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The Costs and Benefits of Regulation
 
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AlexMerced.com
Views: 126 Alex Merced
Can Regulations Come With Unintended Costs? [Fourth Branch]
 
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https://www.RegProject.org | While the goals of regulations are often admirable, regulations may come with unintended consequences. Sometimes, regulations can hurt those they were intended to benefit. Susan Dudley, Director of the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center, discusses these unintended costs and her work at the Regulatory Studies Center. Visit our website – https://www.RegProject.org – to learn more, view all of our content, and connect with us on social media. * * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker. Differing Views: RTP Paper: "Government Regulation: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly" https://regproject.org/paper/government-regulation-the-good-the-bad-the-ugly/ Fourth Branch Video: "Regulation from Washington: Exploring Unseen Costs" https://regproject.org/fourth-branch-regulation-washington-exploring-unseen-costs/ "The Cumulative Cost of Regulations" by Bentley Coffey, Patrick McLaughlin, and Pietro Peretto https://www.mercatus.org/publication/cumulative-cost-regulations "Government Regulation: Costs Lower, Benefits Greater Than Industry Estimates" by The Pew Charitable Trusts http://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/fact-sheets/2015/05/government-regulation-costs-lower-benefits-greater-than-industry-estimates
Views: 15354 The Federalist Society
Regulation from Washington: Exploring Unseen Costs [Fourth Branch]
 
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https://RegProject.org | Regulations emanate from Washington and “affect every aspect of our lives, but we’re often unaware of it because they do so in hidden ways.” What are these effects and do they benefit American workers, companies, and consumers? A variety of experts on regulatory issues discuss this important question. Visit our website – https://RegProject.org – to learn more, view all of our content, and connect with us on social media. * * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers. Related Links: RTP Paper: "Government Regulation: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly" https://regproject.org/paper/government-regulation-the-good-the-bad-the-ugly/ Free Lunch Podcast: "Bureaucracy in America" https://regproject.org/free-lunch-podcast-e8/ Free Lunch Podcast: "Laws, Regulations, and 'Regulatory Dark Matter'" https://regproject.org/free-lunch-podcast-e5/ "Regulation 101" by the George Washington University Regulatory Studies Center https://regulatorystudies.columbian.gwu.edu/regulation-101
Views: 23822 The Federalist Society
Gerald Dorsett weighs costs and benefits of government regulation
 
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Elon University professor of environmental sciences Gerald Dorsett explains different perspectives on government regulation of North Carolina's $75 billion agricultural industry.
Views: 705 Bryan Anderson
Price Controls, Subsidies, and the Risks of Good Intentions: Crash Course Economics #20
 
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So, during times of inflation or deflation, why doesn't the government just set prices? It sounds reasonable, but price ceilings or floors just don't work. Adriene and Jacob explain why. Subsidies, however, are a little different, and sometimes they even work. We'll also explain that. Today you'll learn about stuff like price controls, deadweight loss, subsidies, and efficiency. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 410175 CrashCourse
Issa, Cummings Debate Costs, Benefits of Easing Business Regulations
 
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Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/dLdAMt Business leaders have long complained that government regulations are costly and threaten jobs, and the GOP-led House addressed the topic at a committee hearing. Judy Woodruff talks with two members of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform: Republican Darrell Issa and Democrat Elijah Cummings.
Views: 1065 PBS NewsHour
Price Ceilings and Floors- Economics 2.6
 
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In this video I explain what happens when the government controls market prices. Price ceilings are a legal maximum price and price floors are a minimum legal price. Make sure that you can draw each of them on a demand and supply graph and identify if there is a shortage or a surplus. Keep in mind that your teacher may use the word "binding" to describe the situation where the price control has an effect on the market. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Next videos showing what happens to consumer surplus, producer surplu, and dead weight loss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n0LXkA9kato All Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF... All Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3... Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 689014 Jacob Clifford
Why Prescription Drugs Cost So Much | Michael Rea | TEDxKC
 
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Would you be mad if you found out you were paying as much as 2000% more than your neighbor for a prescription? Furious, Michael Rea left his job as a pharmacist eight years ago to pursue a solution to the runaway cost of prescription drugs. Dr. Michael Rea founded Rx Savings Solutions in 2008 after routinely witnessing consumers struggling to pay for their medications. He noticed quickly at that time that consumers were paying much more than they needed to, which was attributable to a lack of information available to them. He set out on his mission to arm consumers with this information and add efficiency and transparency back into the world of pharmacy. Dr. Rea has been involved with research surrounding pharmacy transparency for over 10 years. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy degree from Creighton University. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
Views: 31052 TEDx Talks
The Eye-popping Cost of Federal Regulations
 
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The New American senior editor, Bill Jasper describes the mind blowing size, cost and wastefulness of our federal regulatory state. According to the Competitive Enterprise Institute’s “Ten Thousand Commandments” report, the federal regulations took nearly a two trillion bite out the U.S. economy in 2013. Will you allow the federal regulatory monsters to devour our wealth and our freedoms or are you going to hold your congressmen accountable? Use The New American’s Freedom Index to hold your congressmen accountable: http://www.thenewamerican.com/freedom-index More news at: http://www.thenewamerican.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheNewAmerican Twitter: https://twitter.com/NewAmericanMag
One Reason Homes Cost So Much
 
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Very high house prices aren’t an act of God or a fact of nature. They’re the result of all sorts of policy and design mistakes – which we should try to understand and correct. Please subscribe here: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7 If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Vale Productions http://www.valeproductions.co.uk #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 1137605 The School of Life
The Economics of Healthcare: Crash Course Econ #29
 
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Why is health care so expensive? Once again, there are a lot of factors in play. Jacob and Adriene look at the many reasons that health care in the US is so expensive, and what exactly we get for all that money. Spoiler alert: countries that spend less and get better results are not that uncommon. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 573200 CrashCourse
Costs and Rate of Return Regulation
 
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Overview of costs and rate of return regulation.
Views: 973 Trevor Roycroft
Federal Regulations will Impact Your Transportation Costs
 
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Recent federal rulemakings will impact your business. How? CSA scores have been removed from public view, so you need other ways of tracking which carriers you can safely do business with. Our ShipperShield tool is a great way to do this, assembling insurance, financial, and safety information into one constantly updated digital cabinet. Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) are going into effect as well as enforcement regarding Driver Coercion. We have a great resource for you to learn about how these are going to impact you: a webinar featuring subject matter experts on January 13, 2015. We are bringing this webinar to you in conjunction with TIA and NASSTRAC, and you can get more information at www.tranzact.com We bring these tools are resources to you because we want to help you be successful. We have a number of additional tools and services to better your supply chain and save on your transportation spend. Go to www.tranzact.com to learn more about how we can help you obtain better LTL Rates and Truckload Rates. Give us a call today at 630.833.0890 or send us an e-mail at [email protected]
Regulations and their costs to our Economy
 
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Bret Swanson, President of Entropy Economics and U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation scholar dispels some myths about Regulations and highlights some unseen negative impacts of the Regulatory process.
Taxes on Producers- Microeconomics 2.11 ACDC Econ
 
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I explain excise taxes any show what happens to consumer surplus, producer surplus, and deadweight loss as a result of a tax. Make sure to watch the section about tax incidence and who pays the majority of a tax.
Views: 641442 Jacob Clifford
ARB Chair's Lecture Series: Estimating the Costs & Benefits of Regulations
 
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On March 14, 2014, Richard D. Morgenstern, Ph.D. of Resources for the Future (RFF) spoke at the CalEPA Headquarters. Dr. Morgenstern, former Senior Economic Counselor to the Undersecretary for Global Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, where he participated in negotiations for the Kyoto Protocol, discussed lessons learned from the past 30 years when it comes to estimating the costs and benefits of environmental regulations. Federal, state and local environmental laws have achieved significant improvements in public health over the past several decades. These regulations also have resulted in growing scrutiny about the costs and benefits of environmental rules. His lecture highlighted pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results and proposes a way to conduct retrospective analyses in the future — to ensure that the estimation of regulatory costs is as targeted and focused as the underlying environmental regulations. For more information on this seminar or on upcoming ARB lectures, please visit: http://www.arb.ca.gov/research/lectures/lectures.htm
Market Failures, Taxes, and Subsidies: Crash Course Economics #21
 
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This week on Crash Course Econ, Jacob and Adriene are talking about failure. Specifically, we're talking about market failures. When markets don't provide a good or service efficiently, that's a market failure. When markets fail, often governments step in to provide those services. Stuff like public education or military protection are good examples of market failures. So, what are some of the ways governments address, market failures? Well, it's funny you should ask, as we also talk about that in this episode. We'll get into taxes and subsidies and externalities and a bunch of other important stuff this week on Crash Course Econ. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 670668 CrashCourse
Monopoly Graph Review and Practice- Micro 4.7
 
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I explain how to draw and anaylze a monopoly graph. Make sure to answer the questions and check out the bonus dance at the end. No! We can't play the board game.Thanks for watching. Please subscribe. Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 755549 Jacob Clifford
Regulating Monopolies: A History of Electricity Regulation - Learn Liberty
 
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Prof. Lynne Kiesling discusses the history of regulating electricity monopolies in America. Conventionally, most people view regulation of monopoly, such as the Sherman Antitrust Act, as one of government's core responsibilities. Kiesling challenges this notion, and finds that government regulation of monopoly actually stifles innovation and hurts consumers. The American electricity industry was booming in the 1890s, with several small firms competing against one another. Over time, Kiesling argues that the fixed costs began to escalate, increasing the cost of entry into the industry. Put another way, large competitors gained a significant competitive edge over smaller competitors through economies of scale. Eventually, in places like New York and Chicago, Kiesling claims that the competitive process led to one large firm. These monopolies were feared by the public, and led to demands for government regulation. The electricity industry, knowing that regulation was coming, used these demands for regulation as cover to construct legal barriers to entry. Ultimately, the regulations passed by the government reduced competition by granting legal monopoly privileges to powerful firms within a certain geographical territory. In modern times, we are seeing the real cost of these old one-size-fits-all regulations: 1) People aren't adjusting their energy consumption behaviors. For instance, in peak hours, technological solutions that could smooth electricity consumption are being ignored. 2) The electricity industry doesn't evolve and account for new types of renewable energy. 3) Innovations have been discouraged. If these archaic regulations were removed, innovations and improvements beneficial to consumers would flourish. For more information, check us out here: http://lrnlbty.co/zcPIQr Watch more videos: http://lrnlbty.co/y5tTcY
Views: 52758 Learn Liberty
Monopolies and Anti-Competitive Markets: Crash Course Economics #25
 
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What is a monopoly? It turns out, it's more than just a board game. It's a terrible, terrible economic practice in which giant corporations dominate markets and hurt consumers. Except when it isn't. In some industries, monopolies are the most efficient way to do business. Utilities like electricity, water, and broadband internet access are probably less efficiently delivered in competitive markets. Come along, and let us monopolize your attention for a few minutes. You might learn something. And you might land on Free Parking. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 517154 CrashCourse
Regulation Nation: Doug's Story
 
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AmericanJobCreators.com: Tell Us How Government Regulation Hurting Your Business The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee released "Regulation Nation: Doug's Story," a new video underscoring how regulatory compliance costs are costing California businesses like San Bernardino based Western HiWays. Doug Grove, safety director of Western HiWays, explains how Washington regulators are stampeding California's highways with insurmountable rules and regulations without first considering the costs. The Subcommittee on Regulatory Affairs, Stimulus Oversight, and Government Spending held a hearing on November 30, 2011 investigating how the Department of Transportation's hours of service regulation will force commercial vehicles operators like Western HiWays to restrict drive times for its drivers. By the Obama Administration's own estimates, regulatory compliance could exceed $2.31 billion annually.
Ben Lieberman on Government Regulations
 
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Senior Fellow in Environmental Policy Ben Lieberman discusses the extent of federal regulations in our daily lives. He notes that new efficiency standards for appliances will ultimately increase costs for consumers.
Environmental Econ: Crash Course Economics #22
 
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So, if economics is about choices and how we use our resources, econ probably has a lot to say about the environment, right? Right! In simple terms, pollution is just a market failure. The market is producing more pollution than society wants. This week, Adriene and Jacob focus on the environment, and how economics can be used to control and reduce pollution and emissions. You'll learn about supply and demand, incentives, and how government intervention influences the environment. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 317733 CrashCourse
The Cost of Regulation
 
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Each year, CEI Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews writes a comprehensive report on the state of the expanding federal regulatory state, called Ten Thousand Commandments. Several key figures from the report are highlighted in this segment on Special Report with Bret Baier. The full report can be viewed here: http://cei.org/10kc
Ben Lieberman on consumer costs of regulations
 
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CEI Senior Fellow in Environmental Policy Ben Lieberman explains how new environmental regulations for household appliances will end up costing consumers more money. These increased costs can even exceed the amount saved from decreased energy use. Ben also discusses how the government takes away choices from the consumer by regulating items such as washing machines and incandescent light bulbs.
Negative Externalities of Consumption as a Market Failure
 
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In this lesson we're going to examine a different example of market failure, one in which it is the consumption of a good that creates negative costs for society. In such a market, private consumers of the good benefit more from its consumption than society as a whole. Consider the example of tourists in a beach town who consume too large amounts of alcohol while on their vacation. Such individuals are just enjoying themselves, and probably have a blast getting drunk, but in the process they create lots of trouble for the local community in the beach town. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 108714 Jason Welker
Why Can't Chuck Get His Business Off the Ground?
 
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http://iam.ij.org/9uFUX3 How can Americans create private sector jobs? The solution to America's jobs problem lies not with budget-busting federally mandated "stimulus" programs. Instead, what is needed are specific reforms that wouldn't cost taxpayers, would create a broader tax base for cash-strapped cities and states, and would provide opportunity for millions of Americans who worry where their next paycheck is coming from. As demonstrated by a series of eight new reports issued in October 2010 by the Virginia-based Institute for Justice, one of the principal obstacles to creating new jobs and entrepreneurial activity in cities across the country is the complex maze of regulations cities and states impose on small businesses. IJ's "city study" reports are filled with real-world examples of specific restrictions that often make it impossible for entrepreneurs to create jobs for themselves, let alone for others. Chip Mellor, the president and general counsel of the Institute for Justice, said, "If the nation is looking to the federal government to create jobs in America, it is looking in the wrong place. If we want to grow our economy, we must remove government-imposed barriers to honest enterprise at the city and state levels. Remove those barriers, and you will see a return to the optimism and opportunity that are hallmarks of the American Dream." IJ's eight reports document how irrational and anti-competitive regulations block entrepreneurship. More often than not, these government-imposed restrictions on economic liberty are put in place at the behest of existing businesses that are not shy about using government force to keep out competition. The Institute for Justice's city studies examine regulations imposed on a wide range of occupations in Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Milwaukee, Newark, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C.
Views: 227040 InstituteForJustice
Political Campaigns: Crash Course Government and Politics #39
 
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So political campaigns are a pretty big deal in the United States. For instance the 2012 presidential election clocked in at the most expensive ever - at around $6 billion dollars! Needless to say, money plays a very big role in American elections. So today, Craig is going to take a look at why we have campaigns in the first place, why the campaign seasons run for so long, and of course why campaigns cost so much. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 388722 CrashCourse
Building societies: Regulation costs will be passed to consumers
 
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Consumers are likely to pay the price of increased regulation on the banking industry, the Building Societies Association has warned. Speaking at the organisation's annual lunch, chairman Graham Beale said that regulation and state backing for part-nationalised banks is proving damaging for building societies. He added that the current level of retail pricing on savings products is 'unsustainable', with demand for accounts pushing rates up to 'uneconomic levels'. This, according to Mr Beale, could lead to a fall in savings rates, or, more likely, an increase in the cost of borrowing.
Views: 59 MyFinancesBulletin
The High Costs of Lead Regulation
 
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How to Kill Business 101: An Insider's Look at How Over-Regulation Is Killing Our Economy. Watch the full event video here: http://www.aei.org/event/100439 Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #news #politics #government #education
JP Nadda on Regulation of Medical Costs & National Health Policy
 
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In this Idea Exchange, moderated by Assistant Editor Abantika Ghosh, Health Minister JP Nadda insists that having AIIMS centers across the country “won't dilute” the brand, rejects reports of rise in prices of essential drugs, complains that government sector health success stories are not talked about, dismisses AAP threat in state elections and says he will request PM Modi to endorse population control campaign after coming up with a plan.
Views: 245 IndianExpressOnline
Government regulation: Where do we go from here? (1977) | ARCHIVES
 
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December 19, 1977: This AEI Public Policy Forum deals with the growth of government regulation, which has stimulated increasing debate in recent years in academic, political, and public policy circles. The issues discussed here range from the practical implementation of given policy objectives to the philosophical basis on which these objectives are decided. Some argue that to improve regulatory activities, a total reassessment of government's role in the private economy is required. Others maintain that past shortcomings result from poorly coordinated government policies. Thus, future policies turn on a consideration of economic incentives and other means of attaining regulatory goals and on a rational assessment of the costs and benefits of each regulatory activity. Panelists: John C. Danforth — Senator (R-Missouri) William Proxmire — Senator (D-Wisconsin) Paul W. MacAvoy — professor of economics at Yale University Harrison Welford — executive associate director for reorganization and management of the Office of Management and Budget Moderator: John Charles Daly Host: Peter Hackes In 1977, transcripts were available by mail for a small fee. Today, they're available to you for free at this link: https://goo.gl/M3uW7W Subscribe to AEI's YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/user/AEIVideos?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AEIonline Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/AEI For more information http://www.aei.org Music credit: BY – "synthwave" by places https://goo.gl/BwJKUt Music marked "BY" is used under Creative Commons Attribution License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/ Third-party photos, graphics, and video clips in this video may have been cropped or reframed. Music in this video may have been recut from its original arrangement and timing. In the event this video uses Creative Commons assets: If not noted in the description, titles for Creative Commons assets used in this video can be found at the link provided after each asset. The use of third-party photos, graphics, video clips, and/or music in this video does not constitute an endorsement from the artists and producers licensing those materials. AEI operates independently of any political party and does not take institutional positions on any issues. AEI scholars, fellows, and their guests frequently take positions on policy and other issues. When they do, they speak for themselves and not for AEI or its trustees or other scholars or employees. More information on AEI research integrity can be found here: http://www.aei.org/about/ #aei #news #politics #government #education #economy #economics #budget #regulation #law
Issa: There Must be a Balance Between Costs & Benefits of Regulation
 
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Representative Darrell Issa speaks on behalf of American Job Creators about the need for federal regulatory reform on CSNBC's Squawk Box. 2-10-11: CNBC Squawk Box with Carl Quintanilla
Views: 144 Rep. Darrell Issa
How changing energy production and storage costs affect network regulation and market design
 
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Lecture given by Professor Dr Justus Haucap on 22 March 2017. Electricity markets around the world are experiencing significant changes. As costs for small-and large-scale generation from wind and solar energy fall, as do battery costs, the current regulatory framework and market governance need to adapt in order to account for generation operating with zero (short-term) marginal cost. The presentation will particularly report on the experience of Germany’s energy turnaround (“Energiewende”), where the fraction of solar and wind energy has increased from less than 10 percent to almost 35 percent over the last 10 years, with the Government’s goal of increasing this share even further up to at least 50 percent until 2030. Given the different cost structures for electricity production, increasing fluctuation of supply and slowly decreasing storage costs both the regulation of network charges and electricity market design are under scrutiny.
Views: 534 ElectricityNZ
Bonner Speaks Against Costly Government Regulations
 
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Congressman Bonner speaks out against burdensome federal regulations on business which hurt job growth and the economic recovery, October 5, 2011
Views: 115 JoBonner
Regulation & the American Dream [Fourth Branch]
 
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Arguably, regulation has helped us achieve the American Dream. The benefits are numerous. But have regulations gone too far? The Regulatory Transparency Project’s Fourth Branch video series will explore this question. The Fourth Branch video series is a product of the Regulatory Transparency Project. The RTP is a years-long endeavor designed to reach and to educate a broad audience. The purpose, in part, is to illustrate that regulatory excess is not a partisan issue but, a good government issue. We believe that such an approach can lead to both immediate changes and, more importantly, development of a healthy societal understanding of both regulatory benefits and costs. Visit our website – www.RegProject.org – to subscribe to our newsletter updates, to view all of our content, and to connect with us on social media. * * * * * As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speakers. Related Links: RTP Paper: "Government Regulation: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly" https://regproject.org/paper/government-regulation-the-good-the-bad-the-ugly/ "Saving Lives Through Administrative Law" by John D. Graham https://www.law.upenn.edu/live/files/110-graham157upalrev3952008pdf "The Regulatory State" by Christopher DeMuth https://www.nationalaffairs.com/publications/detail/the-regulatory-state "4 Steps to a Working Regulatory System" by William Kovacs https://www.uschamber.com/above-the-fold/4-steps-working-regulatory-system
Views: 40027 The Federalist Society
Extremism at the EPA: A Discussion on Federal Overreach, Regulation Costs, and Climate Realities
 
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On June 2, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed the next step in its climate change agenda with a draft rule that would cap carbon dioxide emissions and greenhouse gases from existing power plants. In doing so, the EPA used questionable science, ignored climate realities, and discounted major investments around the world to build power plants. This rule will significantly reduce the use of coal as an efficient and inexpensive source of reliable power in America, if the EPA is allowed to succeed in finalizing it in addition to other climate change regulations already in the books or on the way. The consequences will be lost jobs and higher energy costs for American families and businesses with no meaningful reduction in global emissions or temperatures.
EU over-regulation costs UK £49 billion a year - Gerad Batten MEP
 
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http://www.ukipmeps.org • European Parliament, Strasbourg, 6 June 2011 • Speaker: Gerard Batten MEP, UKIP (London), Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) group. • Debate: (A7-0159/2011 - 138) NIEBLER JURI - Guaranteeing independent impact assessments .................................. Video source: EbS (European Parliament) .................................. • EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Views: 698 UKIP MEPs
The Economic Costs of Government Activism
 
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ORIGINALLY RECORDED March 15, 2011 Former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan argues that government activism during the past two years is the primary culprit for the tepid recovery and high unemployment. SPEAKER: Alan Greenspan, President, Greenspan Associates LLC; Former Chairman, Federal Reserve PRESIDER: Roger C. Altman, Founder and Chairman, Evercore Partners, Inc. http://www.cfr.org/united-states/economic-costs-government-activism-video/p24369
10,000 Commandments
 
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In 2007, the cost of federal regulation soared to over $1 trillion dollars. Wayne Crews of the Competitive Enterprise Institute released his 10,000 commandments for 2008. In his report, he illustrates where the money is going. Mind you, these costs are hidden taxes passed on to you the unsuspecting public.
Ben Shapiro: How to Fix Healthcare
 
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Don't let Cenk forget this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEW1GY1iGok
Views: 76482 Zane
Why Government Websites Cost More Than Mapping The Human Brain
 
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A couple weeks ago, President Obama announced a [new research initiative to map the human brain](http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/04/02/brain-initiative-challenges-researchers-unlock-mysteries-human-mind) -- making a significant investment of $100 Million Dollars to prevent, treat and cure brain injuries. This is a website called Sam.gov. It launched late last year, and it's the central hub responsible for all the databases behind government contracting. The [GAO estimates](http://www.gao.gov/assets/590/589370.pdf) that this website will cost the taxpayer $181 Million dollars. I'd like to say that this is just a one-off anomaly, but government *regularly pays millions of dollars* for websites. So how did we get to the point where the cost of mapping the human brain costs less than a complicated website? The first reason is because of something called Procurement. It's *how* government, or really any large institution buys things. Right now, procurement law is regulated by the [Federal Acquisition Regulation](http://acquisition.gov/far/index.html?menu_id=40). It's about 6,000 pages of regulation that ensure that contracts go to people who [understand the law the best](http://www.sba.gov/sba-learning-center/search/training/government-contracting), not [the people who can do the best job](http://github.com). Related to that, is that the field of technology and the field of government don't speak the same language. This makes it so that when you, as a small business want to, say, bid on a website, you can search [bidding systems](http://fbo.gov) for the word "website" but you won't get relevant results. Or if you do, it's not obvious what to do with them. Finally, inside of government, the tools suck. Because government can't get affordable technology, it means that the people whose job it is to negotiate contracts and get the most value for the taxpayer are often bogged down with the worst tools, or doing menial data entry work. All of this leads to a closed, anti-competitive marketplace that makes it hard for small businesses to compete, and hard for the taxpayer to get the best price. So we're creating a new social venture called the [Department of Better Technology](http://dobt.co). It's Open. For Business. See -- much of the efforts around open government have been around government's relationship with the citizen. And they're great, and vital. But if you take a look at something like [Recovery.gov](http://recovery.gov) -- built by government to provide oversight on the Recovery funding from 2009 -- open government is really hard for government to sustain. It cost the taxpayer [$18 Million](http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2009/07/18m-being-spent-to-redesign-recoverygov-web-site/). So we're going upstream -- to equip government with better technology that will drive down the cost of opening up, and spur economic development by making it easier for governments to engage with the innovative companies in their own back yards. Our first step with that is a product called [Procure.io](https://github.com/dobtco/procure-io). It's based on technology we made for the [Presidential Innovation Fellowship program](http://www.whitehouse.gov/innovationfellows/rfp-ez). It makes it easier for people like you to find potential projects to bid on, take a look at them, monitor them for updates, ask questions about them, and bid on them. At the same time, it provides people inside the government with the tools they need to manage these procurements well. It gives them the ability to customize project descriptions, create custom response fields for easy management later, and a simple, familiar interface. What did we find when we did this for the Federal Government? We found, in this pilot experiment that the system reduced cost -- the bids coming through the system were much lower than bids coming in through traditional means. But we also found we increased engagement -- many of the bids that came in were from businesses that had not ordinarily contracted with the federal government before. And finally, we increased speed -- bids came in faster, meaning procurements can be done more quickly with the right tools. The next phase of open government revolves around procurement. Anybody that's interested in government being more transparent, more participatory, or more accountable, has to care about it. We do. That's why we've made Procure.io open source, ready for any city, state or enterprise to take and use as they see fit. And if they need some help, the Department of Better Technology is here to help support it. Just email us at hello at dobt dot co. We're from the department of technology, and we're here to help.
Views: 2958 Clay Johnson
The Economic Costs of the EPA's ANPR Regulations
 
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David Kreutzer, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst for Energy Economics at The Heritage Foundation, discusses how the Environmental Protection Agencys Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR) foreshadows new regulations of unprecedented scope, magnitude, and detail on carbon dioxide emissions in the U.S.
Challenges in the regulation of high cost treatments - An overview from Latin America
 
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Ms. Lara Pereira and Ms. Daniela Sturzenegger - ANVISA Patients deserve access to the most effective and safe treatments. At the same time, pharmaceutical companies face high costs in drug development, manufacturing and marketing and therefore many are focusing on novel treatments that can provide high-profit margins. In countries where most of the population depends on Public Healthcare Systems, e.g. “SUS” in Brazil, how should ANVISA address the increasing portfolio of high-cost treatments in the face of the country’s limited government budget?
Views: 363 Stanford Video
The Big Story: MPs demand regulation of healthcare costs in the country
 
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The Big Story: MPs demand regulation of healthcare costs in the country SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel for more great videos: https://www.youtube.com/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/KTNNews Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KTNNewsKenya For more great content go to http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/ktnnews and download our apps: http://std.co.ke/apps/#android KTN News is a leading 24-hour TV channel in Eastern Africa with its headquarters located along Mombasa Road, at Standard Group Centre. This is the most authoritative news channel in Kenya and beyond.
Views: 1502 KTN News Kenya
More Regulation, More Europe, More Costs - Steven Woolfe MEP
 
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http://www.ukipmeps.org | http://www.ukip.org • European Parliament, Strasbourg, 18 January 2016 • Steven Woolfe MEP, UK Independence Party (North West), Europe of Freedom and Direct Democracy (EFDD) group http://www.stevenwoolfe.uk/ | @Steven_Woolfe • Debate: Stocktaking and challenges of the EU Financial Services Regulation - Report: Burkhard Balz (A8-0360/2015) Report on stocktaking and challenges of the EU Financial Services Regulation: impact and the way forward towards a more efficient and effective EU framework for Financial Regulation and a Capital Markets Union [2015/2106(INI)] Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs ...................... • Video: EbS (European Parliament) .................................. EU Member States: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Germany, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, Finland, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Views: 352 UKIP MEPs
National Center Explains Real Costs of New EPA Coal Regulations
 
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National Center Senior Fellow Tom Borelli, Ph.D, notes that new EPA coal regulations could hurt job growth and impact the power supply on the 8/14/11 edition of "America's News Headquarters" with host Eric Shawn on the Fox News Channel. Tom explains that the new EPA regulations may actually shrink America's power supply, which could kill jobs, and increase energy costs. Tom says, "the last thing our economy needs is more people on the unemployment line." Tom also notes that coal plants are already closing some plants in reaction to the EPA regulations.
Jawn Murray Talks TSA Regulations & College Tuition Costs Rise on CNN
 
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Pop Culture Expert & TV Journalist Jawn Murray talks new TSA regulations and the rising costs of college tuition on CNN's "Newsroom with Brooke Baldwin" on March 6, 2013. For more on Jawn, go to http://www.JawnMurray.com or http://www.AlwaysAList.com. Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for fair use for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED
Views: 65 JawnMurray
Bank of England to look more closely at costs of financial regulation
 
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By David Milliken LONDON (Reuters) - The Bank of England will study the cumulative economic costs of financial regulations introduced since the global financial crisis, it said on Tuesday, after the government told it to help promote competition and investment. Britain spent billions bailing out failing banks in 2008 and 2009. Despite continued public anger over the role of the banks in that crisis, however, chancellor George Osborne has signalled the Conservative government wants to move on since winning re-election in May. Osborne has cut a tax targeting the largest banks and sped up the sale of public stakes in Lloyds and RBS . Last month he also tweaked the remit of the BoE body which looks for risks to financial stability to ensure it also took account of the need to boost investment and for more competition in the financial sector. In his first formal response to the new remit for the BoE's Financial Policy Committee, Governor Mark Carney welcomed how financial stability remained its main goal and said the FPC would examine whether some rules were counter-productive. "The Committee will ... assess the cumulative effects of reforms to make the financial system more resilient and consider whether in aggregate they have unintended undesirable effects," Carney wrote in a public letter to Osborne. "Where appropriate, the Committee will consider whether the improvements in resilience from those reforms could be achieved in ways that are further supportive of strong, sustained and balanced growth." Bankers and others including the chief executive of the government's debt issuance agency have blamed tougher regulation for reducing liquidity in bond markets, making them more volatile. Many rule changes since the financial crisis have still to take effect, and the BoE has said some banks remain 'too big to fail' and could not be wound up safely if trouble hit. Former FPC member Robert Jenkins said existing rules would be ineffective even when fully implemented, and said they managed to be both too complex and not rigorous enough. "I would happily trade a reduction in both regulation and regulators for an increase in capital requirements. If we resolve 'too big to fail' and require genuine accountability for failure, then we can and should roll back the rule book," he said. Jenkins is now a senior fellow at Better Markets, a U.S. group which campaigns against lax regulation, and said calls for more competition often cloaked an attempt to reduce oversight. "These are all false choices but have gained traction among policymakers subject to finance's formidable influence," he said. (Editing by Gareth Jones)
Views: 17 News Of The WorlD