the EU, from the Straits of Gibraltar to the Barents Sea. Similarly, a single platform is already used for allocating capacity on the majority of internal EU gas interconnection points. However much still remains to be done. The first coordinated auction for long-term electricity cross-border transmission rights is expected to take place in the second half of 2015, on the basis of harmonised auction rules currently being developed. In the intra-day timeframe of the internal electricity market, the development of a single continuous-trading, market-coupling platform has been repeatedly delayed and the go-live is now expected by the end of 2015 at the earliest, more than two years later than originally planned. Liquidity of many gas hubs still needs to be enhanced so that they could provide robust price signals to determine the efficient flow of gas across the EU. A well-functioning internal energy market is also increasingly recognised as an important contributor to the security of energy supply of the EU, as well as a pre-requisite for any additional measure to promote such security. This Workshop aims at reviewing progress in the creation of a single market in electricity and gas across the EU and at identifying what is still missing so that EU consumers can reap the full benefits. The Workshop will be structured in three sessions. Session I will be devoted to assess energy consumers’ expectations from the internal energy market and the benefits already accrued to them. Sessions II and III will aim at reviewing progress towards the creation of a single market in electricity and natural gas, respectively.
EU plans deeper single market
 
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EurActiv article: http://www.euractiv.com/specialreport-jobs-growth/barnier-launches-growth-drivers-news-515169 The Single Market is considered by many as the biggest European achievement since the Union was created. It was born 20 years ago to ensure EU citizens can live, work, study or shop in any country. With more than 500 million consumers, EU businesses are also free to sell their goods and services anywwhere across the continent. Today, the European Commission believes that the single market holds the key to get Europe out of the crisis. European Commission's vice-president Michel Barnier on Wednesday put forward new proposals to further develop the single market. The plan aims at increasing growth, employment and confidence in the EU. 'I am very happy to confirm that this morning, the college adopted the Single market act II. This is a collective piece of work and it is a very important piece of work. It is the follow up to the first stage of the single market act which we presented a year ago in a context of very lucid diagnosis of the internal market which Mario Monti had carried out', said Commissioner for Internal Market Michel Barnier. Improving cross-border mobility of citizens and business across Europe or the digital economy are some of the new proposals. Barnier expects five of the 12 proposals to be adopted by the end of the year "if there is political will". 'Now, we think that 5 of these 12 proposals, if the political willing is there in the Council and the Parliament, these five could be adopted by the end of this year; the one on patent, strengthen cooperation, the risk capital passport, the investment fund for social entrepreneurship and the proposal on alternative conflict settlement and the directive on the counting standards', said Commissioner for Internal Market Michel Barnier. The first Single Market Act was adopted in April 2011 as a response to the economic crisis. Some of its proposals are still being discussed by Parliament and ministers. -0-
Views: 865 EURACTIV
Achieving the Internal Market | Speech by Philip Lowe
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Achieving the Internal Market Speaker: Philip LOWE (Director-General, European Commission -- DG Energy) The European Union is said to achieve its Internal Energy Market by 2014. It has been underway since 1990. Why did it take so long? What does "achieving" mean? Who will achieve what? And al-so, what can EU citizens expect from such "achievement"? Lower prices? More stable prices? A better supply? A fairer equalisation of energy conditions all across Europe? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28
 
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How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 548195 CrashCourse
#Digital Single Market: mid-term review
 
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The internet and digital technologies are transforming our world; but existing barriers online mean citizens miss out on goods and services, internet companies and startups have their horizons limited, and businesses and governments cannot fully benefit from digital tools. Therefore, the European Commission launched the Digital Single Market in May 2015. Since then, the Commission has delivered on 16 key measures, presenting 35 proposals and policy initiatives in total. Having reached the middle of its mandate, it is now time to review the progress of the Digital Single Market strategy. This video shows the key areas where progress has been made and co-legislators’ actions are needed. The review also identifies 3 areas where further EU action is needed: (1) to develop the European Data Economy to its full potential, (2) to protect Europe's assets by tackling cybersecurity challenges, and (3) to promote the online platforms as responsible players of a fair internet ecosystem
Views: 312 EUReporterFeatured
Reportage: Single Market Act
 
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The European Commission has adopted the 'Single Market Act', a plan to boost growth and restore confidence in the benefits of market integration in Europe. The Single Market Act sets out 50 proposals to be enforced by 2012 to make the single market work better and calls for action to make the lives of all market participants -- companies, consumers and workers -- easier.
Third Package of Internal Energy Market Legislation - Part 1  by Leigh Hancher
 
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Shaping the power grid business -- a joint initiative of Florence School of Regulation and Vlerick Business School Part 1 - Third Package of Internal Energy Market Legislation Video lecture by Leigh Hancher (Professor of European Law at Tilburg University and Director of the Law& Policy Area of Florence School of Regulation) for the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME. In this video lecture series Leigh Hancher gives an overview on the main elements of the Third Package of Internal Energy Market for the Liberalization of Gas& Electricity Markets in the European union. In the first part of her lecture series Leigh Hancher focuses on the difference between regulations and directives with the third package. Find more online teaching material of the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME here http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLObuk3UYC3P19dhToHCheYJO_mfhOaXKQ Find more information on this executive training programme for power grid managers here: http://www.vlerick.com/powergrid Find more information on Florence School of Regulation www.florence-school.eu
Andrew Claxton | Market Coupling for the Internal Gas Market?
 
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http://florence-school.eu/event/market-coupling-for-the-internal-gas-market Andrew Claxton, Chair of WOrking Group Power Markets, Europex Market Coupling for the Internal Gas Market? FSR Regulatory Policy Workshop Series 2015-2016 A review and update of the Gas Target Model was presented by the Agency for the Cooperation of Energy Regulators (ACER) earlier this year. This model, in line with the main targets of a successful Internal Gas Market (IGM), would not only promote competition and fluidity but also suggest a “cooperative approach” among Member States in Europe to cope with possible supply disruptions.
NATO airbrushed from Committee debate on Internal Market Information System - Stuart Agnew MEP
 
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• European Parliament, Brussels, 21 November 2017 • Stuart Agnew MEP, UKIP (Eastern Counties), Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy Group (EFDD) - http://www.stuartagnewmep.co.uk • Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) • Item on Agenda: 11.0 (IMCO/8/08987) Enforcement of the Directive 2006/123/EC on services in the internal market, laying down a notification procedure for authorisation schemes and requirements related to services, and amending Directive 2006/123/EC and Regulation (EU) No 1024/2012 on administrative cooperation through the Internal Market Information System http://www.emeeting.europarl.europa.eu/committees/agenda/201711/IMCO/CJ24(2017)1121_1P/sitt-7482656 • Full session (video stream) http://www.europarl.europa.eu/ep-live/en/committees/video?event=20171121-1000-COMMITTEE-IMCO .................... • Video: EbS (European Parliament) .................................. • EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Views: 551 UKIP MEPs
Tariff Structures for the Internal Gas Market | FSR Regulatory Policy Workshop Series 2015-2016
 
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http://florence-school.eu/event/tariff-structures-for-the-internal-gas-market/ 00:00 Alberto Pototschnig | Florence School of Regulation and ACER 01:18 Clara Poletti | AEEGSI 01:59 Csilla Bartok | ACER 03:31 Doug Wood | EFET 04:05 Markus Krug | E-Control 04:56 François Léveillé | CRE Appropriate gas transmission tariff structures are indispensable to stimulate competition in the Internal Gas Market (IGM). According to the EU Regulation No 715/2009, in order to encourage gas trade’s fluidity, network users should be given the freedom to book entry and exit capacity autonomously, instead of following contractual paths.
New EU rules allow Europeans to shop online without borders - Digital Single Market
 
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On 3rd of December 2018 the new regulation proposed by the European Commission in May 2016 to end unjustified geoblocking online will enter into force. Europeans will not have to worry about a website blocking or re-routing them just because they, or their credit card, come from a different country. Wherever they are in the EU, they will be able to access goods and services online. On this occasion, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market Andrus Ansip, Commissioner in charge of Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship gave a press conference in Brussels.
Views: 137 ProductiehuisEU
Geo-blocking in the digital single market
 
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At this event we discussed the economic impact of geo-blocking, having as a starting point the Commission’s regulatory proposal for lifting geo-blocking restrictions in physical goods and non-copyrighted services. Session 1 focused on non-audiovisual copyrighted services such as online music and ebooks. On 25 April 2017 the European Parliament’s Committee on Internal Market and Consumer Protection voted in favor of extending the Commission's to these services. Bertin Martens presented his recent research work on the impact of removing geo-blocking restrictions on consumers and producers. His presentation was followed by a panel discussion about whether, and under what conditions, we should remove geo-blocking practices from such sectors. Session 2 dealed with geo-blocking measures in the audiovisual sector. Scott Marcus presented the Bruegel study on extending the scope of geo-blocking prohibition in the industry while experts commented on the associated arguments that go for or against such an extension.
Views: 341 Bruegel
Professor Michael Dougan: How the UK's 'internal market' is dependent on EU rules
 
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"Where is our open and rigorous debate about the choices being made by UK Government?" Ahead of Theresa May's speech, Professor Michael Dougan explains how the UK internal market is dependent on EU rules. Full transcript: http://bit.ly/2F5TxNu
Views: 5457 EU Law At Liverpool
Internal Energy Market and electricity system with Inge Bernaerts
 
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Shaping the power grid business -- a joint initiative of Vlerick Business School and Florence School of Regulation. Interview with Inge Bernaerts (Head of Unit, Internal Market II: Wholesale markets, electricity & gas, DG ENER, European Commission) for the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME -- Module 1. Interviewer: Annika Zorn (Coordinator Florence School of Regulation). Inge Bernaerts speaks about the major challenges the electricity system is currently facing, the future role and accountability of TSOs. She also gives an estimate on where we stand with the efficient and fair functioning of the wholesale electricity market. Inge also gives an outlook on the work her unit will be doing over the next year. Recommended reading for the interview: - Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, The European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions "Making the internal energy market work": http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=COM:2012:0663:FIN:EN:PDF Find more information on this executive training programme for power grid managers here: http://www.vlerick.com/powergrid more information on Florence School of Regulation www.florence-school.eu find more online teaching material of the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME here http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLObuk3UYC3P19dhToHCheYJO_mfhOaXKQ
Third Package of Internal Energy Market Legislation - Part 2  by Leigh Hancher
 
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Shaping the power grid business -- a joint initiative of Florence School of Regulation and Vlerick Business School Part 2 - Third Package of Internal Energy Market Legislation Video lecture by Leigh Hancher (Professor of European Law at Tilburg University and Director of the Law& Policy Area of Florence School of Regulation) for the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME. In this video lecture series Leigh Hancher gives an overview on the main elements of the Third Package of Internal Energy Market for the Liberalization of Gas& Electricity Markets in the European union. In the second part of her lecture series Leigh Hancher explains the principle of third part access and the principle of unbundling. Find more online teaching material of the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME here http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLObuk3UYC3P19dhToHCheYJO_mfhOaXKQ Find more information on this executive training programme for power grid managers here: http://www.vlerick.com/powergrid Find more information on Florence School of Regulation www.florence-school.eu
History: European Single Market
 
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Moving freely within the EU seems obvious today, but it was only in 1993 that this single market came into force. It's one of the EU's greatest achievements. With no more barriers or internal borders in the EU, the common market finally became a reality. It had been talked about since the Treaty of Rome which created the European Community in 1957. The creation of a common market was the main objective. The Chair of the Socialists and Democrats in the EP looks back on the goal at the time. It was the goal to give Europe a new boost, to have integration stepping forward, and to have free movement of goods, capital, services and human beings. You cannot build a common Europe without having a common market. On these four fundamental freedoms, the six founding Member States decided to build a real European Economic Community. The first notable advance was on 1 July 1968. The customs duties on goods circulating between Member States were completely removed. But we had to wait until 1985 for the leaders to decide to come back to the realisation of this single market. Wilfried Martens was the Belgian Prime Minister at the time and took part in the discussions. The single market was a response to a long-standing crisis after the oil crisis which caused a lot of inflation with rising prices and which therefore created unemployment. A common response was presented in 1985 by the European Commission under Jacques Delors. The Community decided to complete the construction of the great internal market in stages. It was to be finalised at the start of 1993. This ambitious goal and date were written into the Single European Act signed in February 1986. A whole series of internal barriers and borders within the European Community were gradually removed. So we had to adopt European laws - in total, I think, over 290 were adopted - to create the single market. In 1992 in Maastricht, the 12 Member States at the time went further than the Community's initial economic goal. After another crisis and following the fall of the Berlin Wall, monetary union was planned. The euro would come into use 10 years later. To counter the opposition from Britain's Margaret Thatcher, a proposal was made to Jacques Delors, Wilfried Martens recalls, to set up a system which is today called 'opting out'. So they could say that they accepted the principle, but 'opting out' meant they wouldn't enter the system. He said, 'It's possible.' And it's still the case. Great Britain and Denmark still have the opting out system. On 1 January 1993 the borders between EU countries disappeared physically. The common market made way for the European Single Market, generating over 2.5 million extra jobs and offering a market that covers nearly half a billion consumers. But the market has not been fully completed yet. The European Union was enlarged. New member countries came in and new competitive situations are there. We have a new competitive situation with China and other countries outside Europe. The most important thing is to establish this economic governance and to create this political union. 20 years on, the single market needs renewed impetus, but it remains to be seen whether the political will is there. But that's another story. EuroparlTV video ID: cd2f29e8-881a-4f11-bcf3-a07d010e9bf3
Views: 15375 European Parliament
Third Package of Internal Energy Market Legislation - Part 3  by Leigh Hancher
 
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Shaping the power grid business -- a joint initiative of Florence School of Regulation and Vlerick Business School Part 3 - Third Package of Internal Energy Market Legislation Video lecture by Leigh Hancher (Professor of European Law at Tilburg University and Director of the Law & Policy Area of Florence School of Regulation) for the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME. In this video lecture series Leigh Hancher gives an overview on the main elements of the Third Package of Internal Energy Market for the Liberalization of Gas& Electricity Markets in the European union. In the third part of her lecture series Leigh Hancher focuses on the regulation of grids and the role of national regulatory authorities and the interrelationship between national and European law. Find more online teaching material of the FUTURE POWER GRID MANAGERS PROGRAMME here http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLObuk3UYC3P19dhToHCheYJO_mfhOaXKQ Find more information on this executive training programme for power grid managers here: http://www.vlerick.com/powergrid Find more information on Florence School of Regulation www.florence-school.eu
Achieving the Internal Market | Panel Discussion
 
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Conference: State of the Union on EU Energy Policy -- 10 May 2012 Panel: Achieving the Internal Market Chair: Claude MANDIL (Former Director, International Energy Agency) Panellists: Inge BERNAERTS (Head of Unit, European Commission DG Energy), Guido BORTONI (President, Autorità per l'Energia Elettrica e il Gas - AEEG), Daniel DOBBENI (CEO, Elia; President, ENTSO-E), Juan PEREZ (Director - Strategy & Business Development, EPEX Spot), Alberto POTOTSCHNIG (Director, ACER), Pippo RANCI (Professor of Financial Ethics, Cattolica University) The European Union is said to achieve its Internal Energy Market by 2014. It has been underway since 1990. Why did it take so long? What does "achieving" mean? Who will achieve what? And al-so, what can EU citizens expect from such "achievement"? Lower prices? More stable prices? A better supply? A fairer equalisation of energy conditions all across Europe? Download the programme of the conference and all presentations http://fsr.eui.eu/Events/ENERGY/Conference/2012/120509StateUnion.aspx
The Digital Single Market [Policy Podcast]
 
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Recent estimates by the European Parliament suggest that moving from 28 national markets to a single one could contribute €415 billion per year to our economy and create millions of new jobs. The EU's single market is one of the greatest successes of European integration. But switch from the physical to the online, and you'll see the picture is not quite the same. Find out about the progress and challenges facing the EU digital single market in this EPRS policy podcast. Subscribe to EPRS Policy Podcasts: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/rss/en/audio-podcasts.html
Digital Single Market - latest developments
 
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With the aim of creating a seamless and consistent digital marketplace across the EU and fully tap into the growth potential of e-commerce, the European Commission is rolling out an ambitious series of legal initiatives. Our webinar reviews the latest developments for both e-commerce and copyright, as well as the overall structure of what is proposed, focusing specifically on the following topics: - Proposed changes to consumer regulation - Proposed changes to the copyright framework - What 2016 will hold for the Digital Single Market
Views: 246 Taylor Wessing LLP
Jean Arnold Vinois on Ireland, SEM and the Internal Electricity Market
 
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Creating a European Internal Energy Market by 2014 - Challenges and Opportunities for Ireland and Europe About the Seminar: The creation of a genuine internal market for energy is one of the European Union's priority objectives. A market that allowed gas and electricity to flow freely throughout the EU would provide cost and choice benefits for consumers as well as increasing market access for suppliers, including producers of small-scale and renewable forms of energy. This seminar will explore what needs to be done to establish such a market by 2014, the target set by the European Commission and Council. A focus of the seminar will be Ireland's Single Electricity Market (SEM) -- a wholesale market operating in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. As Ireland's SEM operates with dual currencies and in multiple jurisdictions, it is a useful case study when considering the challenges of creating an EU-wide market. Speakers will offer perspectives from Brussels, the UK and Ireland on what needs to be done between now and 2014, on the development of the SEM, on the construction and operation of the East-West Interconnector between Ireland and the UK, and on the ways in which the benefits of new and existing interconnectors can be maximised. About the Speakers: Speakers will include: - Jean Arnaud Vinois, Acting Director of the Internal Energy Market Directorate at the European Commission - Daniel Dobbeni, President of the European Network of Transmission System Operators for Electricity - Garrett Blaney, Commissioner at the Commission for Energy Regulation - Dermot Byrne, Chief Executive of EirGrid - Alison Kay, Commercial Director of Transmission at National Grid, UK
Views: 404 IIEA1
EU Law - Free Movement of Capital and the Economic and Monetary Union
 
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Under Art. 63 TFEU “all restrictions on the movement of capital…shall be prohibited”. This free movement of capital has vertical and horizontal direct effect as per Sanz de Lera [1995]. The freedom also includes the movement of capital between EU and third countries. Movement of capital is defined in a non-exhaustive list in Directive 88/361. The definition is broad and can include: Loans/ Investments; Heirs of the van Hiltern-van der Heijden [2006] Mortgages; Westdeutsche Landesbank v Stefan [2001] Shares; Test claimants in the FII Group [2006]. There are exceptions to the free movement of capital, the most clear of which is that state's retain the mandate when it comes to direct taxation as per Art. 65. However under Art. 65(3) this cannot be used to justify discrimination based on nationality (Verkooijen [2000]). The further exceptions under Art. 65(1)(b) are that action can be taken to prevent infringement of national law and, in a general sense, this allows for the effective administration of the tax system. Art. 65(3) applies again and there must be a direct link between the action taken the reason identified (ELISA [2007]). There is also a narrow exception in cases of public policy/security and here the measures must be proportional (Scientology International [2000]). The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) attempted to get started in 1969 but faced trouble in the form of floating exchange rates. Another attempt called the Economic Monetary System was attempted in 1978 but with limited success. The EMU itself had three stages: 1) Completion of the internal market 2) A European System of Central Banks 3) The locking of exchange rates and a single currency There are a number of advantages that theoretically apply to the EMU such as growth and investment but this has to be balanced against the difficulties of the 2008 financial crisis that was arguable exacerbated by the EMU. Nevertheless the EU is keen to double down on integration as seen in the Five President's Report that outlines a plan from 2015-2025. This will have to face the realities of the EMU in a global economy. The ECB has a great degree of independence (Art. 130) and is responsible for monetary policy. It can issue recommendations/opinions and even fines. The ESCB is the collection of national central banks alongside the ECB and seeks to control price stability. Finally the economic health of one Member State can have a knock-on effect on other Member States so attempts are made to co-ordinate economic policy. Multilateral surveillance under Art. 121 as well as the Stability and Growth Pact allows for concerns to be raised at Council level so that warnings and guidelines can be drawn up. There is also an excessive deficit procedure but the effectiveness of both of these mechanisms is questionable.
Views: 2425 marcuscleaver
EU regulations on cultural imports will destroy antiques trade - David Coburn MEP
 
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http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://www.ukip.org • European Parliament, Strasbourg, 24 October 2018 • David Coburn MEP, UK Independence Party (UKIP, Scotland), Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy (EFDD) group - @DavidCoburnUkip • Debate: Import of cultural goods - Report: Alessia Maria Mosca, Daniel Dalton (A8-0308/2018) Report on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the import of cultural goods [COM(2017)0375 - C8-0227/2017 - 2017/0158(COD)] Committee on International Trade Committee on the Internal Market and Consumer Protection .................... • Video: EbS (European Parliament) .................................. • EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Views: 396 UKIP MEPs
Online Platforms and the Digital Single Market | Lords EU Committee
 
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Chair of the Lords EU Internal Market Sub-Committee Lord Whitty summarising the findings of its report Online Platforms and the Digital Single Market. More information can be found at www.parliament.uk/hleub.
Views: 437 House of Lords
Clean Energy for All Europeans: Challenges and Opportunities
 
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The regulation and design of the internal market for electricity are currently under negotiation in Brussels. New rules, once agreed, will make the internal electricity market more flexible and competitive to give the right signals to investors and to empower consumers and businesses. Meanwhile, agreement has been reached by EU institutions in recent weeks on other key pieces of legislation concerning renewable energy, energy efficiency and the governance of the EU’s Energy Union flagship project, which will determine the Union’s energy and climate trajectory and investment agenda for the next decade. Drawing on his extensive experience, Professor Glachant outlined his views on the future of regulation and legislation of energy in the EU and Ireland. This event is the second of the 2018 ESB Lecture Series entitled The Electric Lifestyle. Filmed on the 16th of July 2018
Views: 117 IIEA1
Strengthening the Single Market - EU2016NL
 
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Key priorities of the Netherlands EU presidency were strengthening the European Single Market for companies, citizens and consumers such as better regulation in the Euorpean Union. This video shows the importance of improving these priorities within the European Union.
Views: 56 EU2016NL
Telecoms Single Market: cheaper mobile communications and open access to internet
 
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The ITRE Committee approved the Telecoms Single Market Regulation, which will put an end to roaming charges by mid-2017 and guarantee an open internet. Pilar del Castillo, EPP Group Rapporteur, said to EPPTV that this is one step forward in the completion of the single market and a success for consumers.
Views: 23 EPP Group