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CAPITAL INVESTMENTS IN HINDI | Importance and Types | Project Planning & Evaluation | BBA/MBA | ppt
 
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#YouTubeTaughtMe PROJECT PLANNING AND EVALUATION IN HINDI - 1 This video consists of the following: 1. Meaning and Concept of Capital investments in hindi 2. Importance of Capital investments 3. Types of Capital Investments: i. Physical assets ii. Monetary assets iii. Intangible assets iv. Strategic investment v. Tactical investment vi. Mandatory investment vii. Replacement investment viii. Expansion investment ix. Diversification investment x. R&D investment xi. Miscellaneous investment IF ANYONE INTERESTED IN JOINING MY TEAM IN MAKING PPTs, HE/SHE CAN JOIN MY TEAM MY NUMBER IS 9716663769 (WhatsApp only). BEST REFERRED BOOK FOR PROJECT PLANNING AND EVALUATION (PRASANNA CHANDRA) : https://amzn.to/2M6Y8mk - Projects: Planning - Analysis by Prasanna Chandra (Author) TAGS FOR VIDEO: capital investment meaning in hindi capital investment importance capital investment importance and difficulties capital investment importance and difficulties ppt capital investment types capital investment and its types 3 types of capital investment projects 3 types of capital investment 4 types of capital investment capital investment capital investment decisions capital investment ppt capital investment pdf capital investment and capital budgeting capital investment meaning capital investment analysis capital investment analysis ppt a capital investment project a capital investment decision capital investment budget capital investment business capital investment definition capital investment decisions ppt capital investment decisions examples capital investment decision making ppt capital investment decisions making capital investment examples capital investment evaluation methods capital investment in hindi bba capital investment mba capital investment lecture on capital investment
Views: 5404 Sonu Singh - PPT wale
NPV - Net Present Value, IRR - Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period.
 
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Project management topic on Capital budgeting techniques - NPV - Net Present Value, IRR - Internal Rate of Return, Payback Period, Profitability Index or Benefit Cost Ratio.
Views: 482768 pmtycoon
Investment Appraisal - Calculating Net Present Value
 
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The basics of how to calculate present value and net present value are explained in this short revision video.
Views: 78311 tutor2u
Capital Budgeting Techniques (PB, ARR, NPV, PI & IRR) ~ Financial Management for B.Com/CA/CS/CMA
 
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Explained various capital budgeting techniques with the help of one single question which are : 1. Pay Back Method 2. Average Rate of Return Method 3. Net Present Value Method 4. Profitability Index Method 5. Internal Rate of Return Method Student can also watch the following lectures related with the Financial Management : 1. Capital Budgeting (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOaGNDmKpzo 2. How to calculate PVF, PVAF, CVF, CVAF values on calculator : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cUTDq6hpais 3. Present Value of Perpetuity : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVxvJ_JTiug 4. Time Value of Money (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeox8DLagHU 5. Cost of Capital (Cost of Debt, Preference Shares, Equity and Retained Earnings) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGN_IonxroE 6. Cash Budget (Introduction) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1Yx5bFOZfo 🔴 Connect on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ca.naresh.aggarwal 🔴 Download Assignments: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing 🔴 Connect with Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+CANareshAggarwal #CapitalBudgeting #FinancialManagement
Views: 425270 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
Investment Appraisal - How to Calculate ARR
 
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In this short revision video we explain how to calculate ARR (Average Rate of Return) - one of the three main methods of investment appraisal.
Views: 23963 tutor2u
capital investment appraisal
 
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calculations for payback, ARR, NPV and IRR NPV IRR Payback AAT Level 3 Costing Costing
Views: 531 Andrew Harrison
Capital Investment Models - Internal Rate of Return
 
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Calculating internal rate of return with examples using present value of annuity tables, Excel, and trial and error method with straight-line interpolation. PV annuity tables PV lump sum tables IRR
Capital Investment Models - Accounting Rate of Return
 
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Accounting rate of return or Accrual accounting rate of return Alternative method for calculating ARR or AARR Examples of using accounting rate of return
Making Capital Investment Decisions Part 1
 
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This video is part of a series of lectures that comprise an MBA level course in Corporate Finance. The lectures build on concepts and principals developed in previous lectures and, therefore, are best viewed in sequence. However, each lecture is divided into topics which can provide students (MBA and advanced undergraduates) with a helpful review of a specific topic. Persons preparing to take the CFA Exams will also find these lectures useful. The course consists of the following video lectures: 1. Investment Decisions and the Fundamentals of Value. 2. Financial Statements and Cash Flow (5 parts) 3. Discounted Cash Flow Valuation (6 parts) 4. Investment Decision Rules (5 parts) 5. Making Capital Investment Decisions (2 parts) 6. Valuation of Bonds (4 parts) 7. Stock Valuation (3 parts) 8. Lessons from Capital Market History (3 parts) 9. Risk and Return (3 parts) 10. CAPM (3 parts) 11. Risk and Capital Budgeting (3 parts) 12. Capital Budgeting Analysis (3 parts)
Views: 11608 shszewczyk
Capital Investment Analysis
 
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The Capital Investment Analysis program (formerly Feasibility Studies program) provides grant funding to local governments, First Nations bands and registered non-profits to help cover the cost of an advanced business case study that leads to a final investment decision for a major capital infrastructure project.
Capital Investment Appraisal methods ROI ARR PP Eng Arb Part I
 
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سلسلة أساليب تقييم الاستثمار في رأس المال by Hassan Elzaatari [email protected]
Views: 174 Hassan ELZaatari
Capital Investment Decisions  -- Payback Period
 
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In this video we discuss how to calculate the payback and discounted payback periods. We also discuss their uses and limitations.
Views: 187 Kirby Cundiff
Capital Budgeting and Investment Evaluation
 
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Promo video fo my course Capital Budgeting and Investment Evaluations on Udemy.org http://www.financialresearches.com/courses-3/
Views: 118 Giovanni Fasano
#1 Capital Budgeting (Introduction) - Financial Management for B.Com/M.Com/CA/CS/CWA
 
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#CapitalBudgeting #FinancialManagement Described the terms Initial Investment, Subsequent Cash Flows and Terminal Cash Flow followed by a practical question. Student can also watch the following lectures related with the Financial Management : 1. Capital Budgeting Techniques || PB, ARR, NPV, PI & IRR https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QXoFB4-MV_I 2. Present Value of Perpetuity : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gVxvJ_JTiug 3. Time Value of Money (Introduction) - Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oeox8DLagHU 4. Leverage Analysis (Introduction) Financial Management : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3l1iB_-xZBw 5. Cash Budget (Introduction) : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1Yx5bFOZfo Connect on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/ca.naresh.aggarwal Download Notes: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BzfDYffb228JNW9WdVJyQlQ2eHc?usp=sharing #FinancialManagement #CapitalBudgeting
Views: 188930 CA. Naresh Aggarwal
Investment Evaluation Criteria I- accounting rate of return (ARR) and payback period method (COM)
 
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Subject: Commerce Paper: Financial management Module: Investment Evaluation Criteria I- accounting rate of return (ARR) and payback period method (COM) Content Writer: Mr. Pankaj Choudhary
Views: 1021 Vidya-mitra
investment evaluation techniques
 
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Presently,Professor in Management, MVGR College of Engineering, Vizianagaram, Andhra Pradesh, India. To introduce Accountancy to the Management Graduates in a simplest form will make them understand the subject and enjoy the relevance of it in the present day. More specifically, Management graduates with non commerce discipline at graduation level can benefit a lot.
Views: 61 sanyasiraju
Capital Investment Models - Payback Period
 
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Payback period calculations Equal net cash inflows Unequal net cash inflows
Making Capital Investment Decisions
 
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Discusses which cash flows should be considered in capital budgeting analyses, constructing NPV spread sheets (see additional videos), equivalent (effective) annual cost, and the general decision to replace.
Views: 4438 Stephen Haggard
NPV and IRR explained
 
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Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return, in short NPV and IRR. What is the purpose of the NPV and IRR methods of investment analysis, and how do you calculate NPV and IRR? The main idea of Net Present Value is very simple: time is money! The net present value (or “discounted cash flow”) method takes the time value of money into account, by: - Translating all future cash flows into today’s money - Adding up today’s investment and the present values of all future cash flows If the net present value of a project is positive, then it is worth pursuing, as it creates value for the company. IRR is the discount rate at which the net present value becomes 0. In other words, you solve for IRR by setting NPV at 0. Related videos: How to calculate NPV in Excel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQ_NDQ2qVVA How to calculate IRR in Excel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0JCg5TXudc Philip de Vroe (The Finance Storyteller) aims to make strategy, finance and leadership enjoyable and easier to understand. Learn the business vocabulary to join the conversation with your CEO at your company. Understand how financial statements work in order to make better stock market investment decisions. Philip delivers #financetraining in various formats: YouTube videos, classroom sessions, webinars, and business simulations. Connect with me through Linked In!
Startup Funding Explained: Everything You Need to Know
 
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The Rest Of Us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheRestOfUs The Rest Of Us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/TROUchannel The Rest Of Us T-Shirts and More: http://teespring.com/TheRestOfUsClothing Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcjmVj5fM5k Credits: Music by The FatRat. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCa_UMppcMsHIzb5LDx1u9zQ If you're a YouTuber, definitely check The FatRat. The channel offers a wide variety of free-to-use music for your videos.
Views: 1446453 The Rest Of Us
A VC Reveals the Metrics They Use to Evaluate Startups — The Startup Tapes #031
 
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Subscribe by email to be alerted of new tapes: http://eepurl.com/cfiLt5 See all previous tapes on: http://tapes.scalevp.com So what actually happens before a VC decides to invest in your company? Susan Liu looks at hundreds of startups every year for B2B software investor Scale Venture Partners. She explains the top 5 metrics they look at, and how a company can prepare to pass the investor diligence with flying colors. Guest: Susan Liu Scale Venture Partners https://www.scalevp.com/ https://twitter.com/susanwliu Host: Tim Anglade Executive in Residence at Scale Venture Partners https://timanglade.com/ https://twitter.com/timanglade The Startup Tapes chronicle the highs & lows of building a startup, through candid interviews with founders, operators & advisors. Tim Anglade, an Executive-in-Residence at Scale Venture Partners and formerly with Realm, Apigee, and Cloudant leads the project with the goal to de-mystify the process through which startups emerge, grow & succeed. His unfiltered interviews transcribe the conversations we often hear in the boardroom, amongst our portfolio community and with entrepreneurs and partners we engage with every day. Learn more about Scale Venture Partners at http://www.scalevp.com. For guests suggestions, feedback or questions, email [email protected]
Views: 81611 scalevp
Finance tutorials | Performance Evaluation part 1: Return on Investment Capital - ROIC
 
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Return on Investment Capital (ROIC), Operating Profitability ratio (OP) and Capital Requirement ratio (CR).
Views: 14 Hai H.Trinh
Investment Appraisal WORKED ANSWER Part 1/2
 
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A2 Business Studies: Investment Appraisal: Applying the techniques of 'Average Rate of Return'; 'Payback' and 'Net Present Value' to an exam style question. This first video introduces the case study outline context and data needed to answer the question given at the end of the video. In part 2/2 I will guide you through a full answer to this question, both quantitively and qualitatively. My suggestion would be to watch this video with a pen and paper to note down any key information, and then attempt an answer BEFORE watching part 2/2 where you can check if you are correct! The question is styled on AQA BUSS3 - but is applicable to OCR F294 and EDEXCEL 6BS04 also. If you need further support on the techniques required check out the relevant video at the link below... ARR: https://youtu.be/cNC6K-L8fws Payback: https://youtu.be/oteEsh025pE NPV: https://youtu.be/zFAo_KZVlIU Good luck!
Views: 2447 Jon Turner
Ch-4 Capital Budgeting part 1 For B.com Delhi University -Financial Management
 
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This Course of Financial Management is meant for the students of Delhi University pursuing B. Com either Regular or Correspondence. The course is taught by M. S. Juneja
Views: 92604 JUNEJA ACCOUNTS SIR
How to Evaluate Investment Opportunities
 
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Description
Views: 902 FosterSwift
CapEx vs OpEx explanation
 
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CapEx versus OpEx. Capital Expenditures versus Operating Expenditures. There is a finance and accounting aspect to the terms CapEx and Opex, as well as a business model aspect. Let’s discuss both, and walk through some examples of how the terms CapEx and OpEx are used. CapEx is Capital Expenditures. OpEx is Operating Expenditures. What these terms have in common is the word expenditures, you are spending money, but in different ways. Capital Expenditures. As a working definition of CapEx, this is money spent by a business or organization to acquire or upgrade fixed assets, such as buildings, machines and equipment. Operating Expenditures. If CapEx is the upfront investment to buy a fixed asset, then a working definition of OpEx is the ongoing spending to keep the fixed asset running. For an expenditure to be considered as CapEx, you have to own an asset. There is a threshold level for expenditures to qualify as CapEx: there must be a useful life of more than one year, and the asset value must be more than a minimum amount. I have worked with a company where this minimum was $2500, and others where it was $7000. Please check with the finance department of your company on what your minimum level is. How about that part of maintenance where you are improving the performance of a machine and increase its capacity? What about software developed for internal use? What about the development phase of R&D? You could argue in all three cases that future economic benefits are generated by these projects, and according to the matching principle in finance it would be appropriate to capitalize these costs, and subsequently depreciate or amortize these assets over their useful life. Each of these cases will have to be evaluated carefully against current US GAAP or IFRS rules (depending on where your company is listed), and you will have to meet very strict criteria to apply a CapEx treatment. How does CapEx affect the financial statements? Let’s take a look at the balance sheet, the income statement and the cash flow statement, when we answer the question “does this expenditure qualify for CapEx (it meets the capitalization criteria) or it does not qualify as CapEx?”. First of all, the CapEx spend is a cash outflow recorded in “Cash From Investing Activities”. On the balance sheet, it gets accounted for as an asset, in the Plant and Equipment category. Over the years of its useful life, the asset gets depreciated, and the depreciation charge hits the income statement or P&L in each of the years of the assets’ economic life. I will link to my video about deprecation if you are interested in learning how that works: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SY8s1_OEro Do you go for the upfront CapEx investment to own servers for your datacenter, where you are unsure how much capacity you will actually need, or do you pay a monthly OpEx fee for an external cloud service where it’s pretty much “pay as you go” and “spend what you use”? I can’t give you a “one size fits all” answer to this question, it’s really something that an IT manager and a finance manager should analyze together. Risk and scale should be part of this conversation. The evaluation is a variation of the age-old “own versus use”, “buy versus rent”, “buy versus lease” discussion, which is more relevant than ever before in these days of ubiquitous digital devices and tools, disruption of mobility models through Uber and others, and disruption of the travel and leisure models through Airbnb. This video discusses the impact of CapEx versus OpEx on the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow statement, as well as ratios such as ROA. For more information on ROA and DuPont analysis, watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhbDDSohJ84 Philip de Vroe (The Finance Storyteller) aims to make strategy, finance and leadership enjoyable and easier to understand. Learn the business vocabulary to join the conversation with your CEO at your company. Understand how financial statements work in order to make better stock market investment decisions. Philip delivers training in various formats: YouTube videos, classroom sessions, webinars, and business simulations. Connect with me through Linked In!
ACCA F9 Investment Appraisal Under Uncertainty - Sensitivity Analysis (example 1)
 
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ACCA F9 Investment Appraisal Under Uncertainty - Sensitivity Analysis Free lectures for the ACCA F9 Financial Management To benefit from this lecture, visit opentuition.com to download the free lectures notes used in the lecture and access all our free resources including all F9 lectures, practice tests and Ask the Tutor Forums. http://opentuition.com/acca/f9/ Please go to opentuition to post questions to ACCA F9 Tutor, we do not provide support on youtube. *** Complete list of free ACCA F9 lectures is available on http://opentuition.com/acca/f9/ ***
Views: 13797 OpenTuition
Making Capital Investment Decisions Part 1
 
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Discusses which cash flows should be considered in capital budgeting analyses, constructing NPV spread sheets (see additional videos), equivalent (effective) . This video is part of a series of lectures that comprise an MBA level course in Corporate Finance. The lectures build on concepts and principals developed in . The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 10: . This video is part of a series of lectures that comprise an MBA level course in Corporate Finance. The lectures build on concepts and principals developed in .
Views: 476 Jan Ford
The 4 Most Important Financial Metrics
 
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Financial metrics are the key numbers that you can focus on in financial statements. There are three financial statements, the balance sheet, the income statement and the cash flow that we like to look at to find important metrics. http://bit.ly/2xOCmRl Were going to look at some of the most important financial metrics that you as investors can use to evaluate a company. The first important number we look at on the balance sheet is liquidity. Can the company you’re looking at really cover everything that they need to cover in the next year? Or have they somehow overloaded themselves with short term debt and obligations that they could really run out of cash in the next year? In order to evaluate this, we want to look at the current ratio. Essentially it is a measure of working capital. It compares the current assets, which are assets that can be turned into cash in the next year, with current liabilities, which are obligations that have to be paid in the next year. What you want to look for when evaluating a company is a 2:1 ratio of liquidity to debt. Some companies are very well run that have a lower ratios than that, because they are controlling their cash very well, or they are in an industry that isn’t growing fast so they don’t need as much liquidity. These companies work their capital down so they don’t need as much cash on hand all the time and they can give that money to their shareholders. You will know that these companies are very well run because, they are really big companies. Most companies, particularly smaller companies need at least a 2:1 ratio between current assets and current liabilities. That’s a great measure of liquidity. We call that the liquidity metric. To sign-up for my Transformational Investing Webinar, visit: http://bit.ly/2xOCmRl _____________ Learn more: Subscribe to my channel for free stuff, tips and more! YouTube: http://budurl.com/kacp Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rule1investing Twitter: https://twitter.com/Rule1_Investing Google+: + PhilTownRule1Investing Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/rule1investing LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/rule... Blog: http://budurl.com/9elj Podcast: http://bit.ly/1KYuWb4 _____________ finance metrics, key metrics, financial ratios, learn to invest, investing, trading, free cash flow, growth rate, key financial metrics, key financial ratios, top financial metrics,
What Working Capital Means in Valuation and Financial Modeling
 
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Why Does Working Capital Matter? Many places define it as Current Assets minus Current Liabilities - that is technically true, but it misses something important. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/biws/ WHY does it matter? What is the point of this? How do you use it? How does it impact a company's value? It's really the CHANGE in Working Capital that matters for valuation and financial modeling purposes. Working Capital, by itself, does not tell you a terrible amount and could mean many different things... but when you also look at the CHANGE in WC, what it is as a % of revenue and other metrics, AND the company's business model, that's when you start gaining insights. What Does the "Change" in Working Capital Mean? Best NOT to use the official definition of Current Assets minus Current Liabilities... First off, cash and debt should be excluded altogether because they are not operational line items and therefore won't factor in when calculating a company's Free Cash Flow in any type of valuation. Also, it's easier to think of this in terms of the *individual items* that comprise these Current, "Operating" Assets and Liabilities. Most Common Current, Operating Assets: Accounts Receivable, Inventory, and Prepaid Expenses. Commonality: Paid for them upfront in cash or represent cash payments you're waiting on. INCREASING these will cost you cash! Most Common Current, Operating Liabilities: Deferred Revenue, Accounts Payable, and Accrued Liabilities. Commonality: You get cash from these! When they increase, your cash flow goes up because you're getting cash in advance (Deferred Revenue) or because you're delaying payments (AP and AL). So with the "Change" in Working Capital, you're seeing which group of items increases by a greater amount: Current Assets Excluding Cash? or Current Liabilities Excluding Debt? If this Change is NEGATIVE, then Current Assets are increasing by MORE than Current Liabilities! Interpretation: Company might be spending a lot on Inventory, might be waiting too long for customer payments, might be paying suppliers very quickly... If this Change is POSITIVE, then Current Liabilities are increasing by more than Current Assets! Interpretation: Could be collecting a lot of cash upfront, might have no or minimal inventory, or might just be delaying payments to suppliers. Examples and Real World Interpretations: Wal-Mart's Change in Working Capital: It's always negative due to huge Inventory expenditures - since WMT is an offline retailer, it MUST pay for Inventory in advance before selling it. It does keep suppliers waiting a fair amount since its AP balance is also high and increasing each year, but Inventory spending outweighs that. This means that as Wal-Mart's business grows, it requires ADDITIONAL cash to keep growing! But as a % of revenue, this is very small so it makes a minimal impact. It will reduce the company's valuation in a DCF, though, because this will push down Free Cash Flow. Amazon's Change in Working Capital: Amazon's Change in WC, by contrast is positive each year. It's still spending a lot on inventory... and actually, as a % of revenue the change is higher than Wal-Mart's each year... BUT it is also not paying suppliers as quickly and is accruing more to the Accounts Payable balance each year. For WMT, the increase in Inventory exceeds the increase in AP every year... for Amazon it's the opposite! Plus, the Deferred Revenue from customers paying in cash in advance for products boosts Amazon's cash flow. The end result: for Amazon, the Change in Working Capital boosts its Free Cash Flow and therefore its valuation in a DCF - quite significantly since it exceeds Net Income. Salesforce's Change in Working Capital: Salesforce also has a positive Change in Working Capital... No inventory required since it's a subscription software company! BUT it still has AR, and Deferred Commissions - must be paid upfront to sales reps in cash and then recognized over term of subscription. The Net Change still ends up being positive, though, thanks to that huge increase in Deferred Revenue each year... subscriptions are often sold months or years in advance, but the cash is collected UPFRONT. So as Salesforce grows, it doesn't require additional cash - it actually GENERATES additional cash. This will increase its Free Cash Flow and therefore increase its valuation in a DCF. Summary - What Does the Change in Working Capital Mean? As the business grows, does it generate MORE cash than you expect... or it does it REQUIRE additional cash to grow? Makes a big difference for a DCF analysis when you value a company based on its cash flows, but also makes a difference for how much funding the business needs to grow, and even what happens when that business gets acquired. Further Resources http://youtube.breakingintowallstreet.com.s3.amazonaws.com/107-04-WMT-AMZN-CRM-Working-Capital.xlsx
Lecture 010-Capital Investment Analysis (with new audio)
 
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Lecture 010-Capital Investment Analysis
Views: 264 AccountingBytes
24-- Tools for Evaluating Capital Projects
 
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An overview of tools for evaluating capital projects, to accompany http://www.principlesofaccounting.com Chapter 24, Analytics for Managerial Decision Making. *Check out the Classroom page to find out how to take this course for credit: http://www.principlesofaccounting.com/classroom.html
Views: 6033 Larry Walther
A level Business Revision - Net Present Value Method of Investment Appraisal
 
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In this A level Business revision video, we complete our look at investment appraisal by learning about the Net Present Value method of investment appraisal. Some exam boards may refer to this method as the 'discounted cash flow' method. Investment appraisal is a crucial topic on the new AQA A level Business exam, the new edexcel Business specification and the new OCR Business A level. You can see our video on the payback method of investment herehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=teg0avCfFfI You can see our ARR video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZgaogeoynU&t=7s A level Business Studies Revision from Taking The Biz. See more of our videos: http://www.youtube.com/c/TakingTheBiz
Views: 12142 TakingTheBiz
Capital Budgeting Decision Methods
 
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chapter 10
Views: 41920 Michael Nugent
Free Cash Flow: How to Interpret It and Use It In a Valuation
 
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You'll learn what "Free Cash Flow" (FCF) means, why it's such an important metric when analyzing and valuing companies. By http://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" You'll also learn how to interpret positive vs. negative FCF, and what different numbers over time mean -- using a comparison between Wal-Mart, Amazon, and Salesforce as our example. Table of Contents: 0:54 What Free Cash Flow (FCF) is and Why It's Important 2:26 What Positive FCF Tells You, and What to Do With It 3:56 What Negative FCF Tells You, and What to Do With It 4:38 Why You Exclude Most Investing and Financing Activities in the FCF Calculation 7:55 How to Use and Interpret FCF When Analyzing Companies 11:58 Wal-Mart vs. Amazon vs. Salesforce: Free Cash Flow Across Sectors 19:33 Recap and Summary What is Free Cash Flow? Normally it's defined as Cash Flow from Operations minus Capital Expenditures. Tells you the company's DISCRETIONARY cash flow - after paying for expenses and working capital requirements like inventory and capital expenditures, how much cash flow can it put to use for other purposes? If the company generates a lot of Free Cash Flow, it has many options: hire more employees, spend more on working capital, invest in CapEx, invest in other securities, repay debt, issue dividends or repurchase shares, or even acquire other companies. If FCF is negative, you need to dig in and see if it's a one-time issue or recurring problem, and then figure out why: Are sales declining? Are expenses too high? Is the company spending too much on CapEx? If FCF is consistently negative, the company might have to raise debt or equity eventually, or it might have to restructure itself or cut costs in some other way. Why Do You Exclude Most Investing and Financing Activities Other Than CapEx? Because all other activities are, for the most part, "optional" and non-recurring. A normal company does not NEED to buy stocks or issue dividends or repurchase shares... those are all optional uses of cash. All it NEEDS to do to keep its business running is sell products to customers, pay for expenses, and keep investing in longer-term assets such as buildings and equipment (PP&E). Debt repayment and interest expense are "borderline" because some variations of Free Cash Flow will include them, others will exclude them, and some will include interest expense but not debt principal repayment. How Do You Use Free Cash Flow? It's used in a DCF (or at least, a variation of it) to value a company; it's also used in a leveraged buyout (LBO) model to determine how much debt a company can repay. And you can calculate it on a standalone basis for use when comparing different companies. The key is to DIG IN and see why Free Cash Flow is changing the way it is - Organic sales growth? Artificial cost-cutting? Accounting gimmicks? Different working capital policies? IDEALLY, FCF will be increasing because of higher units sales and/or higher market share, and/or higher margins due to economies of scale. Less Good: FCF is growing due to cost-cutting, CapEx slashing, or FCF is growing in spite of falling sales and profits... because of a company playing games with Working Capital, non-core activities, or CapEx spending. Wal-Mart vs. Amazon vs. Salesforce Comparison Main takeaway here is that Wal-Mart's FCF is all over the place, but Cash Flow from Operations is MOSTLY growing, so that appears to be driven by the also growing organic sales. The company is doing some odd things with CapEx and Working Capital, which led to fluctuations in FCF - not exactly "bad" or "good," just neutral and requires more research. With Amazon, they've increased CapEx spending massively in the past 2 years so that has pushed down CapEx. CFO is growing, driven by organic revenue growth (no "games" with Working Capital), but it's very difficult to assess whether all that CapEx spending will pay off in the long-term. With Salesforce, FCF is definitely growing organically (Revenue growth leads directly to CFO growth, and CapEx varies a bit but not as much as with Amazon), but the company is also spending a ton on acquisitions... will it continue? If CapEx as a % of revenue stays low, it will most likely continue to spend on acquisitions - unlikely to issue dividends, repurchase shares, etc. since it's a growth company. Further Resources http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/105-10-Free-Cash-Flow.xlsx http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/105-10-Walmart-Financial-Statements.pdf http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/105-10-Amazon-Financial-Statements.pdf http://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/105-10-Salesforce-Financial-Statements.pdf
Capital Investment in the Club Industry
 
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When every dollar counts, the ability to measure return on the club's capital investments is critical. The goal of capital projects is to attract and retain members and it IS possible to use data to prioritize projects so the club gets the most "bang for its buck." This video takes a closer look at the investment return cycle and helps boards and managers understand how to determine which investments make sense and how to measure the results.
Views: 745 Club Benchmarking
Capital Investment Analysis
 
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This video is a partial preview of the full business document. To view and download the full document, please go here: http://flevy.com/browse/business-document/capital-investment-analysis-230 Capital Investment Analysis Also called Capital Budgeting - a complex topic simplified in an easy to understand presentation which is completely self-explanatory. Explains the framework for financial analysis with examples and provides practical insights. Can be used for reference, training & self paced learning. The presentation includes examples worked in an Excel sheet. Covers: * The nature & characteristics of long term investments made by corporations * The problem associated with measuring the rate of return with long term investments * The approach to solving this problem * The key methods used in calculating the rate of return and evaluating alternatives * The practical aspects of the various inputs required to calculate the return on investment * The basics of the risks associated with long term investments & how to factor ?in such risks * The strategic considerations involved in long term investment decisions * The processes involved in long term investment decisions & its implementation
Managerial Accounting: Capital Investment Decisions and the Time Value of Money (Part 2)
 
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Lecture 12: *Capital Investment Decisions and the Time Value of Money (Part 2) * Master Budget & Responsibility Accounting (chapter 22 Part 1) by Professor Victoria Chiu (Chapters 21; chapter 22 is also started). The class begins with a brief recap of the previous lecture. Methods used to determine what investment to invest in are discussed (i.e. "Capital Investment Decisions"), such as NPV, IRR, and PI. After a few exercises are reviewed as well as the topics to be prepared for for the upcoming mid-term, the Professor moves on to cover chapter 22, which focuses on budgets (including why and how they are used). The steps to preparing an operating budget are also shown. Begins with Review of Previous Lecture Present Value Factors: 6:45 Present Value Factors for Annuities: 7:54 Net Present Value (NPV): 10:36 NPV with Equal Periodic Net Cash Inflows: 12:48 NPV with Unequal Periodic Net Cash Inflows: 13:53 Profitability Index: 15:30 NPV of Project with Residual Value: 18:00 Internal Rate of Return (IRR): 19:10 Computing IRR - Equal Cash Flows : 21:19 Exercise S21-2 and S21-11 (VERY briefly): 24:24 (NPV, IRR) Multiple-choice problems (conceptual): 25:28 --NEW CHAPTER BEGINS: CHAPTER 22-- Overview of learning objectives in chapter 22: 37:37 Budgets (why & how they are used): 38:42 Performance Report: 43:12 Steps to Prepare a [Master] Budget: 45:59 Flow-chart of Master Budget Components: 49:28 Exercise S22-2 : 53:13 (Components of the Master Budget) --Operating Budget Components and Preparation (3 parts)-- 55:28 -- (1) Sales Budget: 55:52 -- (2) Inventory Purchases and Cost of Goods Sold Budget: 58:58 -- (3) Operating Expenses: 1:08:06 Final Budgeted Income Statement: 1:12:13 To receive additional updates regarding our library please subscribe to our mailing list using the following link: http://rbx.business.rutgers.edu/subscribe.html
capital budgeting financial management in hindi II CA / CMA /CS /B.Com /MBA Lectures II 9717356614
 
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1.Significance of capital budgeting 2.Capital budgeting methods 3.Process of capital budgeting 4.Capital budgeting examples 5.Objectives of capital budgeting 6.Capital budgeting definition 7.Nature of capital budgeting 8.Features of capital budgeting 9.What do you mean by capital budgeting 10.What is meant by capital budgeting techniques 11.steps in the capital budgeting process 12.example of capital budgeting CA IPCC/INTER Fianancial Management (FM) Lectures -by CMA .chander dureja 9717356614: This is only a demo video. Classes are available for CA/CMA/CS. My all classes are available in Pen drive /Download link mode. For any query, please visit www.cdclasses.com or msg on 9717356614.
Views: 139329 CMA. Chander Dureja
Capital Budgeting
 
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It is the process of making decisions regarding long-term investments after evaluating the costs to be incurred and expected returns to be generated in form of cash flow and profit over a period of time These investment decisions are large in nature involving huge capital expenditure It facilitates comparative study of alternative projects It involves various techniques used to accept or reject any investment project Analysis of whether a project will be useful or not in regards of cost recovery, cash flows and required rate of return in a specific period of time Capital Budgeting Techniques Payback Period – It denotes the time period in which initial cost of investment would be recovered Accounting Rate of Return – It is a financial ratio representing the average rate of return on investment Net Present Value – It denotes the difference between present value of all cash inflows and present value of all cash outflows Benefit-Cost Ratio/ Profitability Index – It is a financial ratio representing the analysis of benefit from a project in respect to cost Internal Rate of Return – It is the rate at which NPV of all cashflow equals zero Thank You For Watching Subscribe to DevTech Finance
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Lesson 2 7 Investments in Working Capital
 
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4 Financial Evaluation and Strategy - Corporate Finance
Views: 82 Ryo Eng
Private Company Valuation
 
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In this tutorial, you'll learn how private companies are valued differently from public companies, including differences in the financial statements, the public comps, the precedent transactions, and the DCF analysis and WACC. Get all the files and the textual description and explanation here: http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/private-company-valuation/ Table of Contents: 1:29 The Three Types of Private Companies and the Main Differences 6:22 Accounting and 3-Statement Differences 12:04 Valuation Differences 16:14 DCF and WACC Differences 21:09 Recap and Summary The Three Type of Private Companies To master this topic, you need to understand that "private companies" are very different, even though they're in the same basic category. There are three main types worth analyzing: Money Businesses: These are true small businesses, owned by families or individuals, with no aspirations of becoming huge. They are often heavily dependent on one person or several individuals. Examples include restaurants, law firms, and even this BIWS/M&I business. Meth Businesses: These are venture-backed startups aiming to disrupt big markets and eventually become huge companies. Examples include Kakao, WhatsApp, Instagram, and Tumblr – all before they were acquired. Empire Businesses: These are large companies with management teams and Boards of Directors; they could be public but have chosen not to be. Examples include Ikea, Cargill, SAS, and Koch Industries. You see the most differences with Money Businesses and much smaller differences with the other two categories. The main differences have to do with accounting and the three financial statements, valuation, and the DCF analysis. Accounting and 3-Statement Differences Key adjustments might include "normalizing" the company's financial statements to make them compliant with US GAAP or IFRS, classifying the owner's dividends as a compensation expense on the Income Statement, removing intermingled personal expenses, and adjusting the tax rate in future periods. These points should NOT be issues with Meth Businesses (startups) or Empire Businesses (large private companies) unless the company is another Enron. Valuation Differences The valuation of a private company depends heavily on its purpose: are you valuing the company right before an IPO? Or evaluating it for an acquisition by an individual or private/public buyer? These companies might be worth very different amounts to different parties – they *should* be worth the most in IPO scenarios because private companies gain a larger, diverse shareholder base like that. You'll almost always apply an "illiquidity discount" or "private company discount" to the multiples from the public comps; a 10x EBITDA multiple is great, but it doesn't hold up so well if the comps have $500 million in revenue and your company has $500,000 in revenue. This discount might range from 10% to 30% or more, depending on the size and scale of the company you're valuing. Precedent Transactions tend to be more similar, and you don't apply the same type of huge discount there for larger private companies. You may see more "creative" metrics used, such as Enterprise Value / Monthly Active Users, especially for private mobile/gaming/social companies. DCF and WACC Differences The biggest problems here are the Discount Rate and the Terminal Value. The Discount Rate has to be higher for private companies, but you can't calculate it in the traditional way because private companies don't have Betas or Market Caps. Instead, you often use the industry-average capital structure or average from the comparables to determine the appropriate percentages, and then calculate Beta, Cost of Equity, and WACC based on that. There are other approaches as well – use the firm's optimal capital structure, create a giant circular reference, or use earnings volatility or dividend growth rates – but this is the most realistic one. You use this approach for all private companies because they all have the same problem (no Market Cap or Beta). You'll also have to discount the Terminal Value, but this is mostly an issue for Money Businesses because of their dependency on the owner and key individuals. You could heavily discount the Terminal Value, use the company's future Liquidation Value AS the Terminal Value, or assume the company stops operating in the future and skip Terminal Value entirely. Regardless of which one you use, Terminal Value will be substantially lower for this type of company. The result is that the valuation will be MOST different for a Money Business, with smaller, but still possibly substantial, differences for Meth Businesses and Empire Businesses. http://www.mergersandinquisitions.com/private-company-valuation/