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Hydrogen Bonds In Water Explained - Intermolecular Forces
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding occurs in molecules when hydrogen is attached to highly electronegative small atoms such as nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine. Hydrogen bonds are very strong dipole dipole interactions. Molecules that contain hydrogen bonds such as water are very polar. Hydrogen bonds is one of the strongest types of intermolecular forces. This video contains a few examples and illustrations of hydrogen bonds in water and in HF. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Hydrogen Bonds - What Are Hydrogen Bonds - How Do Hydrogen Bonds Form
 
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In this video we discuss hydrogen bonds. We cover how do hydrogen bonds form, the different elements that take part in hydrogen bonds, and why doesn't oil and water mix. What are hydrogen bonds? An attractive force called a hydrogen bond can exist between certain molecules. These bonds are weaker than ionic or covalent bonds, because it takes less energy to break these types of bonds, however, a large number of these bonds going on can exert a strong force. Hydrogen bonds are the result of an unequal charge distribution on a molecule, these molecules are said to be polar. If we look at a water molecule, we can see the oxygen atom shares electrons with 2 different hydrogen atoms. So, in total this molecule has 10 protons, 8 from oxygen and 1 each from the hydrogen atoms, and a total of 10 electrons, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number one, 2 shared between the oxygen atom and hydrogen atom number 2, and the other 6 non shared electrons from the oxygen atom. So, this water molecule is electrically neutral, but it has a partial positive side, the hydrogen side, and a partial negative side, the oxygen side of the molecule. The electrons are not shared equally within the molecule, as they have a higher probability of being found closer to the nucleus of the oxygen atom, giving that end a slightly negative charge. So, the hydrogen atoms end of the molecule will have a slightly positive charge. These charged ends weakly attach the positive end of one water molecule to the negative end of an adjacent water molecule. When water is in liquid form there a few hydrogen bonds, solid form, many bonds, and when water is steam or gas, there are no bonds, because the molecules are too far apart to form any bonds. Hydrogen bonds only form between hydrogen atoms that are covalently bonded, or bonds where electrons are being shared and not transferred, to an oxygen, nitrogen or fluorine atom. These bonds make water ideal for the chemistry of life. Hydrogen bonds are also important in the structure of proteins and nucleic acids, which we will cover in later videos. So, now we know that water molecules are polar, or have slightly positive and slightly negative ends, and in fact, many lipids, or fats and oils, are not polar. So their molecules share electrons equally in their bonds. So, these are nonpolar molecules. This means that when water and oil come together they do not form bonds with one another. Even when we try to mix them, the water molecules will eventually separate because their polar molecules are attracted to one another and will form hydrogen bonds, separating the water and the nonpolar oil molecules.
Views: 101016 Whats Up Dude
Hydrogen bonding in water | Water, acids, and bases | Biology | Khan Academy
 
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Reactants and products in reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/water-acids-and-bases/hydrogen-bonding-in-water/v/hydrogen-bonding-in-water?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/biology/chemistry--of-life/chemical-bonds-and-reactions/v/intermolecular-forces-and-molecular-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=biology Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Biology channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC82qE46vcTn7lP4tK_RHhdg?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 264816 Khan Academy
Ionic and Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, van der Waals - 4 types of Chemical Bonds in Biology
 
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There are four types of chemical bonds essential for life to exist: Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Hydrogen Bonds, and van der Waals interactions. We need all of these different kinds of bonds to play various roles in biochemical interactions. These bonds vary in their strengths. In Chemistry, we think of Ionic Bonds and Covalent bonds as having an overlapping range of strengths. But remember, in biochemistry, everything is happening in the context of water. This means Ionic bonds tend to dissociate in water. Thus, we will think of these bonds in the following order (strongest to weakest): Covalent, Ionic, Hydrogen, and van der Waals. Also note that in Chemistry, the weakest bonds are more commonly referred to as “dispersion forces.” Related Chemistry video: Ionic Bonds vs Covalent Bonds http://bit.ly/2cUG6C8 Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. ***** Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ***** This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon. We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Vishal Shah. We’re so thankful for your support! ***** Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ***** Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ****** Creative Commons Picture Credits: Salt crystals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Halit-Kristalle.jpg Author: W.J. Pilsak Hydrogen Bonding in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Products in this video: Preparing for the Biology AP* Exam (School Edition) (Pearson Education Test Prep) - http://amzn.to/2qJVbxm Cracking the AP Biology Exam, 2017 Edition: Proven Techniques to Help You Score a 5 (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qB3NsZ Cracking the SAT Biology E/M Subject Test, 15th Edition (College Test Preparation) - http://amzn.to/2qJIfHN
Views: 42875 Socratica
Hydrogen Bonding
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to determine which molecules are capable of exhibiting hydrogen bonding. Examples and practice problems include the following molecules: H2O, CH4, CH3F, HF, CH3OH, CH3OCH3, CH3COOH, CH3CHO, H2S, NH3, PH3, (CH3)3N, (CH3)2NH, C2H4, C2H2, HOCH2CH2OH, CH3SH, and CH3CONH2. This video also discusses the difference between a hydrogen bond and a covalent bond and the difference between an intermolecular bond and an intramolecular bond. it shows the formation and hydrogen bonding that occurs between water molecules.
Properties of Water
 
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Explore some properties of water with the Amoeba Sisters! It's all about those hydrogen bonds. Video has handout: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts Terms discussed include adhesion, cohesion, surface tension, specific heat - all made possible by those amazing hydrogen bonds. Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology *We mention that water makes up "3/4 of the Earth's surface" and we wish we had said "nearly" This number is going to be an estimate, but here is a source that puts it around 71%. https://water.usgs.gov/edu/earthhowmuch.html We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages. YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are thankful for those that contribute different languages. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 771389 Amoeba Sisters
Hydrogen Bonding and Common Mistakes
 
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To see all my Chemistry videos, check out http://socratic.org/chemistry Hydrogen bonding can be so confusing, and in this video we talk about some common mistakes. Hydrogen bonds are intermolecular forces between molecules. They form because one atom has a high electronegativity, so it gets a partial negative charge, and the hydrogen gets a partial positive charge.
Views: 574760 Tyler DeWitt
Using Bond Energy to find Enthalphy
 
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webpage-http://www.kentchemistry.com/links/Kinetics/BondEnergy.htm This short video shows you how to calculate the enthalphy of a reaction (delta H) using bond energies. Delta H=broken minus formed Example problems: Combustion of Hydrogen Combustion of Propane
Views: 157624 kentchemistry.com
Bond Energy Calculations & Enthalpy Change Problems, Basic Introduction, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to calculate the enthalpy of reaction by using the average bond dissociation energies listed in a table. It contains examples and practice problems of calculating the enthalpy of formation of 1 mole of HCl, the enthalpy of combustion of methane and the enthalpy of reaction between methane and chlorine. The enthalpy of reaction is equal to the sum of all the bond energies of the reactant minus the sum of all the bond energies of the products. Breaking a bond is an endothermic process while forming a bond is an exothermic process. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Hydrogen Bonding in Water
 
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Video Description In this video we describe the electrostatics of Hydrogen bonding in water and its importance in the structure of liquid water. The BioPandit Team Saurav Mallik: Senior Ph.D student in the Department of Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Calcutta, India. Known as the Maha-Pandit in BioPandit videos. Saurav works in the interface of structural and evolutionary bioinformatics and has published 9 research papers in leading scientific journals. ResearchGate Profile: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Saurav_Mallik. Sudipto Basu: Junior Ph.D student in the Department of Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Calcutta, India. Known as the Chote-pandit in BioPandit videos. With his comprehensive biological knowledge (GATE-qualified), Sudipto works on the structural and evolutionary aspects of RNA folding and gene expression. Suman Hait: Junior Ph.D student in the Department of Biophysics, Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics, University of Calcutta, India. Known as the Bade-pandit in BioPandit videos. With his advanced computational skills (GATE, BINC and NET LS-qualified) Suman works on the structural and evolutionary aspects of protein-RNA complexes and gene expression.
Views: 847 BioPandit
Chemical Energetics - Bond breaking and bond making
 
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Energy changes in a reaction in terms of bond breaking and bond making. I am available for private tutoring via Skype or Google+ Hangouts. Send me a message on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/TachyonEd to arrange a lesson today! exothermic, endothermic, bonds, breaking, making, chemical, energetics, energy, energy level diagram, reactants, products, energy change, heat, enthalpy,entropy, heat change, thermodynamics, cells, battery, fuel, nuclear, thermal, thermochemistry, igcse, gcse, ap, ib, cambridge, london, oxford, ucas, uk, 0620, a levels, o levels, ks3, ks4
Views: 37870 Alex Tah
Properties of Water | Polarity | Hydrogen Bonds | Adhesion & Cohesion
 
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You drink it, clean with it, and swim in it, but do you really understand it? Take a few minutes and learn about how awesome water really is. Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2wJ0DHa TheCrazyChosenOne: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_Oz1ntBqRGuhZ5g9MvgyqA Learn more about water! https://owlcation.com/stem/5-Properties-of-Water https://socratic.org/questions/what-are-some-examples-of-properties-of-water https://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/earth/geophysics/h2o7.htm Now, on to water aka dihydrogen monoxide aka H2O. Water is made up of one oxygen atom, and two hydrogen atoms. And looks something like this. This structure makes water a very polar molecule. Without going into the beautiful details, Oxygen has a net negative charge while the opposite ends with the hydrogens have a net positive charge. This allows water molecules to form hydrogen bonds and gives water many of its other properties. Cohesion and Adhesion are two such properties. Cohesion is water’s attraction to itself. The hydrogen bonds that I mentioned facilitate this. This is also why water has surface tension, allowing bugs to walk on it. Additionally, cohesion keeps water a liquid at moderate temperatures instead of a gas. Adhesion is water’s attraction to other surfaces. Water will adhere to anything it can form a hydrogen bonds with. This is the reason for capillary action, where water climbs up a narrow glass tube. Another property of water is it’s high heat capacity. Heat capacity is a substance ability to absorb heat. More accurately, it’s the amount of energy needed to raise one gram of a substance by one degree celsius. This allows water to absorb temperature changes and keep air temperature at moderate levels. Which is pretty cool… Finally, water is known as the universal solvent, meaning that a wide range of substances can be dissolved in it. This includes hydrophilic and polar molecules like sugars and salts. Substances that generally don’t dissolve in water are hydrophobic, like oils. So now you know a little more about the properties of H2O, and bare in mind, we only covered a portion of water’s amazing properties, so be sure to check the links in the description to learn more. And, as always throw any questions in the comment section! Now, I want to give a shoutout to one of my subscribers, TheCrazyChosenOne. The channel is linked below. It’s a gaming channel with a lot of Fortnite recently, and who doesn’t love some Fortnite gameplay, am I right? Easy listening, enjoyable watching. The channel is not limited though, it features a wide variety of game from Minecraft to Call of Duty. So check it out, and if you like the content, give it some love with likes, comments, and a sub. If you want your channel featured in my next vid, let me know. I’ll catch you next time.
Views: 1854 2 Minute Classroom
Water - Liquid Awesome: Crash Course Biology #2
 
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Hank teaches us why water is one of the most fascinating and important substances in the universe. Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Review: Re-watch = 00:00 Introduction = 00:42 Molecular structure & hydrogen bonds = 01:38 Cohesion & surface tension = 02:46 Adhesion = 03:31 Hydrophilic substances = 04:42 Hydrophobic substances = 05:14 Henry Cavendish = 05:49 Ice Density = 07:45 Heat Capacity = 09:10 Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Citations: http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/youthdevelopment/components/0328-02.html http://www.uni.edu/~iowawet/H2OProperties.html http://www.hometrainingtools.com/properties-water-science-teaching-tip/a/1274/ http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/earth/geophysics/h2o7.htm http://www.robinsonlibrary.com/science/chemistry/biography/cavendish.htm http://chemistry.mtu.edu/~pcharles/SCIHISTORY/HenryCavendish.html http://www.nndb.com/people/030/000083778/ http://www.notablebiographies.com/Ca-Ch/Cavendish-Henry.html TAGS: water, hydrogen, oxygen, molecule, covalent bond, cohesion, adhesion, polarity, hydrogen bond, surface tension, capillary action, hydrophilic, hydrophobic, ionic bond, ion, universal solvent, henry cavendish, chemistry, specific gravity, density, heat capacity, evaporation, biology, crashcourse, crash course, hank green Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 3172850 CrashCourse
11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 16 || Hydrogen Bonding IIT JEE MAINS / NEET ||
 
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To support me in my journey you can donate ([email protected] 9161123482) or Alakh Pandey ,Bank of Baroda, Rajrooppur, Allahabad,U.P IFSC: BARB0RAJROO Account No: 19210100020819 A small amount of Rs 100 even will be of great help. Follow us on: Instagram https://www.instagram.com/physicswallah/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/physicswallah 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 01| Introduction | Cause of Chemical Bonding | https://youtu.be/daPAcFFSFdY 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 02 | Ionic Bond | Electrovalent Bond IIT JEE https://youtu.be/OqdNZTHxPxM 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding and Molecular Structure 03| Lattice Energy | Born Haber Cycle IIT JEE | https://youtu.be/ch9HorGagHE 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 04 || Fazan's RULE || Covalent Character in Ionic Compounds | https://youtu.be/d3iFlT8SlvA 11 Chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 05 || Lewis Dot Structure || How to draw Lewis Dot Structure Of || https://youtu.be/8-Qs1mnoJ2M 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 06 || Valence Bond Theory VBT || Difference between sigma and Pi Bond https://youtu.be/8B__xDUKqbM 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 07 | Pi Bond | P Pi - D Pi | P Pi - P Pi | IIT JEE NEET Pi Bond https://youtu.be/IrX7AcU07To Chemical Bonding 08 | Hybridisation | How to Find Hybridisation | Hybridisation of Atom IIT JEE NEET https://youtu.be/AvhUUY8yD08 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 09 | VSEPR theory | Shapes of Molecules | Geometry , Hybridisation ,etc https://youtu.be/x2-nP7i6T34 11 Chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 10 | Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part I Introduction | https://youtu.be/TQEhLXkNdmo Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 11 || Molecular Orbital Theory IIT JEE NEET || MOT Part II || https://youtu.be/XCwMrnVvSTU Class 11 chap 4 | Chemical Bonding 12 || Dipole Moment IIT JEE NEET || Polar and Non Polar Molecule https://youtu.be/4KDkldXTj6w 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 13 || Bond Angle || Tricks For Bond Angle IIT JEE NEET || BOND ANGLE https://youtu.be/AjWwHkAlPSo 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 14 || Dragos Rule || Bond Angle Dragos Rule IIT JEE ADVANCE / NEET https://youtu.be/GfKmguqX-2g 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 15 || Vanderwaal Forces || IIT JEE NEET || London Forces , etc || https://youtu.be/664YicsoYkg 11 chap 4 || Chemical Bonding 16 || Hydrogen Bonding IIT JEE MAINS / NEET || https://youtu.be/k8tYXDKb2yE
Properties of Water: Hydrogen Bonding | A-level Biology | OCR, AQA, Edexcel
 
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Properties of Water: Hydrogen Bonding in a Snap! Unlock the full A-level Biology course at http://bit.ly/2togNBT created by Adam Tildesley, Biology expert at SnapRevise and graduate of Cambridge University. SnapRevise is the UK’s leading A-level and GCSE revision & exam preparation resource offering comprehensive video courses created by A* Oxbridge tutors. Our courses are designed around the OCR, AQA, SNAB, Edexcel B, WJEC, CIE and IAL exam boards, concisely covering all the important concepts required by each specification. In addition to all the content videos, our courses include hundreds of exam question videos, where we show you how to tackle questions and walk you through step by step how to score full marks. Sign up today and together, let’s make A-level Biology a walk in the park! The key points covered in this video include: Introduction to Water Chemical Structure of Water The Polar Nature of Water Hydrogen Bonding in Water Introduction to Water Water is a major component of all cells and has many important roles within organisms. Water has an important role in synthesising and breaking down biological molecules in condensation and hydrolysis reactions. Water is also a key reactant used in photosynthesis. Water also has many other essential roles for life due to its unique properties - these properties occur due to its structure. Chemical Structure of Water Water consists of 2 hydrogen atoms and 1 oxygen atom, giving it the molecular formula H2O. The hydrogen atoms are bonded to oxygen atoms through covalent bonds. Covalent bonds are formed when electrons are shared between two atoms in order to fill the outer shell. A covalent bond is one in which two atoms share the same pair of electrons. The Polar Nature of Water The electrons in the covalent bonds of water are not equally shared - they lie closer to the oxygen nucleus than the hydrogen nuclei. This is because the negative electrons are more attracted to the oxygen nucleus as there are more positively charged protons. The unequal sharing of the electrons result in the oxygen atom being slightly negative and the hydrogen atoms being slightly positive. The uneven distribution of charge across the water molecule makes it a polar molecule. Polar molecules are molecules that have an uneven distribution of charge. Hydrogen Bonding in Water The slightly positive hydrogen atoms in one water molecule are attracted to the slightly negative oxygen atom in another water molecule. This attraction is called a hydrogen bond and is weaker than a covalent bond but stronger than most intermolecular forces. A hydrogen bond is a weak interaction that occurs between a slightly negatively charged atom and a slightly positively charged atom. Although each individual hydrogen bond is weak, water forms many of these hydrogen bonds. The polar nature of water along with the formation of these hydrogen bonds give water many unique properties that are essential for life. Summary Water is an essential component of cells with major roles in metabolism, including condensation and hydrolysis reactions Water is composed of an oxygen atom joined to two hydrogen atoms with covalent bonds The negative electrons are more attracted to the oxygen atom than the hydrogen atoms This results in an uneven distribution of charge across the molecule, making it polar Hydrogen bonds occur between polar molecules like water as there is a weak attraction between slightly positive and slightly negative atoms The polar nature of water and the formation of hydrogen bonds give water many unique properties that are essential for life
Views: 210 SnapRevise
Hydrogen Bond in Water Molecule
 
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Enjoy the video guys. And don't forget to give it a thumbs up! :)
Views: 189 DNAwesome UiTM Arau
Hydrogen Bonding- Water Drops On A Penny
 
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A Discrepant Event is something that will astonish the observer. So how many drops of water can you pile on a penny? It is very incredible. Can you do better? This experiment demonstrates the cohesive forces of water also known as Hydrogen Bonds. These forces are responsible for water forming droplets instead of spreading out.
Views: 62763 kentchemistry.com
Properties of Water | Hydrogen Bonding in Water | Biology | Biochemistry
 
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Why is water essential for Life to exist on Earth? We are about 60% water - and there are some organisms that are as much as 90% water! What is so important about water? How does it support life? In this video, we discuss the special properties of water that make it the “Solvent of Life.” Chief among these properties is the extensive Hydrogen Bonding between water molecules that make water an extremely cohesive liquid (the molecules stick together). Due to the extensive hydrogen bonding, water has some emergent properties that impact life on Earth in many ways. These include: Cohesion Adhesion High surface tension High specific heat High heat of vaporization Ice Floats (Ice is less dense as a solid than liquid water) For each of these properties, we discuss how they impact living creatures on Earth. ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Our series on Biology is aimed at the first-year college level, including pre-med students. These videos should also be helpful for students in challenging high school biology courses. Perfect for preparing for the AP Biology exam or the Biology SAT. Also appropriate for advanced homeschoolers. You can also follow along if you are just curious, and would like to know more about this fascinating subject. Our current biology textbook recommendation is Campbell Biology from Pearson. 10th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2mahQTi 11th edition Amazon Link: http://amzn.to/2m7xU6w Shop Amazon Used Textbooks - Save up to 90% http://amzn.to/2pllk4B For lighter reading, we recommend: I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life by Ed Yong http://amzn.to/2pLOddQ Lab Girl by Hope Jahren http://amzn.to/2oMolPg ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ This video was made possible by the generous donations of our Patrons on Patreon! We dedicate this video to our VIP Patron, Tracy Karin Prell. Tracy is an amazing advocate for science communication. Thank you so much, Tracy! ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Please Subscribe so you'll hear about our newest videos! http://bit.ly/1ixuu9W If you found this video helpful, please give it a "thumbs up" and share it with your friends! If you'd like to support more great educational videos from Socratica, please consider becoming our Patron on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/socratica ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Directed by Michael Harrison Written and Produced by Kimberly Hatch Harrison About our instructor: Kimberly Hatch Harrison received degrees in Biology and English Literature from Caltech before working in pharmaceuticals research, developing drugs for autoimmune disorders. She then continued her studies in Molecular Biology (focusing on Immunology and Neurobiology) at Princeton University, where she began teaching as a graduate student. Her success in teaching convinced her to leave the glamorous world of biology research and turn to teaching full-time, accepting a position at an exclusive prep school, where she taught biology and chemistry for eight years. She is now the head writer and producer of Socratica Studios. ❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀❀ Creative Commons Picture Credits Basilisk running on water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Basiliscus_basiliscus_running_on_water_-_pone.0037300.s001.ogv Author: Minetti et al. xylem http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0089934 Author: Boutilier et al 2014 PLOS Meniscus http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0050320 Author: Jingmin et al 2012 PLOS Little girl drinking https://pixabay.com/en/girl-thirsty-drink-fountain-water-2241750/ Author: brisch27 Army scout drinking https://pixabay.com/en/girl-scout-army-thirsty-sensuality-932421/ Author: AdinaVoicu Water drop Macro View http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=173836&picture=water-drop-macro-view Author: JeanBeauford Woman in the Ocean http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=172525&picture=woman-in-the-ocean Author: JeanBeauford Water on fabric https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water_droplet_lying_on_a_damask.jpg Author: Petar Milosevic Water strider https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:WaterstriderEnWiki.jpg Author: PD Polar bear on ice https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Polar_Bear_AdF.jpg Author: Arturo de Frias Marques Penguins on ice https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pygoscelis_antarctica_trying_to_get_to_iceberg.wmv.ogv Author: Brocken Inaglory Cells (colourized) https://pixabay.com/en/white-blood-cell-cell-blood-cell-543471 Author: skeeze Hydrogen bonds in water https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:3D_model_hydrogen_bonds_in_water.svg Author: Qwerter Water strider footage https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vesimittareita.ogv Author: Uusijani roadrunner https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_Greater_Roadrunner_Walking.jpg Author: Jessie Eastland Partially frozen pond http://www.publicdomainpictures.net/view-image.php?image=15079&picture=partially-frozen-pond Author: David Wagner
Views: 26005 Socratica
What are the Factors affecting Strength of Hydrogen Bond - H2ChemHacks
 
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Hydrogen Bonds are found between simple molecules that contain either H-F, H-O or H-N bonds. Two factors affect the effectiveness of Hydrogen bonds and hence the boiling point of the molecule. The first factor is extensiveness of the Hydrogen bond, or the average number of Hydrogen bonds each molecule can form. If a molecule can form more Hydrogen bonds, then during boiling more Hydrogen bonds need to be broken which results in a higher boiling point. The second factor is the polarity of the H-F, H-O and H-N bond. In H-F bond is the most polar hence the hydrogen bond that results from this is the strongest, while H-N bond is the least polar which results in the weakest hydrogen bond. To learn more about each of these factors and when to consider them, watch this video tutorial now! Topic - Chemical Bonding, Physical Chemistry, JC, H2, A Level Chemistry, Singapore Found this video useful? Please LIKE this video and SHARE it with your friends. SUBSCRIBE to my YouTube Channel for new A Level H2 Chemistry video lessons every week! Any feedback, comments or questions to clarify? Suggestions for new video lessons? Drop them in the COMMENTS Section, I would love to hear from you! Do you know you can learn Chemistry Concepts under a minute? Follow me on Instagram for my weekly one-minute video lessons at https://www.instagram.com/chemistryguru/ I am also conducting JC H2 Chemistry classes at Bishan Central, Singapore. With my years of experience tutoring hundreds of JC students since 2010, I am confident that I can make H2 Chemistry Simpler for you too! For more information please visit https://chemistryguru.com.sg/ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch my latest video: "Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) Theory and Shapes of Molecules" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_NeyW5pe-Y -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Chemical Bonding Introduction: Hydrogen Molecule, Covalent Bond & Noble Gases
 
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Chemical bonding introduction video shows how covalent bond means 2 hydrogen atoms can stick together to form a hydrogen molecule, H2. The video also explains why helium cannot form bonds and hence is called a noble gas. Subscribe to watch more online chemistry courses & science videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiX8pAYWBppIbtUZTfGnRJw?sub_confirmation=1 About Atomic School: Atomic School supports the teaching of Atomic Theory to primary school & science students . We provide lesson plans, hands-on classroom resources, demonstration equipment, quizzes and a Teacher's Manual to primary school teachers. Animated videos that clearly explain the scientific ideas supports learning by both teachers and students. As a teacher, you don't have to look anywhere else to implement this program. Our work has been verified by science education researchers at the University of Southern Queensland, Dr Jenny Donovan and Dr Carole Haeusler, who confirm that primary students are capable of learning much more complex scientific concepts than previously thought, and crucially, that they love it. Students run to class! The program has been trialed in Australian schools as well as schools in the Philippines, Iran and India. It is conducted as holiday workshops at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, the Queensland Museum as well as the World Science Festival. It has attracted wide media interest, including TV, radio and print, and the research data has been presented at prestigious American Education Research Association and Australian Science Education Research Association conferences. Atomic Theory underlies all the other sciences- genetics, electronics, nanotechnology, engineering and astronomy- so an early understanding will set them up for a more successful learning sequence for all their science subjects, and support their mastery of mathematics as well. We also have extension programs that cover Biology, Physics and Astronomy to an equal depth. About Ian Stuart (Email: [email protected]): The founder of Atomic School, Ian Stuart, taught Chemistry and Physics for 25 years at senior levels before he realized that his 8-year old son, Tom, could understand Atomic Theory at a much deeper level than he expected. After visiting Tom's class at school, he discovered that his peers could also grasp the abstract scientific concepts, as well as apply it usefully to the real world. Ian then developed a program to teach the advanced concepts of high school Chemistry, Physics and Biology to students 10 years younger than they normally would. He found that this engaged their interest in modern science early, and sustained it through to high school and beyond. It also sets them up for future success in their academic and career paths. Ian has a Bachelor's Degree in Chemistry from the University of Queensland and a Master's degree in Electrochemistry from the University of Melbourne. Connect with Atomic School on social media: http://facebook.com/AtomicSchool http://twitter.com/AtomicSchools http://instagram.com/AtomicSchools Video transcript: Let's do a thought experiment. Imagine a box filled with hydrogen atoms. Like billiard balls on a pool table, atoms actually move, and they do it in straight lines until they hit something … like another hydrogen atom. Oh! See that? They stuck together. They’re not separate hydrogen atoms any more, but a pair of hydrogen atoms moving together. There goes another pair. 4.1 When atoms join up like this, scientists call it a molecule. And they call the join between them a chemical bond. Here comes another hydrogen atom crashing into the hydrogen molecule. But this time it doesn’t stick. Instead it just bounces off. Hydrogen atoms bond once, and that’s it. They’re just like that. Pretty quickly all the hydrogen atoms will collide and pair off into molecules. They will keep hitting each other, but they'll just bounce off. Scientists like to have a shorthand way of writing this molecule thingi. Here’s one way to show it, with the hydrogen symbols joined by a stick to show the chemical bond between the atoms. Another way is to write H2, with the little 2 after the H and a bit lower. A number written this way is called a subscript. What do you think the 2 stands for? It counts the number of hydrogen atoms in the molecule. Easy, heh! So when we have a balloon filled with hydrogen gas, it really contains trillions of trillions of H2 molecules. Let's do another thought experiment. We'll go back to our box filled with hydrogen atoms, but this time put an oxygen atom in there too. When a hydrogen atom crashes into an oxygen atom, they stick together. But wait, when another hydrogen atom hits, it also sticks to the oxygen. What about a third hydrogen atom? No, that’s if for oxygen. It can only make 2 bonds and then it’s done.
Views: 140253 AtomicSchool
The Hydrogen Bonding Angle of Water
 
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Download at http://itsrainmakingtime.com/john-ellis-hydrogen-bonding-angle-water/ Inventor John Ellis has revolutionized water filtration for decades with a lightweight, patented technology for energizing and distilling tap water. Sickly and weak from radium treatments in his youth, John began to look for a way to reverse the damage. He developed a device that would recycle water hundreds of times per gallon -- a much more thorough process than the water filtration processes commonly used in the public domain. By using a proprietary method for heating, cooling, and distilling water, John Ellis was able to produce water 827 times purer than what comes out of municipal water supplies. The results, verified by York Labs, confirmed that water from John's machines was even purer than the lab standard for pure water. John Ellis is an alumnus of The Choate School and Lafayette College, where he earned an engineering degree in steam plant design. He went on to work at Douglas Aerospace and later Honeywell, where he developed his patented technology for recycling, energizing, and distilling water. It's Rainmaking Time!® learned in 2004 that simply filtering or heating water is an ineffective measure against infection by pathogenic bacteria. Our interview with the stewards of the water industry highlighted the fact that removing toxic materials from water does not remove their energetic signatures. In our ongoing investigation of the science of water, we learned about the healing and energetic properties of structured water, which is determined by the hydrogen bonding angle. According to John Ellis, whereas the bonding angle for ordinary water is 104 degrees, and 101 degrees for distilled water, the bonding angle between hydrogen molecules in water produced by his device is 114 degrees. Water that has been structured this way holds up to 3000% more energy, and is sufficient to destroy disease markers in the bloodstream. John Ellis' water filtration methodology represents a major step forward in personal health empowerment, anti-aging, and disease prevention. Join us with the inventor himself as we discuss the history, evidence, and testimonials that support this unprecedented breakthrough in water structuring technology.
Views: 41127 ItsRainmakingTime
Atomic Hook-Ups - Types of Chemical Bonds: Crash Course Chemistry #22
 
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Atoms are a lot like us - we call their relationships "bonds," and there are many different types. Each kind of atomic relationship requires a different type of energy, but they all do best when they settle into the lowest stress situation possible. The nature of the bond between atoms is related to the distance between them and, like people, it also depends on how positive or negative they are. Unlike with human relationships, we can analyze exactly what makes chemical relationships work, and that's what this episode is all about. If you are paying attention, you will learn that chemical bonds form in order to minimize the energy difference between two atoms or ions; that those chemical bonds may be covalent if atoms share electrons, and that covalent bonds can share those electrons evenly or unevenly; that bonds can also be ionic if the electrons are transferred instead of shared: and how to calculate the energy transferred in an ionic bond using Coulomb's Law. -- Table of Contents Bonds Minimize Energy 01:38 Covalent Bonds 03:18 Ionic Bonds 05:37 Coulomb's Law 05:51 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1784188 CrashCourse
Hydrogen Bonding Tricks
 
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Thank you all for the support offered. It motivates me to do better. Link for notes: https://jeepmt.wordpress.com My Unacademy profile link: https://unacademy.com/user/sachinranaIITB Link to the books I had used during my preparation: https://bestbooksjeeneetaiims.wordpress.com/2018/05/21/sr Follow me on Instagram to get Bloopers and much more: https://www.instagram.com/sachin._.rana/
Views: 31039 Sachin Rana [IITB]
Why do H2O Molecules form more Hydrogen Bonds compared to NH3 and HF Molecules
 
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H2O molecules have two Hydrogens bonded to an extremely electronegative Oxygen. The H therefore has strong partial positive charge. The Oxygen on the other hamd has two spare lone pairs which have high charge density. So overall two lone pairs will attract two partial positive H. In NH3, Nitrogen has only one lone pair but three partial positive Hydrogen that are directly bonded to electronegative Nitrogen. Now 1 lone pair on N will only attract 1 partial positive H. 2 partial positive will then not be able to attract lone pairs as lone pairs are not available. so fewer hydrogen bonds will be formed. In HF, there is only 1 partial positive H but three lone pairs on Flourine. So again, two extra lone pairs will not be able to form Hydrogen bonds due to non availability of partial positive H, so few Hydrogen bonds will be formed in HF. Hence NH3 and HF will have lesser melting and boiling points compared to H2O. For more Video Lectures for O Levels, A Levels, IB Diploma, AP Courses & Edexcel: https://www.megalecture.com https://www.youtube.com/megalecture For Skype/Whiteboard Subject Experts and Tutors and Free Online Trial Classes, Contact: [email protected]
Views: 476 Mega Lecture
Covalent Bonding in Water, Methane, Ammonia & Hydrogen Fluoride | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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In this video we will look at covalent bonds in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride. They are small, covalently-bonded molecules. The atoms within them share electrons because they have half full or more than half full valence shells of electrons: they are non-metals. Methane is a fuel, ammonia is used in household cleaners, water is a drink and the essence of life, and hydrogen fluoride is used to etch glass. The bonding in methane, ammonia, water and hydrogen fluoride shows a pattern: methane is carbon bonded to four hydrogen atoms; ammonia is nitrogen bonded to three hydrogen atoms; water is oxygen bonded to two hydrogen atoms, and hydrogen fluoride is fluorine bonded to just one hydrogen atom. Carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and fluorine appear in the periodic table in this order, moving along the second row from left to right. Carbon has four out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so makes four covalent bonds. Nitrogen has five out of eight electrons in its outer shell, so can make three covalent bonds to make the shell full. Oxygen has 6 electrons in its outer shell. It can bond with two hydrogen atoms to share 2 more electrons. It now has a full outer shell of 8 electrons. Ammonia has two electrons, called a lone pair of electrons, occupying the fourth position. These electrons take up space. Because electrons are negatively charged, lone pairs repel bonds even more strongly than bonds repel each other. This makes ammonia less symmetric than methane. The water molecule is bent in shape. Oxygen has two lone pairs. Negatively charged lone pairs are slightly attracted to the hydrogen atoms, so there is a weak attraction between molecules. Forces between molecules are a little stronger in water than in ammonia or methane. Water is liquid at room temperature and pressure, whilst ammonia a gas that is easily liquefied, and methane is a gas. Intermolecular forces are normally very weak in covalent compounds, but in water they are just strong enough to keep it liquid. A bit more energy is needed to overcome these forces and boil it. If water were not a liquid, life as we know it would be completely different! Ethanol contains carbon and oxygen bonding. The carbon atoms always form four bonds and the oxygen forms two. Remember, carbon forms 4 bonds, nitrogen forms 3 bonds and has one lone pair of electrons, and oxygen forms two bonds and looks bent. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole Dipole Interactions - Boiling Point & Solubility
 
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This organic chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into intermolecular forces, hydrogen bonding, and dipole dipole interactions. It explains how to determine which molecule has a higher boiling point and which has a higher solubility in water. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEWpbFLzoYGPfuWUMFPSaoA?sub_confirmation=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ New Organic Chemistry Playlist https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6unef5Hz6SU&index=1&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BXP7TUO7656wg0uF1xYnwgm&t=0s
Water: Hydrogen Bonding & Biology | A-level Biology | OCR, AQA, Edexcel
 
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https://goo.gl/31T06Y to unlock the full series of AS, A2 & A-level Biology videos created by A* students for the new OCR, AQA and Edexcel specification. In this video we cover the molecular structure of water, polarity, hydrogen bonding and how this all comes together to create a very biologically important molecule - without which life wouldn’t exist on Earth. This will include talking through properties like cohesion, adhesion, surface tension, specific heat capacities and latent heat of vaporisation.
Views: 5150 SnapRevise
Hydrogen bonding (Inter & Intra) -IIT JEE Chemistry
 
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Types of Hydrogen Bonding - Inter as well as Intra
What Are Intermolecular Forces | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn what intermolecular forces are, the three most common types and the differences between them. An intermolecular force is simply an attractive force between neighbouring molecules. There are three common types of intermolecular force: permanent dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' forces. All these three forces are very much weaker than ionic or covalent bonds which bind atoms and ions together in elements and compounds. Permanent dipole-dipole forces: A polar molecule is one in which there is a permanent dipole, arising usually because the different atoms in the molecule have different electro-negativities. Hydrogen chloride is a polar molecule as the pair of electrons in the H---Cl bond are nearer the Cl atom because it has a greater electronegativity than the H atom. The two electrons of the covalent bond between the hydrogen and chlorine atoms are nearer the chlorine atom because of its greater electronegativity. Thus there will be an attraction between the chlorine atom of one molecule and the hydrogen atom of a neighbouring molecule. Hydrogen bonds: The second type of intermolecular force is the hydrogen bond. The permanent dipole in a covalent bond between a hydrogen atom and a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom is particularly strong. Thus the attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is much stronger than the permanent dipole-dipole attraction between the two hydrogen chloride molecules. This particular type of dipole-dipole attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is given the special name of hydrogen bond. Even though a hydrogen bond has only about 5% the strength of a covalent bond, it does have significant effects on the physical properties of compounds. Were it not for hydrogen bonds both water and alcohol would be gases at room temperature and pressure. Hydrogen bonds explain the lower volatility of alcohols compared to that of alkanes of similar molecular mass. van der Waals’ forces: van der Waals’ forces are induced dipole-dipole interactions. They arise out of movement of the electrons in the shells.These induced dipole-dipole interactions, called van der Waals’ forces occur in all molecules, whether polar or not, but are the only intermolecular forces between non-polar molecules such as the halogens and the noble gases. As the number of electrons in the molecule increases, so do the van der Waals’ forces. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Chemical Bonds
 
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This clip provides an overview of chemical bonds, explaining that a chemical bond is not a physical structure but an energy relationship that involves interactions between the electrons of the reacting atoms. The clip also discusses the various types of chemical bonds (ionic, covalent and hydrogen).
Views: 2427 INTELECOM
HYDROGEN BONDING {FULL CONCEPT} | IIT JEE | NEET | AIMS
 
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follow ne on unacademy for fully Explained video lectures https://unacademy.com/user/BharatPanchal-92
Water: A simple covalent substance with hydrogen bonds acting between molecules.
 
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Highly Recommended - Top Tutors for All Subjects at All Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry This short flash animation takes you down to a millionth of a millimetre to where you can see how water molecules behave. If water is colled to 0 Celsius it freezes. At that point the molecules have sufficiently low kinetic energy for the hydrogen bonds to hold the molecules together permanently.
Views: 916 FranklyChemistry
√ Bonding in carbon compounds | Energy | Chemistry
 
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#iitutor #Chemistry #Energy https://www.iitutor.com/ In organic compounds carbon atoms almost always form four bonds. This suggests that the carbon atom’s four valence electrons are all involved in bonding. An examination of simple carbon-base molecules like methane (CH4) and carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) indicates that in these compounds the carbon atom forms four identical single covalent bonds and that the angles between the bonds are 109.5 . It can be predicted from the valence shell electron pair is required to minimise the electrostatic repulsion between them. The central role of carbon in organic chemistry depends on the fact carbon atoms can form chains of virtually unlimited length containing a succession of carbon-carbons bonds. The valence electrons not involved in forming carbon-carbon bonds are used in forming bonds with atoms of other elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and halogens. The properties of carbon that allow it to form a huge number and variety of compounds include: • four outer shell valence electrons • can form single, double and triple bonds • can form chains and rings, which can be branched or unbranched • can share electrons with other non-metals Carbon atoms can bond to one another by single, double or triple covalent bonds. Lewis electron-dot diagrams do not show the spatial distribution of bonds in three dimensions. Carbon-carbon single bonds Single covalent bonds around a carbon atom are arranged tetrahedrally (bond angle=109.28 ). Methane is a good example of this arrangement of carbon-hydrogen single bonds. The two simplest molecules containing carbon-carbon single bonds are ethane (CH3CH3) and propane (CH 3CH2CH3). In these compounds each carbon atom forms four single bonds which again have a tetrahedral orientation. In the case of CH3CH3 three of the bonds formed by the carbon atoms are C-H bonds, while the other bond is a C-C bond. The length of the single C-C bond in these compounds has been found to be 0.154 nm. Carbon-carbon double bonds The compound ethene (CH2CH2) is the simplest carbon compound containing a C=C double bond. In this case only two of each carbon atom's four valence electrons are used in bonding with hydrogen atoms. Hence each carbon atom shares two pairs of electrons with another carbon atom. These two pairs of electrons constitute a double bond. The presence of one double covalent bond forces the bonding electrons into a planar arrangement (bond angle=120 ), so the structure of ethane (ethylene) is planar. An examination of compounds such as ethene (CH2CH2 ) indicates that the C=C bond length is 0.134 nm, the bond angles are 120°, and the geometric arrangement of the two carbon atoms and adjoining hydrogen atoms is planar. This again can be explained in terms of the VSEPR theory. In using the VSEPR theory the C=C double bond is viewed as a single region of charge. To minimise electron repulsion the three electron regions around each carbon atom adopt a planar orientation with bond angles of 120°.
Views: 5893 iitutor.com
Chemistry of energy,   covalent bonds.   hydrogen bonds, water and solubility, and  catalysts
 
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This lecture takes you through some applications of chemistry including some covalent bonding, hydrogen bonding and polarity, solubility, and the energy of chemical reactions including the concept of catalysts
Views: 184 Dr Greg
Ice: Hydrogen bonding holding water molecules in ice.
 
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Highly Recommended - Top Tutors for All Subjects at All Levels here: https://spires.co/franklychemistry This short animation takes you down to a millionth of a millimetre, where you can see how the molecules of water are held together in ice. Hydrogen bonds hold the molecules together: H-O-H ------- H-O-H -------- H-O-H
Views: 9815 FranklyChemistry
Water Molecules Introducing Hydrogen Bonds
 
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This video examines the high specific heat of water and the components of its hydrogen bonds. The water takes a while to boil for the pasta because water's hydrogen bonds are weak, temporary, and variable. These properties of water's hydrogen bonds are what is responsible for the delay in satisfying Aaron's hunger. Because of high specific heat, it takes water some time for it to heat up or cool down with a given amount of hot or cool energy. Aaron explains through song the dominate part hydrogen bonds play in the heating up of water.
Views: 600 GavensTeamS
Ice structure with thermal energy and showing hydrogen bonds
 
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Made from the Water Module in the VMD package from the University of Illinois.
Views: 369 Gregg Swackhamer
Polar & Non-Polar Molecules: Crash Course Chemistry #23
 
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*** PLEASE WATCH WITH ANNOTATIONS ON! SOME INACCURACIES IN GRAPHICS ARE NOTED AND CORRECTED IN ANNOTATIONS. THANKS! *** Molecules come in infinite varieties, so in order to help the complicated chemical world make a little more sense, we classify and categorize them. One of the most important of those classifications is whether a molecule is polar or non-polar, which describes a kind of symmetry - not just of the molecule, but of the charge. In this edition of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank comes out for Team Polar, and describes why these molecules are so interesting to him. You'll learn that molecules need to have both charge asymmetry and geometric asymmetry to be polar, and that charge asymmetry is caused by a difference in electronegativities. You'll also learn how to notate a dipole moment (or charge separation) of a molecule, the physical mechanism behind like dissolves like, and why water is so dang good at fostering life on Earth. -- Table of Contents Charge Assymetry & Geometric Asymmetry 01:33 Difference in Electronegatives 01:49 Hank is Team Polar 00:33 Dipole Moment 03:49 Charge Separation of a Molecule 04:12 Like Dissolves Like 04:41 Water is Awesome 05:10 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2480575 CrashCourse
Intermolecular Forces and Boiling Points
 
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Why do different liquids boil at different temperatures? It has to do with how strongly the molecules interact with each other. Find out all the different ways, and how to use them to make predictions about matter! To support this channel and keep up on STEM news at the same time, click on the link below and subscribe to this FREE newsletter: http://www.jdoqocy.com/click-9021241-13591026 Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 637415 Professor Dave Explains
03 Hydrogen Bonds
 
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In this lesson, hydrogen bonds are studied. The lesson proceeds then to explain some of the physical properties of water that can be attributed to hydrogen bonds.
Views: 470 Mindset Learn
Water: A Polar Molecule
 
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Water: A Polar Molecule In this video Paul Andersen explains how the polarity of water makes life on the planet possible. Oxygen is highly electronegative and pulls the electrons closely creating a partial negative charge. The polarity of water (and the corresponding hydrogen bonds) create cohesion, adhesion, capillary action, high specific heat, and a universally good solvent. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Adblocker. English: Table of Electronegatives, March 24, 2013. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Electronegative.jpg. Blacus, Victor. Two Phases (water and Oil) in the Same State of Aggregation (liquid)., September 2010. Victor Blacus. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Water_and_oil.jpg. "File:Blue Linckia Starfish.JPG." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 28, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Blue_Linckia_Starfish.JPG. "File:Bozeman MT Areal.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bozeman_MT_areal.jpg. "File:Downtown-Seattle.JPG." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Downtown-Seattle.JPG. "File:Hex ice.GIF." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hex_ice.GIF. "File:Surface Tension March 2009-3.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Surface_tension_March_2009-3.jpg. "File:Water-Elpot-Transparent-3D-Balls.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed February 27, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Water-elpot-transparent-3D-balls.png. H'arnet. Français : Niveau D'un Liquide Dans Un Ensemble de Tubes Capillaires Par Rapport Au Niveau de La Surface Libre Du Liquide Dans Des Tubes de Section Ne Faisant Pas Intervenir La Capillarité Appartenant Tous À Un Même Système de Vases Communicants., August 17, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capillarit%C3%A9.PNG. Jynto. Space-Filling Model of the Allolactose Molecule, a Disaccharide Similar to Lactose., June 9, 2011. Own work This chemical image was created with Discovery Studio Visualizer. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Allolactose-3D-spacefill.png. ———. Space-Filling Model of the Allolactose Molecule, a Disaccharide Similar to Lactose., June 9, 2011. Own work This chemical image was created with Discovery Studio Visualizer. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Allolactose-3D-spacefill.png. Kdv2754. English: A Ball and Stick Model of a Triglyceride Fat., September 31, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Triglyceride_ballandstick.GIF. Melgar, Michael. A Drop of Water Frozen by Flash, March 15, 2007. english wikipedia. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Michael_Melgar_LiquidArt_resize_droplet.jpg. MesserWoland. Deutsch: Kapillarität Am Beispiel von Wasser Und QuecksilberEnglish: CapillarityNederlands: CapillariteitTürkçe: Kılcallık, November 9, 2006. own work created in Inkscape, based on the graphics by Daniel Stiefelmaier. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Capillarity.svg. NASA. English: Astronaut Clayton Anderson Watches as a Water Bubble Floats in the Middeck of Space Shuttle Discovery during the STS-131 Mission. Note That His Image in the Bubble Is Upside down Because the Bubble Refracted the Light., April 12, 2010. www.nasa.gov : HTML : JPG. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Clayton_Anderson_zero_g_edit.jpg. NASA/JPL-Caltech. English: This Artist's Concept Shows a Simulated View from the Surface of Jupiter's Moon Europa. Europa's Potentially Rough, Icy Surface, Tinged with Reddish Areas That Scientists Hope to Learn More About, Can Be Seen in the Foreground. The Giant Planet Jupiter Looms over the Horizon., August 6, 2013. http://www.nasa.gov/centers/jpl/multimedia/pia17043.html#.UgLCUuig5w0. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:View_from_Europa%27s_Surface_(Artist%27s_Concept).jpg. Pallbo. English: Image of Sugarcubes Isolated on Black., November 3, 2007. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Sugarcubes.jpg. Riccio. Italiano: Molecole D'acqua Con Evidenziati I Legami a Idrogeno Ma Non I Momenti Di Dipolo)., January 4, 2014. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Molecole_d%27acqua.png. "Salts & Solubility." PhET. Accessed February 27, 2014. https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/soluble-salts.
Views: 351971 Bozeman Science
Hydrogen Bonds, Water, Acids and Bases 1
 
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Lecture 1 of 2 on Hydrogen Bonds, Water, Acids and Bases.
Views: 37 Professor Roth
Covalent Bonding | #aumsum
 
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Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.
Views: 1434752 It's AumSum Time
Popular Videos - Hydrogen bond & Water
 
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This short animation takes you down to a millionth of a millimetre, where you can see how the molecules of water are held together in ice. Hydrogen bonds hold . Why does Ice float? This lesson looks at the expansion of ice, as well as other properties of water, from a molecular perspective and intermolecular attractions. The structure of ice crystal has hexagonal shape with oxygen atoms arranged in a tetrahedral lattice. Each molecule of water is bound to its neighbor by means .
Views: 39 sevil atun
Why does ice float in water? - George Zaidan and Charles Morton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-does-ice-float-in-water-george-zaidan-and-charles-morton Water is a special substance for several reasons, and you may have noticed an important one right in your cold drink: ice. Solid ice floats in liquid water, which isn't true for most substances. But why? George Zaidan and Charles Morton explain the science behind how how hydrogen bonds keep the ice in your glass (and the polar ice caps) afloat. Lesson by George Zaidan and Charles Morton, animation by Powerhouse Animation Studios Inc.
Views: 812871 TED-Ed