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FIN 401 - WACC (Cost of Debt) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 50509 AllThingsMathematics
Estimating The Cost Of Debt For WACC - DCF Model Insights
 
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In today’s video, we learn about calculating the cost of debt used in the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) calculation. This is part of the DCF insights series for more advanced students but it offers valuable insights about the assumptions used in the model. Like many other segments of the discounted cash flow (DCF) model, the cost of debt is very important. The four methods covered in the video are; - Yield to maturity (YTM) approach - Debt rating approach - Synthetic Rating Approach - Interest on Debt Approach Link to the country default spread and risk premium database; http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~adamodar/New_Home_Page/datafile/ctryprem.html Link to the bond profile for Apple Inc used in the video; http://quicktake.morningstar.com/stocknet/bonds.aspx?symbol=aapl&country=arg Link to an amazing presentation summarizing the DCF Model by Aswath Damodaran; http://people.stern.nyu.edu/adamodar/pdfiles/eqnotes/basics.pdf Please like and subscribe to my channel for more content every week. If you have any questions, please comment below. For those who may be interested in finance and investing, I suggest you check out my Seeking Alpha profile where I write about the market and different investment opportunities. I conduct a full analysis on companies and countries while also commenting on relevant news stories. http://seekingalpha.com/author/robert-bezede/articles#regular_articles
Views: 5742 FinanceKid
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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Why buy a bond that pays no interest? This video helps you understand what a zero coupon bond is and how it can be beneficial. It details when you should expect to receive a return after buying a zero coupon bond and some of its unique features. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 41459 Zions TV
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 566444 Khan Academy
WACC, Cost of Equity, and Cost of Debt in a DCF
 
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In this WACC and Cost of Equity tutorial, you'll learn how changes to assumptions in a DCF impact variables like the Cost of Equity, Cost of Debt. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" You'll also learn about WACC (Weighted Average Cost of Capital) - and why it is not always so straightforward to answer these questions in interviews. Table of Contents: 2:22 Why Everything is Interrelated 4:22 Summary of Factors That Impact a DCF 6:37 Changes to Debt Percentages in the Capital Structure 11:38 The Risk-Free Rate, Equity Risk Premium, and Beta 12:49 The Tax Rate 14:55 Recap and Summary Why Do WACC, the Cost of Equity, and the Cost of Debt Matter? This is a VERY common interview question: "If a company goes from 10% debt to 30% debt, does its WACC increase or decrease?" "What if the Risk-Free Rate changes? How is everything else impacted?" "What if the company is bigger / smaller?" Plus, you need to use these concepts on the job all the time when valuing companies… these "costs" represent your opportunity cost from investing in a specific company, and you use them to evaluate that company's cash flows and determine how much the company is worth to you. EX: If you can get a 10% yield by investing in other, similar companies in this market, you'd evaluate this company's cash flows against that 10% "discount rate"… …and if this company's debt, tax rate, or overall size changes, you better know how the discount rate also changes! It could easily change the company's value to you, the investor. The Most Important Concept… Everything is interrelated - in other words, more debt will impact BOTH the equity AND the debt investors! Why? Because additional leverage makes the company riskier for everyone involved. The chance of bankruptcy is higher, so the "cost" even to the equity investors increases. AND: Other variables like the Risk-Free Rate will end up impacting everything, including Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt, because both of them are tied to overall interest rates on "safe" government bonds. Tricky: Some changes only make an impact when a company actually has debt (changes to the tax rate), and you can't always predict how the value derived from a DCF will change in response to this. Changes to the DCF Analysis and the Impact on Cost of Equity, Cost of Debt, WACC, and Implied Value: Smaller Company: Cost of Debt, Equity, and WACC are all higher. Bigger Company: Cost of Debt, Equity, and WACC are all lower. * Assuming the same capital structure percentages - if the capital structure is NOT the same, this could go either way. Emerging Market: Cost of Debt, Equity, and WACC are all higher. No Debt to Some Debt: Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt are higher. WACC is lower at first, but eventually higher. Some Debt to No Debt: Cost of Equity and Cost of Debt are lower. It's impossible to say how WACC changes because it depends on where you are in the "U-shaped curve" - if you're above the debt % that minimizes WACC, WACC will decrease. Otherwise, if you're at that minimum or below it, WACC will increase. Higher Risk-Free Rate: Cost of Equity, Debt, and WACC are all higher; they're all lower with a lower Risk-Free Rate. Higher Equity Risk Premium and Higher Beta: Cost of Equity is higher, and so is WACC; Cost of Debt doesn't change in a predictable way in response to these. When these are lower, Cost of Equity and WACC are both lower. Higher Tax Rate: Cost of Equity, Debt, and WACC are all lower; they're higher when the tax rate is lower. ** Assumes the company has debt - if it does not, taxes don't make an impact because there is no tax benefit to interest paid on debt.
#1 Cost of Capital [Cost of Debt, Preference Shares, Equity and Retained Earnings] ~ FM
 
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Described the procedure and concept to calculate cost of Debt, Cost of Preference Shares, Cost of Equity and Cost of Retained Earnings. Student can also watch the following lectures related with the Financial Management : 1. Capital Budgeting (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOaGNDmKpzo 2. Present Value of Perpetuity : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVxvJ_JTiug 3. Time Value of Money (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeox8DLagHU 4. Leverage Analysis (Introduction) Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3l1iB_-xZBw 5. Cash Budget (Introduction) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1Yx5bFOZfo 🔴 Connect on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ca.naresh.aggarwal 🔴 Download Assignments: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing 🔴 Connect with Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+CANareshAggarwal #CostOfCapital #FinancialManagement
Views: 219494 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
CIMA F2 Redeemable debt
 
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CIMA F2 Redeemable debt Free lectures for the CIMA F2 Advanced Financial Reporting Exams
Views: 6304 OpenTuition
How to Price/Value Bonds - Formula, Annual, Semi-Annual, Market Value, Accrued Interest
 
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http://www.subjectmoney.com http://www.subjectmoney.com/definitiondisplay.php?word=Bond%20Pricing In this video we show you how to calculate the value or price of a bond. We teach you the present value formula and then use examples to discount the coupon payments and principle payment to their present value. We also show you how to solve the price of a semi-annual bond. In this case you would multiply the periods by two and divide the YTM and coupon payments by 2. We also show you how to solve the accrued interest of a bond to find out what it would sell for at a date that is not on the exact coupon payment date. https://www.youtube.com/user/Subjectmoney https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zCqoED8MVk http://www.roofstampa.com hjttp://roofstampa.com http:/www.subjectmoney.com http://www.excelfornoobs.com
Views: 90197 Subjectmoney
How to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity
 
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This video will show you how to calculate the bond price and yield to maturity in a financial calculator. If you need to find the Present value by hand please watch this video :) http://youtu.be/5uAICRPUzsM There are more videos for EXCEL as well Like and subscribe :) Please visit us at http://www.i-hate-math.com Thanks for learning
Views: 310790 I Hate Math Group, Inc
Types of Debt
 
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Senior and subordinated debt refer to their rank in a company’s capital stack. In the event of a liquidation, senior debt is paid out first while subordinated debt is paid out after. Mezzanine debt is a non-tradeable security, which is subordinated to senior debt. Click here to learn more about this topic: https://corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/finance/senior-and-subordinated-debt/
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 550959 Khan Academy
Pricing a Bond with Yield To Maturity, Lecture 013, Securities Investment 101, Video 00015
 
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In this lecture, we price the same standard bond given three different ratings agency ratings, which has given us three different required overall yields to get from the bond, given the changing levels of risk. After explaining the theory of present valuing the different fixed cashflows, we then use an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the three different bond prices. The lecture finishes with an Excel chart which displays the relationships between coupon rate, flat yield, and yield to maturity, as well as highlighting the most important concept in bond trading; when required interest rates go up, bond prices go down, and when required interest rates go down, bond prices go up. For those who wish to know how to calculate a yield to maturity given a market bond price, see the next lecture. Previous: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-tN32FU3D_k Next: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHR_GSEisRs For financial education from London to Singapore and beyond, please contact MithrilMoney via the following website: http://mithrilmoney.com/ This MithrilMoney lecture was delivered by Andy Duncan, CQF. Please read our disclaimer: http://mithrilmoney.com/disclaimer/
Views: 52265 MithrilMoney
FIN 401 - WACC (Market Value of Debt) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 21933 AllThingsMathematics
Flotation Cost - Bonds
 
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Flotation Cost - Bonds
Views: 10762 Engineer Clearly
Bond Pricing, Valuation, Formulas, and Functions in Excel
 
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Premium Course: https://www.teachexcel.com/premium-courses/68/idiot-proof-forms-in-excel?src=youtube Excel Forum: https://www.teachexcel.com/talk/microsoft-office?src=yt Excel Tutorials: https://www.teachexcel.com/src=yt This tutorial will show you how to calculate bond pricing and valuation in excel. This teaches you how to do so through using the NPER() PMT() FV() RATE() and PV() functions and formulas in excel. To follow along with this tutorial and download the spreadsheet used and or to get free excel macros, keyboard shortcuts, and forums, go to: http://www.TeachMsOffice.com
Views: 187823 TeachExcel
Equity vs. debt | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Debt vs. Equity. Market Capitalization, Asset Value, and Enterprise Value. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/more-on-ipos?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 372264 Khan Academy
Cost of Capital and Cost of Equity | Business Finance
 
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http://goo.gl/qQjWG8 for more free video tutorials covering Business Finance. This video explains two important concepts of business finance- cost of capital & cost of equity. First part of the video discusses on cost of capital drawing an example of a firm in terms of debt and equity. The cost of capital primarily depends upon the use of funds not the source. Next, the video briefly discusses on cost of equity referring the returns that investors holding shares in a firm require subsequent to an explanation on SML approach and dividend growth model. Moving on the video also asks to calculate the cost of equity for an example of extremely prices shares. Step by step calculation has shown and ways to find out some important parameters are demonstrated visibly. Good understanding on cost of capital; cost of equity & there in between relationship as well as having knowledge on different methods of calculation is imperative to become an expert on today’s business finance and accountancy.
Views: 141436 Spoon Feed Me
Cost of Debt
 
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Views: 35734 MVN University
FIN 401 - WACC (Cost of Equity) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 29105 AllThingsMathematics
8. Value a Bond and Calculate Yield to Maturity (YTM)
 
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Download Preston's 1 page checklist for finding great stock picks: http://buffettsbooks.com/checklist Preston Pysh is the #1 selling Amazon author of two books on Warren Buffett. The books can be found at the following location: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0982967624/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0982967624&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=EOHYVY7DPUCW3WD4 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1939370159/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1939370159&linkCode=as2&tag=pypull-20&linkId=XRE5CA2QJ3I2OWSW In this lesson, we began to understand the important terms that truly value a bond. Since most investors will never hold a bond throughout the entire term, understanding how to value the asset becomes very important. As we get into the second course of this website, a thorough understanding of these terms is needed. So, be sure to learn it now and not jump ahead. We learned that there are two ways to look at the value of a bond, simple interest and compound interest. As an intelligent investor, you'll really want to focus on understanding compound interest. The term that was really important to understand in this lesson was yield to maturity. This term was really important because it accounted for almost every variable we could consider when determining the true value (or intrinsic value) of the bond. Yield to Maturity estimates the total amount of money you will earn over the entire life of the bond, but it actually accounts for all coupons, interest-on-interest, and gains or losses you'll sustain from the difference between the price you pay and the par value.
Views: 386777 Preston Pysh
Bond Valuation part 1
 
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Views: 136253 Rahul Malkan
Introduction to present value | Interest and debt | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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A choice between money now and money later. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/present-value-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/time-value-of-money?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If you gladly pay for a hamburger on Tuesday for a hamburger today, is it equivalent to paying for it today? A reasonable argument can be made that most everything in finance really boils down to "present value". So pay attention to this tutorial. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 783563 Khan Academy
Understanding Debt vs. Equity Financing with Bond Street
 
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Sign up for Bond Street's entire class on Skillshare! http://skl.sh/YT-Bond-Street-II David Haber is co-founder and the CEO of Bond Street, a startup transforming small business lending through technology, data and design. Your small business is poised for major growth — but how will you get there? In this 50-minute class, Bond Street CEO David Haber will explain how you as a creative entrepreneur can take advantage of debt financing to grow your small business. Subscribe to Skillshare’s Youtube Channel: http://skl.sh/yt-subscribe Check out all of Skillshare’s classes: http://skl.sh/youtube Like Skillshare on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skillshare Follow Skillshare on Twitter: https://twitter.com/skillshare Follow Skillshare on Instagram: http://instagram.com/Skillshare
Views: 16782 Skillshare
Debt vs. Equity Analysis: How to Advise Companies on Financing
 
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In this tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze Debt vs. Equity financing options for a company, evaluate the credit stats and ratios in different operational cases, and make a recommendation based on both qualitative and quantitative factors. http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 0:50 The Short, Simple Answer 3:54 The Longer Answer – Central Japan Railway Example 12:31 Recap and Summary If you have an upcoming case study where you have to analyze a company's financial statements and recommend Debt or Equity, how should you do it? SHORT ANSWER: All else being equal, companies want the cheapest possible financing. Since Debt is almost always cheaper than Equity, Debt is almost always the answer. Debt is cheaper than Equity because interest paid on Debt is tax-deductible, and lenders' expected returns are lower than those of equity investors (shareholders). The risk and potential returns of Debt are both lower. But there are also constraints and limitations on Debt – the company might not be able to exceed a certain Debt / EBITDA, or it might have to keep its EBITDA / Interest above a certain level. So, you have to test these constraints first and see how much Debt a company can raise, or if it has to use Equity or a mix of Debt and Equity. The Step-by-Step Process Step 1: Create different operational scenarios for the company – these can be simple, such as lower revenue growth and margins in the Downside case. Step 2: "Stress test" the company and see if it can meet the required credit stats, ratios, and other requirements in the Downside cases. Step 3: If not, try alternative Debt structures (e.g., no principal repayments but higher interest rates) and see if they work. Step 4: If not, consider using Equity for some or all of the company's financing needs. Real-Life Example – Central Japan Railway The company needs to raise ¥1.6 trillion ($16 billion USD) of capital to finance a new railroad line. Option #1: Additional Equity funding (would represent 43% of its current Market Cap). Option #2: Term Loans with 10-year maturities, 5% amortization, ~4% interest, 50% cash flow sweep, and maintenance covenants. Option #3: Subordinated Notes with 10-year maturities, no amortization, ~8% interest rates, no early repayments, and only a Debt Service Coverage Ratio (DSCR) covenant. We start by evaluating the Term Loans since they're the cheapest form of financing. Even in the Base Case, it would be almost impossible for the company to comply with the minimum DSCR covenant, and it looks far worse in the Downside cases Next, we try the Subordinated Notes instead – the lack of principal repayment will make it easier for the company to comply with the DSCR. The DSCR numbers are better, but there are still issues in the Downside and Extreme Downside cases. So, we decide to try some amount of Equity as well. We start with 25% or 50% Equity, which we can simulate by setting the EBITDA multiple for Debt to 1.5x or 1.0x instead. The DSCR compliance is much better in these scenarios, but we still run into problems in Year 4. Overall, though, 50% Subordinated Notes / 50% Equity is better if we strongly believe in the Extreme Downside case; 75% / 25% is better if the normal Downside case is more plausible. Qualitative factors also support our conclusions. For example, the company has extremely high EBITDA margins, low revenue growth, and stable cash flows due to its near-monopoly in the center of Japan, so it's an ideal candidate for Debt. Also, there's limited downside risk in the next 5-10 years; population decline in Japan is more of a concern over the next several decades. RESOURCES: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Debt-vs-Equity-Analysis-Slides.pdf
Cost of Redeemable Debentures - Financial Management - A Complete Study
 
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join my Whatsapp Broadcast / Group to receive daily lectures on similar topics through this Whatsapp direct link https://wa.me/917736022001 by simply messaging YOUTUBE LECTURES If you wish to learn more about above topic ,check this Online course Financial Management A Complete Study for CA/CMA/CS/CFA/ACCA and here is the: Enrollment Link For Students Outside India: https://bit.ly/2D2QE0I Enrollment Link For Students From India: https://bit.ly/2WwImFW Check our other Comprehensive courses in Finance /Accounts / Costing / Credit Analysis / Financial Management / Statistics / Banking / Auditing, etc. @ lowest ever price in the market: I) ACCOUNTING COURSES: a) Accounting Basics A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2Wy4ZtE b) Advanced Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FHR1zs c ) Accounting Standards A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FKuuSM d) Consolidated Financial Statement https://bit.ly/2TCijuY e) Company Valuation https://bit.ly/2CMtqff f) MBA Accounting and Finance for Managers https://bit.ly/2uAczrG g) Accounting for CA Inter Paper 1 (Module 1) https://bit.ly/2EH2Czx h) Accounting for Employees Stock Ownership Plan (with Co-Instructor Anu Sebastian) https://bit.ly/2CIHDtE i) How to prepare Financial Statements for Indian Companies (with Co-Instructor Anu Sebastian) https://bit.ly/2FAdTjq II) BANKING COURSES: a) Accounting and Finance for Bankers https://bit.ly/2YxfGyk b) Accounting, Finance and Banking A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FKcd89 c) Banking PO Exams Practice Test Series Part 1 (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2HPyWBY d) NPA Management - A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2OfpZCl III) COSTING COURSES: a) Cost Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2YwSRe1 b) Management Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2CHTrMT IV) CREDIT ANALYSIS COURSES: a) Banking Credit Analysis Process (for Bankers) https://bit.ly/2TbmAoO b) How to Carry out Term Loan Appraisal & Assessment as Banker https://bit.ly/2Uedjhh c) How to Carry out Financial Analysis as Banker https://bit.ly/2FHTdaa d) Credit Policy, Products Delivery, Appraisal, Risk & Rating https://bit.ly/2DxhsqR e) Export Finance, Priority Sector Lending and Retail Loan https://bit.ly/2RVWjzj V) DIRECT TAXATION COURSES: a) Direct Taxation in India https://bit.ly/2JMPYSZ VI) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSES: a) Financial Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2WwImFW b) Advanced Financial Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2Yw8n9U c) Financial Management for CA Inter Exams https://bit.ly/2U4CerB d) CFA Corporate Finance Level 1 https://bit.ly/2TI61RU e) CFA Corporate Finance Level 2 https://bit.ly/2FFnnKh VII) GST COURSES: a) Basics of GST in India https://bit.ly/2uHn2BL VIII) AUDITING COURSES: a) Basics of Auditing https://bit.ly/2Y5dVYO IX) TAMIL COURSES ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSES: a) Accounting Basics in Tamil https://bit.ly/2TIWqhG b) Financial Management in Tamil https://bit.ly/2HioBOD X) STATISTICS COURSES: a) Basics of Statistics https://bit.ly/2FIB8Jc XI) For Competitive Exam: a) Reasoning ability for IBPS PO Mains Exams https://bit.ly/2GLvqaA b) Master Squares and Cubes: Excel in Competitive Examination (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2YyG7U5 c) Simplification Techniques and Tricks for Competitive Examinations (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2MrQIe9 d) General Awareness for IBPS-PO Mains Exam(with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2V4cZ4O e) General knowledge for IBPS- PO mains Exam(with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2SPtftO XII) MARKETING: a) Learn Advertising through Real Life Cases https://bit.ly/2FyKbLw b) Basics of AD-Message & Product Classification https://bit.ly/2FHTolU XIII) BUSINESS : a) Basics of Economics a Complete Study https://bit.ly/2TD9LnH b) Basics of Forex Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2IT1Vq2 c) Basics of Commerce A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2UlJn60 d) Basics of Indian Companies Act 2013 https://bit.ly/2FyGXHW XIIII) BASICS OF BUSINESS : a) Finance for Non Finance Executives https://bit.ly/2CLem1A Install our android app CARAJACLASSES to view lectures direct in your mobile - https://bit.ly/2S1oPM6
Views: 12565 CARAJACLASSES
What If The US Paid Off Its Debt?
 
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The first 1,000 people to sign up to Skillshare will get their first 2 months for free: https://skl.sh/infographics34 What would happen to the US if it paid off its debt? SUBSCRIBE TO US -► http://bit.ly/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- WEBSITE (SUGGEST A TOPIC): http://theinfographicsshow.com SUPPORT US: Patreon.......► https://www.patreon.com/theinfographicsshow SOCIAL: Twitter........► https://twitter.com/TheInfoShow Subreddit...► http://reddit.com/r/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources for this episode: https://pastebin.com/RdL3z9Xt
Views: 3671858 The Infographics Show
What is a Bond | by Wall Street Survivor
 
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What is a bond? Learn more at: https://www.wallstreetsurvivor.com A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to a corporate entity or government. The funds are borrowed for a defined period of time at either a variable or fixed interest rate. If you want a guaranteed money-maker, bonds are a much safer option than most. There are many times of bonds, however, and each type has a different risk level. Unlike stocks, which are equity instruments, bonds are debt instruments. When bonds are first issued by the company, the investor/lender typically gives the company $1,000 and the company promises to pay the investor/lender a certain interest rate every year (called the Coupon Rate), AND, repay the $1,000 loan when the bond matures (called the Maturity Date). For example, GE could issue a 30 year bond with a 5% coupon. The investor/lender gives GE $1,000 and every year the lender receives $50 from GE, and at the end of 30 years the investor/ lender gets his $1,000 back. Bonds di er from stocks in that they have a stated earnings rate and will provide a regular cash flow, in the form of the coupon payments to the bondholders. This cash flow contributes to the value and price of the bond and affects the true yield (earnings rate) bondholders receive. There are no such promises associated with common stock ownership. After a bond has been issued directly by the company, the bond then trades on the exchanges. As supply and demand forces start to take effect the price of the bond changes from its initial $1,000 face value. On the date the GE bond was issued, a 5% return was acceptable given the risk of GE. But if interest rates go up and that 5% return becomes unacceptable, the price of the GE bond will drop below $1,000 so that the effective yield will be higher than the 5% Coupon Rate. Conversely, if interest rates in general go down, then that 5% GE Coupon Rate starts looking attractive and investors will bid the price of the bond back above $1,000. When a bond trades above its face value it is said to be trading at a premium; when a bond trades below its face value it is said to be trading at a discount. Understanding the difference between your coupon payments and the true yield of a bond is critical if you ever trade bonds. Confused? Don't worry check out the video and head over to http://courses.wallstreetsurvivor.com/invest-smarter/
Views: 139511 Wall Street Survivor
Book Value vs Market Value vs Face Value of Bonds: How to Keep Them Straight
 
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You’ll learn about the book value vs market value vs face value of bonds in this tutorial, and you’ll understand how to calculate and project them in financial models. https://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Resources: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Book-Value-vs-Face-Value-Slides.pdf https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Book-Value-vs-Face-Value.xlsx Table of Contents: 3:06 Excel Examples 11:04 Combined Example 14:46 Recap and Summary SHORT ANSWER: Face Value is the amount of Debt that a company issues, pays interest on, and must repay upon maturity. It is affected ONLY by Debt issuances, principal repayments, and Accrued or “Paid-in-Kind” (PIK) Interest. Book Value is the Debt that shows up on a company’s Balance Sheet under Liabilities & Equity, but it is NOT necessarily the amount it pays Interest on or what it must eventually repay. It’s affected by everything above (issuances, repayments, and accrued interest), plus Issuance Fees, any Discount or Premium when the bond is first issued, and the amortization of both those items. Market Value is what someone else would pay to buy the company’s Debt on the secondary market if it trades like that. It’s affected by interest payments, market interest rates on similar Debt, and future repayment upon maturity. In practice, the bond’s coupon rate vs market rates, as well as the credit default risk of the issuer, make the biggest impact. EXCEL EXAMPLES: Toro is spending a lot and must issue additional Debt to fund operations in several years. The Face Value of Debt goes up when new Debt is issued and down when there’s a repayment or maturity. The Book Value of Debt also changes based on these, but we also must deduct the 2% financing fee on new issuances and add the amortization of these financing fees over 10 years. We don’t know enough to determine the Market Value since it depends on current market rates vs the 6.1% coupon rate the company is currently paying. In another example, Atlassian has issued a Convertible Bond that matures in 5 years, if it’s not converted into Equity before then. Convertible Bonds are often separated into Equity and Debt components to reflect their dual nature, and the Book Value here equals the Face Value minus the Unamortized Issuance Fees minus the Debt Discount, which represents the difference in value between a traditional, non-convertible bond with a higher interest rate and the much-lower-rate convertible bond. The Face Value here never changes until the end because there are no additional issuances, there’s no accrued interest, and there’s only the single maturity at the very end. Cash Interest never changes since it’s always based on this constant Face Value and a constant interest rate. The Book Value keeps increasing as the Debt Discount is amortized over time and as the Issuance Fees are also amortized, but it finally reaches $0 at the same time as the Face Value. We don’t know enough to determine the Market Value, as we’d need to know the prevailing market interest rates on similar bonds and Atlassian’s default risk. ONE EXAMPLE TO RULE THEM ALL: Assume that a company issues a $1,000 10-year bond at a 5.00% coupon rate vs prevailing market rates of 6.35% on similar bonds. There are no principal repayments, and the interest is 100% Cash. There is a 2% issuance fee. Due to the below-market rate, the bond is issued at a $100 Discount. The Face Value is $1,000 initially, and it never changes until maturity. The Cash Interest is 5% * $1,000 = $50 per year until maturity. The initial Book Value is the $1,000 Face Value – $100 Discount – $20 Issuance Fee = $880. The Book Value will change according to the amortization of the Discount and the amortization of the Issuance Fees each year. Book Value, Year 1: $880 + $100 / 10 + $20 / 10 = $892 Book Value, Year 2: $892 + $100 / 10 + $20 / 10 = $904 The Market Value is initially the $1,000 Face Value minus the $100 Discount (verify with the PRICE function in Excel), so $900. We don’t know exactly how it will change over time because we don’t know future interest rates, but if rates go up, the Market Value will go down, and if credit default risk goes up, the Market Value will also go down (and vice versa for both of these). Does Book Value vs Market Value vs Face Value for Bonds Matter? In most cases, these distinctions don’t make a huge difference. If you’re under time pressure, you can simplify all this and include only Issuances and Repayments to project Debt. But interview questions on these topics could still come up, and if a company has a Convertible Bond or a normal bond issued at a big discount or premium, the Book Value vs Face Value distinction matters since interest is based on Face Value.
Difference between Debt and Equity
 
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join my Whatsapp Broadcast / Group to receive daily lectures on similar topics through this Whatsapp direct link https://wa.me/917736022001 by simply messaging YOUTUBE LECTURES If you wish to learn more about above topic ,check this Online course Financial Management A Complete Study for CA/CMA/CS/CFA/ACCA and here is the: Enrollment Link For Students Outside India: https://bit.ly/2D2QE0I Enrollment Link For Students From India: https://bit.ly/2WwImFW Check our other Comprehensive courses in Finance /Accounts / Costing / Credit Analysis / Financial Management / Statistics / Banking / Auditing, etc. @ lowest ever price in the market: I) ACCOUNTING COURSES: a) Accounting Basics A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2Wy4ZtE b) Advanced Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FHR1zs c ) Accounting Standards A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FKuuSM d) Consolidated Financial Statement https://bit.ly/2TCijuY e) Company Valuation https://bit.ly/2CMtqff f) MBA Accounting and Finance for Managers https://bit.ly/2uAczrG g) Accounting for CA Inter Paper 1 (Module 1) https://bit.ly/2EH2Czx h) Accounting for Employees Stock Ownership Plan (with Co-Instructor Anu Sebastian) https://bit.ly/2CIHDtE i) How to prepare Financial Statements for Indian Companies (with Co-Instructor Anu Sebastian) https://bit.ly/2FAdTjq II) BANKING COURSES: a) Accounting and Finance for Bankers https://bit.ly/2YxfGyk b) Accounting, Finance and Banking A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2FKcd89 c) Banking PO Exams Practice Test Series Part 1 (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2HPyWBY d) NPA Management - A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2OfpZCl III) COSTING COURSES: a) Cost Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2YwSRe1 b) Management Accounting A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2CHTrMT IV) CREDIT ANALYSIS COURSES: a) Banking Credit Analysis Process (for Bankers) https://bit.ly/2TbmAoO b) How to Carry out Term Loan Appraisal & Assessment as Banker https://bit.ly/2Uedjhh c) How to Carry out Financial Analysis as Banker https://bit.ly/2FHTdaa d) Credit Policy, Products Delivery, Appraisal, Risk & Rating https://bit.ly/2DxhsqR e) Export Finance, Priority Sector Lending and Retail Loan https://bit.ly/2RVWjzj V) DIRECT TAXATION COURSES: a) Direct Taxation in India https://bit.ly/2JMPYSZ VI) FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSES: a) Financial Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2WwImFW b) Advanced Financial Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2Yw8n9U c) Financial Management for CA Inter Exams https://bit.ly/2U4CerB d) CFA Corporate Finance Level 1 https://bit.ly/2TI61RU e) CFA Corporate Finance Level 2 https://bit.ly/2FFnnKh VII) GST COURSES: a) Basics of GST in India https://bit.ly/2uHn2BL VIII) AUDITING COURSES: a) Basics of Auditing https://bit.ly/2Y5dVYO IX) TAMIL COURSES ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT COURSES: a) Accounting Basics in Tamil https://bit.ly/2TIWqhG b) Financial Management in Tamil https://bit.ly/2HioBOD X) STATISTICS COURSES: a) Basics of Statistics https://bit.ly/2FIB8Jc XI) For Competitive Exam: a) Reasoning ability for IBPS PO Mains Exams https://bit.ly/2GLvqaA b) Master Squares and Cubes: Excel in Competitive Examination (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2YyG7U5 c) Simplification Techniques and Tricks for Competitive Examinations (with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2MrQIe9 d) General Awareness for IBPS-PO Mains Exam(with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2V4cZ4O e) General knowledge for IBPS- PO mains Exam(with Co-Instructor Sandeep Kumar) https://bit.ly/2SPtftO XII) MARKETING: a) Learn Advertising through Real Life Cases https://bit.ly/2FyKbLw b) Basics of AD-Message & Product Classification https://bit.ly/2FHTolU XIII) BUSINESS : a) Basics of Economics a Complete Study https://bit.ly/2TD9LnH b) Basics of Forex Management A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2IT1Vq2 c) Basics of Commerce A Complete Study https://bit.ly/2UlJn60 d) Basics of Indian Companies Act 2013 https://bit.ly/2FyGXHW XIIII) BASICS OF BUSINESS : a) Finance for Non Finance Executives https://bit.ly/2CLem1A Install our android app CARAJACLASSES to view lectures direct in your mobile - https://bit.ly/2S1oPM6
Views: 118895 CARAJACLASSES
What Would Happen If USA Stopped Paying Its Debt?
 
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What would happen in the world and in United States if USA defaulted on it's debt? SUBSCRIBE TO US -► http://bit.ly/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- WEBSITE (SUGGEST A TOPIC): http://theinfographicsshow.com SUPPORT US: Patreon.......► https://www.patreon.com/theinfographicsshow CHAT WITH ME: DISCORD.....►https://discord.gg/theinfographicsshow SOCIAL: Twitter........► https://twitter.com/TheInfoShow Subreddit...► http://reddit.com/r/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources for this episode: https://pastebin.com/gPeUjWaj Some Images used under license from Shutterstock.com
Views: 1910339 The Infographics Show
Investing For Beginners: My Millionaire Investment Strategy For 2019
 
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Here’s my exact investment strategy for 2019, and precisely where I’ll be investing my money - enjoy! Add me on Instagram: GPStephan Get the Merch Here: http://www.GrahamStephanStore.com GET $50 OFF FOR A LIMITED TIME WITH COUPON CODE: THANKYOU50 The Real Estate Agent Academy: Learn how to start and grow your career as a Real Estate Agent to a Six-Figure Income, how to best build your network of clients, expand into luxury markets, and the exact steps I’ve used to grow my business from $0 to over $125 million in sales: https://goo.gl/UFpi4c Join the private Real Estate Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/therealestatemillionairemastermind/ When it comes to investing, I ALWAYS think to myself: where can I get the MOST opportunity, long term. What is going to give me the highest return, with the LEAST amount of risk? And also, how much risk do I need to take, how hard do I need to work for that, and what’s going to get me the best value? Here’s my thoughts when it comes to what I want to do in 2019: First, I’m planning to use about 60% of my income this year to diversify and strengthen my stock market portfolio. This is something I pretty much see as a lower risk, lower time commitment, and yes…lower return investment. I think a more beefed-up well balanced portfolio would insulate me from anything outside my control and give me a little more liquidity, in the event I ever needed it. This move is really about spreading out my risk and also taking a more passive approach when it comes to investing this year - just for the sake of rounding out my investments. So when it comes to doing this, because everyone just wants specific information, I’ll likely be investing a significant portion of my income between three funds - this strategy is also known as the “Three Fund Portfolio”: First, I’ll be investing about 70% in Vanguard’s Total Stock Market Index - VTSAX. Second, I’ll throw about 20% in Vanguard’s International Stock Market Index - VTIAX. Lastly, I’ll just throw 10% remaining in the Vanguard Bond Market - VBTLX. This strategy is more about investing in something completely hands off, zero work, just set it and forget about it…and this way, I’ll have the peace of mind knowing that I’m investing in something I consider 100% passive income. Now my SECOND investment will be back to real estate…in previous years, this was my priority…but this year, it’s taking the back seat, but it’ll be a fun one. About 30% of my income this year will be saved up, cash, in high interest savings accounts earning about 2.2% or so. I’ve been somewhat casually looking at real estate to buy this year, but I just can’t find anything that’s worth getting… And when I look at real estate, I look for VALUE…I buy places I’m 100% sure I can make money on…and from the properties I’ve seen so far, I just can’t find anything that’s a sure thing. So instead, here’s where I’m starting to realize there’s a lot of opportunity: DEVELOPMENT. This is where my cash is going to come in handy. For instance, I have one unit where once the tenant moves out, I can spend about $60,000 fixing it up, and I’d be able to make an extra $1100 per month in rent. This is over a 20% CASH RETURN ON MY MONEY. Also, like I mentioned a few months ago when I did the house tour of the new place I just bought, I’d eventually like to spend about $200,000 and create what’s called an ADU on the property - this is an Accessory Dwelling Unit, and this is just a fancy term for a guest house. Basically, I can build a $200,000 guest house and rent that out for about $1600 per month. That works out to be nearly a 10% cash return on my money - pretty much risk free, especially if I paid for this in cash. So right there, with about $260,000 spent…I can make a guaranteed $2700 per month EXTRA with no additional debt, and no risk. To me, that’s the IDEAL scenario, and I can’t imagine any other investment I could possibly make right now that would give me those numbers. So between those, that’s pretty much where most of my money is going this year. Balanced Index funds and save up cash for some development to increase existing cashflow…I see this as lower risk, more diversification, while still increasing value at the same time. Hope that makes sense - this move is all about more diversification, spreading out my money a little more, focusing on investments that might be slightly more passive, and trying to be a little less heavy in real estate - just because that would be the smart thing ANY investor should do. For business or one-on-one real estate investing/real estate agent consulting inquiries, you can reach me at [email protected] My ENTIRE Camera and Recording Equipment: https://www.amazon.com/shop/grahamstephan?listId=2TNWZ7RP1P1EB Favorite Credit Cards: Chase Ink 100k Bonus Point Offer - https://www.referyourchasecard.com/21/ZVSGGIXM8U American Express Platinum - http://refer.amex.us/GRAHASOxHd?XLINK=MYCP
Views: 112785 Graham Stephan
FIN 401- Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) Overview - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 16219 AllThingsMathematics
Bonds vs. stocks | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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The difference between a bond and a stock. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/shorting-stock/v/basic-shorting?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/stocks-intro-tutorial/v/what-it-means-to-buy-a-company-s-stock?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Many people own stocks, but, unfortunately, most of them don't really understand what they own. This tutorial will keep you from being one of those people (not keep you from owning stock, but keep you from being ignorant about your investments). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 917486 Khan Academy
Understanding Long Term Debt
 
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http://www.MDTSeminar.com Long-term debt consists of loans and financial obligations lasting over one year. Long-term debt for a company would include any financing or leasing obligations that are to come due in a greater than 12-month period. Long-term debt also applies to governments: nations can also have long-term debt. Financial and leasing obligations, also called long-term liabilities, or fixed liabilities, would include company bond issues or long-term leases that have been capitalized on a firm's balance sheet. Often, a portion of these long-term liabilities must be paid within the year; these are categorized as current liabilities, and are also documented on the balance sheet. The balance sheet can be used to track the company's debt and profitability. On a balance sheet, the company's debts are categorized as either financial liabilities or operating liabilities. Financial liabilities refer to debts owed to investors or stockholders; these include bonds and notes payable. Operating liabilities refer to the leases or unsettled payments incurred in order to maintain facilities and services for the company. These include everything from rented building spaces and equipment to employee pension plans. For more on how a company uses its debt, see Financial Statements: Long-Term Liabilities. A company takes on long-term debt in order to acquire immediate capital. For example, startup ventures require substantial funds to get off the ground and pay for basic expenses, such as research expenses, Insurance, License and Permit Fees, Equipment and Supplies and Advertising and Promotion. All businesses need to generate income, and long-term debt is an effective way to get immediate funds to finance and operations. Since debt sums tend to be large, these loans take many years to pay off. Companies with too much long-term debt will find it hard to pay off these debts and continue to thrive, as much of their capital is devoted to interest payments and it can be difficult to allocate money to other areas. A company can determine whether it has accrued too much long-term debt by examining its debt to equity ratio. A high debt to equity ratio means the company is funding most of its ventures with debt. If this ratio is too high, the company is at risk of bankruptcy if it becomes unable to finance its debt due to decreased income or cash flow problems. A high debt to equity ratio also tends to put a company at a disadvantage against its competitors who may have more cash. Many industries discourage companies from taking on too much long-term debt in order to reduce the risks and costs closely associated with unstable forms of income, and they even pass regulations that restrict the amount of long-term debt a company can acquire. A low debt to equity ratio is a sign that the company is growing or thriving, as it is no longer relying on its debt and is making payments to lower it. It consequently has more leverage with other companies and a better position in the current financial environment. However, the company must also compare its ratio to those of its competitors, as this context helps determines economic leverage.
Deficits & Debts: Crash Course Economics #9
 
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What is debt? What is a deficit? And do these things have different outcomes for individuals and nations? Adriene and Jacob answer all these questions and more on this week's Crash Course Econ. Deficit and debt are easy to misunderstand, but luckily, they're also pretty easy to understand. This week we'll explain what deficit and debt are, and talk about what the sources of deficit and debt are for the US Government. Also, we'll take a very special trip to Cliffordonia to try and understand these concepts and get a look at what a colonial-era space program might have looked like. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark , Elliot Beter, Moritz Schmidt, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Jacob Ash, Jessica Wode, Today I Found Out, Christy Huddleston, James Craver, Chris Peters, SR Foxley, Steve Marshall, Simun Niclasen, Eric Kitchen, Robert Kunz, Avi Yashchin, Jason A Saslow, Jan Schmid, Daniel Baulig, Christian , Anna-Ester Volozh Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 678729 CrashCourse
Bonds & Debentures - Explained
 
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Bonds and Debentures are explained in hindi. Although a bond and a debenture work more or less the same way, there are few subtle differences. In this bonds vs debentures video, we will understand these differences on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. Bond market can give you fixed income which has much lesser risk as compared to share market. You can invest in corporate bonds & debentures, government bonds and Tax Saving Bonds. There are various types of bonds - convertible & non convertible debentures, zero coupon bonds, callable bonds, secured & unsecured debentures, redeemable a& irredeemable bonds etc. Related Videos: Shares vs Debentures (Bonds) - https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Types of Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/5YN_Uo7stms How to Invest in Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/hC9OsIzAoEk हिंदी में Bonds and Debentures के बीच तुलना। हालांकि एक bond और debenture एक ही तरह से कम या ज्यादा काम करते हैं, कुछ subtle differences हैं। इस bonds vs debentures वीडियो में, हम security, convertibility, risk etc के आधार पर इन differences को समझेंगे। Share this video: https://youtu.be/BdMg5RmMj_0 Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Finance Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g To access more learning resources on finance, check out www.assetyogi.com In this video, we have explained: What is equity financing? What is debt financing? What is an example of debt financing? What is the difference between a debenture and a bond? What are debentures in simple terms? What are bonds? What are the similarities between bonds and debentures? How do bonds work? What are debenture holders? How does a debenture work? If there is a requirement of funds in any company then there are two options. First one is equity financing and the other one is debt financing. Equity financing is a risk capital in which company dilute its shareholding. On the other hand, if the company doesn't want to dilute its shareholding then company raises debt financing. So in this video, we will understand the differences between bonds and debentures on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. A bond is a financial instrument which highlights the debt taken of the issuing body towards the holders. A debenture is an instrument used for raising long term finances. Make sure to like and share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Bonds vs Debentures"
Views: 36060 Asset Yogi
Introduction to Debt and Equity Financing
 
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Help us learn more about your experience by completing this short survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RRKS8LZ Subscribe to Alanis Business Academy on YouTube for updates on the latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/alanisbusinessacademy?sub_confirmation=1 Finance is the function responsible for identifying the firm's best sources of funding as well as how best to use those funds. These funds allow firms to meet payroll obligations, repay long-term loans, pay taxes, and purchase equipment among other things. Although many different methods of financing exist, we classify them under two categories: debt financing and equity financing. To address why firms have two main sources of funding we have take a look at the accounting equation. The basic accounting equation states that assets equal liabilities plus owners' equity. This equation remains constant because firms look to debt, also known as liabilities, or investor money, also known as owners' equity, to run operations. Debt financing is long-term borrowing provided by non-owners, meaning individuals or other firms that do not have an ownership stake in the company. Debt financing commonly takes the form of taking out loans and selling corporate bonds. Using debt financing provides several benefits to firms. First, interest payments are tax deductible. Just like the interest on a mortgage loan is tax deductible for homeowners, firms can reduce their taxable income if they pay interest on loans. Although deduction does not entirely offset the interest payments it at least lessens the financial impact of raising money through debt financing. Another benefit to debt financing is that firm's utilizing this form of financing are not required to publicly disclose of their plans as a condition of funding. The allows firms to maintain some degree of secrecy so that competitors are not made away of their future plans. The last benefit of debt financing that we'll discuss is that it avoids what is referred to as the dilution of ownership. We'll talk more about the dilution of ownership when we discuss equity financing. Although debt financing certainly has its advantages, like all things, there are some negative sides to raising money through debt financing. The first disadvantage is that a firm that uses debt financing is committing to making fixed payments, which include interest. This decreases a firm's cash flow. Firms that rely heavily in debt financing can run into cash flow problems that can jeopardize their financial stability. The next disadvantage to debt financing is that loans may come with certain restrictions. These restrictions can include things like collateral, which require the firm to pledge an asset against the loan. If the firm defaults on payments then the issuer can seize the asset and sell it to recover their investment. Another restriction is a covenant. Covenants are stipulations or terms placed on the loan that the firm must adhere to as a condition of the loan. Covenants can include restrictions on additional funding as well as restrictions on paying dividends. Equity financing involves acquiring funds from owners, who are also known as shareholders. Equity financing commonly involves the issuance of common stock in public and secondary offerings or the use of retained earnings. A benefit of using equity financing is the flexibility that it provides over debt financing. Equity financing does not come with the same collateral and covenants that can be imposed with debt financing. Another benefit to equity financing also does not increase a firms risk of default like debt financing does. A firm that utilizes equity financing does not pay interest, and although many firm's pay dividends to their investors they are under no obligation to do so. The downside to equity financing is that it produces no tax benefits and dilutes the ownership of existing shareholders. Dilution of ownership means that existing shareholders percentage of ownership decreases as the firm decides to issue additional shares. For example, lets say that you own 50 shares in ABC Company and there are 200 shares outstanding. This means that you hold a 25 percent stake in ABC Company. With such a large percentage of ownership you certainly have the power to affect decision-making. In order to raise additional funding ABC Company decides to issue 200 additional shares. You still hold 50 shares in the company, but now there are 400 shares outstanding. Which means you now hold a 12.5 percent stake in the company. Thus your ownership has been diluted due to the issuance of additional shares. A prime example of the dilution of ownership occurred in in the mid-2000's when Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin had his ownership stake reduced by the issuance of additional shares.
FIN 300 - Agency Costs - Ryerson University
 
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http://allthingsmathematics.teachable.com/p/ryersonfin300 FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University ADMS 3530 - York University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 8822 AllThingsMathematics
Ch 14 - Watch the whole chapter!
 
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From a Firm's perspective, raising money for its operations by issuing stocks and bonds requires annual payments back to the stock and bond buyers. We call those costs to the Firm "cost of equity", "cost of preferred stock", and "cost of debt". Weighted Average Cost of Capital (WACC) is the weighted average of the three. A Firm's WACC helps determine what rate of return a new project needs to generate. In this chapter: * Calculation of WACC and its components: cost of equity, cost of preferred stock, cost of debt, and the weights of the three. * When can one use a Firm's WACC as the discount rate for a new investment project, and when can one not? * On top on the annual cost of raising equity / preferred stock / debt, there is also an immediate cost to the Firm of issuing these financial securities. In real life, a Firm hires a third party that helps it go through the issuing process and the sale of the financial securities to its investors. These immediate costs can be viewed as a fee that the Firm pays to this third party, and are called "flotation costs". * While Firm's WACC determines the required discount rate for any new project, flotation costs affect the projects' initial investment.
Views: 119 Teach me finance
Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11
 
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So, we've been putting off a kind of basic question here. What is money? What is currency? How are the two different. Well, not to give away too much, but money has a few basic functions. It acts as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and as a unit of account. Money isn't just bills and coins. It can be anything that meets these three criteria. In US prisons, apparently, pouches of Mackerel are currency. Yes, mackerel the fish. Paper and coins work as money because they're backed by the government, which is an advantage over mackerel. So, once you've got money, you need finance. We'll talk about borrowing, lending, interest, and stocks and bonds. Also, this episode features a giant zucchini, which Adriene grew in her garden. So that's cool. Special thanks to Dave Hunt for permission to use his PiPhone video. this guy really did make an artisanal smartphone! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eaiNsFhtI8 Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 756656 CrashCourse
China Sells $3 Billion of US Debt as Trade War Surges
 
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China has sold $3 billion in United States bonds. It’s the latest escalation in the trade war between the world’s largest two economies. RT America’s Dan Cohen reports. RT America’s Bart Chilton, host of Boom Bust joins Scottie Nell Hughes for analysis. Find RT America in your area: http://rt.com/where-to-watch/ Or watch us online: http://rt.com/on-air/rt-america-air/ Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/RTAmerica Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/RT_America
Views: 604080 RT America
FIN 401 - WACC (Cost of Preferred Equity) - Ryerson University
 
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LIST OF FIN401 VIDEOS ORGANIZED BY CHAPTER http://www.fin401.ca FIN300 FIN 300 CFIN300 CFIN 300 - Ryerson University FIN401 FIN 401 CFIN401 CFIN 401 - Ryerson University Key Words: MHF4U, Nelson, Advanced Functions, Mcgraw Hill, Grade 12, Toronto, Mississauga, Tutor, Math, Polynomial Functions, Division, Ontario, University, rick hansen secondary school, john fraser secondary school, applewood heights secondary school, greater toronto area, lorne park secondary school, clarkson secondary school, mpm1d, mpm2d, mcr3u, mcv4u, tutoring, university of waterloo, queens university, university of western, york university, university of toronto, finance, uoft, reciprocals, reciprocal of a function, library, bonds, stocks, npv, equity, balance sheet, income statement, liabilities, CCA, cca tax shield, capital cost allowance, finance, managerial finance, fin 300, fin300, fin 401, fin401, irr, profitability index,
Views: 13292 AllThingsMathematics
How to Calculate the Issue Price of a Bond (Semiannual Interest Payments)
 
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This video shows how to calculate the issue price of a bond that pays semiannual interest. The issue price is the sum of: (1) the present value of the face value of the bond, which is to be paid when the bond matures, and (2) the present value of the interest payments. Because the bond pays interest semiannually, the interest rate should be divided by two and the number of periods should be adjusted (e.g., if it is a 10-year bond, there would be 20 periods because interest is paid twice a year). The video provide formulas to calculate the present values and illustrates the computations using an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like Edspira on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira To sign up for the newsletter, visit http://Edspira.com/register-for-newsletter Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin
Views: 31068 Edspira
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 377486 Khan Academy
"European Debt Crisis" ECB's Draghi Says No Quantitative Limit on Bond Buys
 
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http://www.StockMarketFunding.com "European Debt Crisis" ECB's Draghi Says No Quantitative Limit on Bond Buys (VIDEO). Mario Draghi says he will do "whatever it takes" to save the euro. The ECB wants to help cut the borrowing costs of debt-burdened eurozone members by buying their bonds. Ahead of the announcement, the ECB kept its benchmark interest rate unchanged at 0.75%.Mr Draghi said the ECB would engage in outright monetary transactions, or OMTs, to address "severe distortions" in government bond markets based on "unfounded fears". He insisted that the ECB was "strictly within our mandate" of maintaining financial stability, but reiterated the need for governments to continue with their deficit reduction plans and labour market reforms.He added that the ECB's actions come in response to eurozone economic contraction in 2012, with continued weakness likely to continue into 2013. The ECB expects the eurozone economy to shrink by 0.4% in 2012 and grow by 0.5% in 2013, with inflation rising to 2.6%. OMTs will only be carried out in conjunction with European Financial Stability Facility or European Stability Mechanism programmes, he said. The maturities of the bonds being purchased would be between one and three years and there would be no limits on the size of bond purchases, he added.The ECB will ask the International Monetary Fund to help it monitor country compliance with its conditions. Please like, share, subscribe & comment! Subscribe to our channel for a daily videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=StockMarketFunding Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OnlineTradingPlatform Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/TradeEducation Find Us on Google +1 http://gplus.to/TradingStocks Join us on Linkedin http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Pro-Traders-1143227 Other Link Verified Trading Profits http://profit.ly/user/StockMarketFunding/trades Free Trial Signup http://onlinetradinginvesting.eventbrite.com Video RSS Feed http://feeds.feedburner.com/tradereducation Trading Community (Free to Join) http://www.DailyStockCharts.com Tags "live day trading" "stock market today" "stock market" "stock trading" "online trading" "swing trading" "day trading" "options trading" "live day trading stocks" "live day trading 2012" "Stock Option" "Stock Options" "Options Strategies" "Options Education" "Stock Market" "Technical Analysis" "Market Commentary" "Market Trend" "Online Stock Trading" "Trading Education" "Stock Chart" "Stock Market Analysis" "Trader Education" "Stock Trade" "Trading Stocks" "Stock Markets" "Stock Market News" "Financial News" "Live Stock Market" "Live Stock Trading" "Learn the Stock Market" "Stock Market Education" "stock trader" "day trading" "swing trading" option "options strategies" "price action trading" "candle stick" candlestick "chart patterns" "charting application" "day trader" "day trading" "Day trading software" equity stock stocks market markets "high frequency trading" investment strategy "Market Maker" "Market timing" "Market Trends" "stock market" "technical analysis" Trade Trader "trend line" volatility "trading strategy" ECB "European Debt Crisis"
Video No. 2: Bond Prices, Present Value, and Compound Interest
 
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Dan Thornton from D.L. Thornton Economics discusses the negative relationship between bond prices and interest rates, present value, and compound interest.
Views: 14705 Dan Thornton
Passive Income Dividends: Pay Your Bills with Monthly Dividend Cash
 
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How I created a monthly income stream from passive dividend investing. There is no investing strategy more popular than dividend investing and for good reason. Dividend stocks outperform the rest of the stock market and put cash in your pocket. Dividend investing is safer than other investing strategies and will help you reach your investing goals. The only problem with dividend stocks is that most companies only pay dividends four times a year. That makes it difficult to create a monthly stream of income from just dividends. In this investing tutorial, I show you how to create a source of passive income from just four dividend investments. You'll not only get constant cash flow every month but will benefit from price appreciation for double-digit returns. Stop chasing stocks and worrying about a stock market crash. Learn how to invest in dividend stocks. This dividend investing tutorial will not only explain how dividends work but will show you a dividend investing strategy that includes monthly cash flow and upside returns potential. Learn how to invest in dividend stocks for income and double-digit returns. Includes four picks for the best dividend stocks of 2018 and how to invest in all without losing hundreds in fees. Whether you need retirement dividends or just to grow your portfolio, don't miss this video! SUBSCRIBE to create the financial future you deserve with videos on beating debt, making more money and making your money work for you. https://peerfinance101.com/FreeMoneyVideos Join me every Monday through Wednesday for a new video and the financial future you deserve. Wednesday is our Q&A video so subscribe to the channel and get your question in at https://peerfinance101.com/ask/ Join the Facebook communities for each blog: Personal Finance - https://www.facebook.com/peerfinance101/ Investing - https://www.facebook.com/mystockmarketbasics/ Making Money - https://www.facebook.com/myworkfromhomemoney/ Do you Tweet? Join us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/peerfinance101 Joseph Hogue, CFA spent nearly a decade as an investment analyst for institutional firms and banks. He now helps people understand their financial lives through debt payoff strategies, investing and ways to save more money. He has appeared on Bloomberg and on sites like CNBC and Morningstar. He holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation and is a veteran of the Marine Corps.
Intro to the Bond Market
 
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Most borrowers borrow through banks. But established and reputable institutions can also borrow from a different intermediary: the bond market. That’s the topic of this video. We’ll discuss what a bond is, what it does, how it’s rated, and what those ratings ultimately mean. First, though: what’s a bond? It’s essentially an IOU. A bond details who owes what, and when debt repayment will be made. Unlike stocks, bond ownership doesn’t mean owning part of a firm. It simply means being owed a specific sum, which will be paid back at a promised time. Some bonds also entitle holders to “coupon payments,” which are regular installments paid out on a schedule. Now—what does a bond do? Like stocks, bonds help raise money. Companies and governments issue bonds to finance new ventures. The ROI from these ventures, can then be used to repay bond holders. Speaking of repayments, borrowing through the bond market may mean better terms than borrowing from banks. This is especially the case for highly-rated bonds. But what determines a bond’s rating? Bond ratings are issued by agencies like Standard and Poor’s. A rating reflects the default risk of the institution issuing a bond. “Default risk” is the risk that a bond issuer may be unable to make payments when they come due. The higher the issuer’s default risk, the lower the rating of a bond. A lower rating means lenders will demand higher interest before providing money. For lenders, higher ratings mean a safer investment. And for borrowers (the bond issuers), a higher rating means paying a lower interest on debt. That said, there are other nuances to the bond market—things like the “crowding out” effect, as well as the effect of collateral on a bond’s interest rate. These are things we’ll leave you to discover in the video. Happy learning! Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/1R1PL5x Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/29Q2f7d Next video: http://bit.ly/29WhXgC Office Hours video: http://bit.ly/29R04Ba Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/QZ06/
FRM: TI BA II+ to compute bond yield (YTM)
 
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Given four inputs (price, term/maturity, coupon rate, and face/par value), we can use the calculator's I/Y to find the bond's yield (yield to maturity). For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 140238 Bionic Turtle
How to pay off a 30 year home mortgage in 5-7 years
 
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SUMMARY: In the above video I reveal a powerful strategy that is practically available to all, but is known and fully understood by a very few. If one takes the time to learn and implement this method of eliminating debt, one may find themselves pleasantly surprised of how quickly their home mortgage, auto loans, student loans or business loans can be completely paid off. This strategy is known as Velocity Banking and in the video I will demonstrate how Velocity Banking can be used to pay off a 30 year home mortgage in just 5-7 years without sending double payments to the bank or changing one’s current level of income. RECAP OF THE VIDEO: I start off by creating a scenario of a financial situation by taking an average household net income in the United States combined with some of the basic monthly expenses: home mortgage, minimum payment on a credit card, car payment and living expenses which include groceries, utilities, gym membership… Once all expenses are identified and subtracted from the net monthly income it is important to understand the impact of cash flow, the difference between a loan and a line of credit, how the interest of a loan and a line of credit is calculated, and how monthly payments on a mortgage are dispersed between interest and principal paydown. To help demonstrate these differences I create tables and an amortization graph. As I go on to unveil the main differences I also identify the biggest reason why nowadays most homeowners are unable to payoff their home mortgages due to the unstrategic use of home refinancing. By this point having had identified the difference between a loan and a line of credit I can reveal the benefits of utilizing a line of credit to pay off a home mortgage in 5-7 years. This is where I get into the Velocity Banking strategy which incorporates an unaccustomed method of moving one’s entire monthly paycheck into a line of credit instead of the accustomed checkings and savings accounts. By adopting this method one can leverage a line of credit to free up cash flow, gain cash back rewards, build credit history and improve credit score, but the greatest leverage created is the thousands if not hundreds of thousands of dollars in interest savings. KARL'S MORTGAGE CALCULATOR APP: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/karls-mortgage-calculator/id1025852681?mt=8 Android version: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.drcalculator.android.mortgage ★☆★ SUBSCRIBE TO MY YOUTUBE CHANNEL FOR VIDEOS ABOUT REAL ESTATE AND BUSINESS ★☆★ ► Velocity Banking & Real Estate Investing Course - Please email me at [email protected] for more information. ★☆★ CONNECT WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA ★☆★ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/Laura-Pitko-1464576883611081/ INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/laura_pitko24/ DISCLAIMER: I (Laura Pitkute) am not a financial advisor, real estate broker, a licensed mortgage broker, not a certified financial planner, not a licensed attorney, and not a certified public accountant, therefore please consult with a competent professional prior to engaging in any financial strategies. Not everyone will experience 100% success rate by using this strategy as it requires a commitment to keep applying this strategy over time until the desired result is achieved. I (Laura Pitkute) do not promise or guarantee any specific outcomes and/or results from the use of this strategy.
Views: 3129301 Laura Pitko