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Search results “Academic science articles”
How to write a scientific paper
 
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Do you want to write and publish an academic or scientific paper? To get a paper published in a peer-reviewed journal is not difficult. This video will provide you with insights into what to include in each section of the paper and talk you through some of the best practices for writing. This video deals mostly with how to write up the results of quantitative research. The principles, however, apply to qualitative research too (with slightly different content in the methods section). You’ve done a study, you’ve collected and analysed the data. Now it’s time to write it up and get it published. This video was sponsored by BMC - https://www.biomedcentral.com This channel posts global health and public health teaching videos and videos about how to find the right job in global health. If you haven't already, please consider subscribing to this channel and becoming part of this community. SUBSCRIBE: -------------------- Click here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=YourChannelNameHere LETS CONNECT: --------------------------- Twitter: @drgregmartin Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drgregmartin/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thisweekinglobalhealth/ SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL ----------------------------------------- Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/drgregmartin
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w Hit the Join button above to sign up to become a member of my channel for access to exclusive content!
Views: 234296 Siraj Raval
How to Read and Comprehend Scientific Research Articles
 
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This tutorial will discuss how to read a scientific article, how to find the main points of the article, and how to take effective notes.
Views: 108866 umnLibraries
How to Read, Take Notes On and Understand Journal Articles | Essay Tips
 
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The first pilot to my Essay Tips series! I share my method for reading and understanding a journal article or paper quickly and efficiently including how to take good, concise notes and remember useful citations. If your method differs from mine or you think you can give me some pointers then let me know in the comments! This is the first in a series of videos I'm hoping to produce while undertaking my PhD at the University of Exeter on tips for students at university or college whether undergraduate, postgraduate or otherwise. Note: The programme to the left (which I highlight in) is Mendeley. Apologies for forgetting to state this in the video!! If you've enjoyed this video then please do check out the rest of my channel. I generally put out new videos every Tuesday and Friday discussing theatre and playwriting from the perspective of an aspirant and (some might say) emerging playwright, theatre maker and academic. My tagging system was borrowed from this article on The Thesis Whisperer: https://thesiswhisperer.com/2015/10/28/how-evernote-can-help-you-with-your-literature-review/ Further Reading The Academic Skills Handbook by Diana Hopkins and Tom Reid US: https://amzn.to/2NBDAnf UK: https://amzn.to/2NBJIfb The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell US: https://amzn.to/2NDeIvh UK: https://amzn.to/2OTyneu [The above are affiliate links. I receive a small kickback from anything you buy which, in turn, helps to support the channel.]
Views: 72583 Tom Nicholas
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 1998423 Veritasium
How to Read a Paper Efficiently (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Pete Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) shares an algorithm to read a scientific paper more efficiently. One might start reading the paper in the order in which it is written, for example, title, abstract, introduction, etc., however, there is a more efficient method to extract the most information from the article, in the least amount of time.
The Shortest Ever Papers - Numberphile
 
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Audible 30-day free trial: http://www.audible.com/numberphile (sponsor) Tony Padilla discusses some of the shortest math papers to be published. From Conway to Nash. More links & stuff in full description below ↓↓↓ Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/numberphile NUMBERPHILE Website: http://www.numberphile.com/ Numberphile on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/numberphile Numberphile tweets: https://twitter.com/numberphile Subscribe: http://bit.ly/Numberphile_Sub Numberphile is supported by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI): http://bit.ly/MSRINumberphile Videos by Brady Haran Brady's videos subreddit: http://www.reddit.com/r/BradyHaran/ Brady's latest videos across all channels: http://www.bradyharanblog.com/ Sign up for (occasional) emails: http://eepurl.com/YdjL9 Numberphile T-Shirts: https://teespring.com/stores/numberphile Other merchandise: https://store.dftba.com/collections/numberphile
Views: 1346884 Numberphile
How to Write a Paper in a Weekend (By Prof. Pete Carr)
 
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In this video, Prof. Carr (faculty member at the University of Minnesota, Department of Chemistry) is explaining the Algorithm of writing a paper in a weekend.
PhD: How to write a great research paper
 
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Writing papers and giving talks are key skills for any researcher, but they arenΓÇÖt easy. In this pair of presentations, IΓÇÖll describe simple guidelines that I follow for writing papers and giving talks, which I think may be useful to you too. I donΓÇÖt have all the answersΓÇöfar from itΓÇöand I hope that the presentation will evolve into a discussion in which you share your own insights, rather than a lecture.
Views: 80359 Microsoft Research
How Open-Access Journals Are Transforming Science
 
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Academic publishers are locking up the latest research behind paywalls and hurting science, says Michael Eisen. We spoke with the co-founder of the Public Library of Science about democratizing scientific progress. Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/reasontv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reason.Magazine/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/reason Subscribe to our podcast at iTunes: https://goo.gl/az3a7a Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Go to reason.com for a point of view you won't get from legacy media and old left-right opinion magazines. ---------------- Michael Eisen's goal is to change the way scientific findings are disseminated. Most research papers today are locked behind paywalls, and access can cost hundreds of dollars per article. The general public, and most scientists, don't have comprehensive access to the most up-to-date research, even though much of it is funded by U.S. taxpayers. "It's a completely ridiculous system," says Eisen, an acclaimed biologist at UC Berkeley, an independent candidate for Senate in California running against Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D), and a co-founder of the Public Library of Science, or PLOS, which publishes some of the largest and most prestigious academic journals in the world. These publications stand out for another reason: They're open access, meaning that anyone with an internet connection can read them for free. PLOS seeks to break up the academic publishing cartel, and it's a leading force in the so-called open science movement, which aims to give the public access to cutting-edge research and democratize scientific progress. This movement became widely publicized after famed hacker and Reddit co-founder Aaron Swartz sought to upend the publishing system by uploading millions of articles for free; he was prosecuted relentlessly, and ultimately committed suicide in 2013. Eisen first thought he could simply convince his fellow scientists to start uploading their work, but that didn't work because universities and funding agencies use journals as a proxy for quality. They base tenure and award decisions in large part on how many articles a researcher publishes, and on the reputations of the publishers. To encourage a switch in researchers' thinking, PLOS's first journal, PLOS Biology, attempted to emulate what Eisen describes as the "snooty" journals such as Science and Nature, which generate prestige in part by rejecting most submitted papers. PLOS Biology became well regarded and provided a proof of concept for PLOS's model, in which funding agencies or universities pay a flat fee up front (typically $1,500, but adjusted based on ability to pay) that's then made accessible for free. The multidisciplinary journal PLOS ONE, created in 2006, used this same model to become the largest academic publication in the world, though it's been surpassed by other open access sources. PLOS ONE puts papers through a fairly typical peer review process, but it doesn't ask editors to determine a paper's importance; the journal will publish any study that follows sound science and reports its data. According to Eisen, this model encourages more thorough experiments, rather than flashy results that aren't reproducible, and allows readers to determine whether a particular study is important and valid. Reason spoke with Eisen at the BioHack the Planet Conference in Oakland, a gathering for DIY scientists known as biohackers who eschew traditional research institutions. They often carry out experiments in garage labs and share their raw findings on the internet in real time, a publishing model to which Eisen believes all scientists should aspire. Eisen also discussed why scientists and universities continue to prop up the academic publishing monopoly, how scientific progress suffers from the current regime, why he's running for senate as an independent, why he beleives political parties are obsolete, and the way forward for the open science movement. Produced by Justin Monticello. Cameras by Alexis Garcia and Monticello. Music by Silent Partner (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ha94-6CQdo0), Vibe Tracks (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-fPJLhcato), and MK2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2GRv3HYpoU).
Views: 14266 ReasonTV
What to think about before you start to write a journal article
 
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Discover the four A’s with editor Professor David Simon, as he offers advice on what to think about before you start to write an article. About us: Taylor & Francis Group partners with world-class authors, from leading scientists and researchers, to scholars and professionals operating at the top of their fields. Together, we publish in all areas of the Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, Technology and Medicine sectors. We are one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, eBooks, text books and reference works. For more author insights follow us at: https://www.facebook.com/tandfauthorservices https://twitter.com/tandfauthorserv https://www.linkedin.com/company/taylor-&-francis-group To browse our 2600+ journals visit: http://www.tandfonline.com And learn more about Informa at: https://informa.com/
Views: 71880 Taylor & Francis
Reading academic articles
 
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Click on 'Captions' for English subtitles. For more help with reading look here: http://elc.polyu.edu.hk/cill/reading/ https://www.lib.polyu.edu.hk/ Narrator: Chan Man Writer: Fiona Luk Film editors: Fiona Luk and Keenan Manning Made using Powtoon: http://www.powtoon.com/ For more help with your English visit CILL: ★ Online: https://elc.polyu.edu.hk/cill/ ★ In person at A305 and Z213 ★ Map: http://elc.polyu.edu.hk/images/campus_map.jpg Created by the English Language Centre of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. http://elc.polyu.edu.hk/ http://www.polyu.edu.hk/web/en/home/index.html R4
Views: 45160 PolyU ELC
Peer Review in 3 Minutes
 
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How do articles get peer reviewed? What role does peer review play in scholarly research and publication? This video will explain. This video is published under a Creative Commons 3.0 BY-NC-SA US license. License, credits, and contact information can be found here: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/tutorials/peerreview/ Feel free to link to / embed our videos!
Views: 283776 libncsu
All Scientific Papers Should Be Free; Here's Why They're Not
 
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Have you ever tried to access scientific research but the website says you have to pay? Why is that? Shouldn't information be free? Who Pays For Science? - https://youtu.be/L7oklmbtxoY Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: Who Pick Up the Tab for Science? http://www.bu.edu/research/articles/funding-for-scientific-research/ "Scientists say that much of the public-and many politicians-do not have a general understanding of the scientific process, knowledge critical for smart decision-making in our increasingly technological society." Peer Review at Science Publications http://www.sciencemag.org/authors/peer-review-science-publications "For in-depth review, at least two outside referees are consulted. Reviewers are contacted before being sent a paper and are asked to return comments within 1 to 2 weeks for most papers. Reviewers may be selected to evaluate separate components of a manuscript." Vestiges of print publications in scientific journals https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/information-culture/vestiges-of-print-publication-in-scientific-journals/ "The first scientific journals were published in the late 17th century, and these print publications changed very little over time. Developments in printing technology, distribution and the advent of the commercial publisher all impacted the process, but the basic form was easily recognizable." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+dnews Seeker http://www.seeker.com/ Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Written By: Trace Dominguez
Views: 154201 Seeker
How to read a scientific paper
 
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Reading a scientific paper can be quite a daunting task, but I've recently come across a technique that makes reading and understanding these papers a lot easier! Music: Before I Sleep by Muciojad https://soundcloud.com/muciojad Let's Party by HookSounds http://www.hooksounds.com/ ----------|---------- I am Chantel Elston, a second year marine biology PhD student. Join me on my journey as I discover our wonderful oceans and try to survive PhD life. twitter: @chantel3474 instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tellysmarinetales/?hl=en
Views: 15541 Telly'sMarineTales
Using Articles (a, an, the) in Academic Writing
 
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The articles "a," "an," and "the") are constantly used in both everyday speaking and writing and in academic writing. However, knowing which articles to use in different contexts in academic writing can be difficult. This video will explore the different usages of articles as they might appear in a research paper. This video includes: ✔ Basic rules about using definite and indefinite articles ✔ Example sentences for correct article usage ✔ A quiz to check your ability to use articles in sample sentences Video Outline: 1. Two basic rules for using indefinite articles 2. Three basic rules for using definite articles 3. A breakdown of countable and uncountable nouns 4. Sample sentences showing correct usage of these articles 5. An article practice quiz Who should watch this video: ★Anyone engaged in academic writing (university or research writing) ★Those who are unsure of their ability to use articles correctly For more useful writing tips, check out these posts on our “Resources” page: “How to Correctly Use Articles (a, an, the) in Your Writing”: https://wordvice.com/how-to-correctly-use-articles-a-an-the-in-your-writing/ “100+ Strong Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing”: https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/ Follow these links for more helpful tips available in several languages: ENGLISH SITE: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Writing a Scientific Literature Review / Academic Writing
 
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Tips and guidance for writing a scientific literature review. This screencast video combines work and comments from a DkIT graduate with overview comments from Dr. Ronan Bree, lecturer at Dundalk Institute of Technology. Many thanks to the student for allowing their work to be used as an exemplar (please note the student wished to remain anonymous).
Views: 6707 Bree Bio
How to use Google Scholar to find journal articles | Essay Tips
 
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My second essay tips video. Conducting a comprehensive literature review is an important part of any research project. Here are my tips for how to use Google Scholar effectively to quickly and easily find the academic papers, journal articles or books you need to write that essay or complete that dissertation. This is the second in a series of videos I'm hoping to produce while undertaking my PhD at the University of Exeter on tips for students at university or college whether undergraduate, postgraduate or otherwise. Further Reading The Academic Skills Handbook by Diana Hopkins and Tom Reid US: https://amzn.to/2NBDAnf UK: https://amzn.to/2NBJIfb The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell US: https://amzn.to/2NDeIvh UK: https://amzn.to/2OTyneu [The above are affiliate links. I receive a small kickback from anything you buy which, in turn, helps to support the channel.] If you've enjoyed this video and would like to see more including my What The Theory? series in which I provide some snappy introductions to key theories in the humanities as well as PhD vlogs in which I talk about some of the challenges of being a PhD student then do consider subscribing. Thanks for watching! Twitter: @Tom_Nicholas Website: www.tomnicholas.com
Views: 68136 Tom Nicholas
Improving Research Writing for Publication (Full Lecture)
 
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*Presentation by Kevin Heintz, Wordvice Content Manager/Senior Editor, at the annual convention of the Transplantation Society of Taiwan on 3 November, 2017. What Does “Quality of Writing” Mean and Why is It Important in Manuscripts? In the world of clinical and scientific research, rejection by journals is the norm rather than the exception. Almost all researchers who write manuscripts will receive rejection letters from journals, especially in the beginning stages of their careers, and thus rejection should be seen as a learning experience rather than something to be dejected about. This reality raises the question all researchers must ask themselves: “Why are my manuscripts being rejected?” And from a wider perspective: “What are so many manuscripts so often rejected?” One likely answer to this question is that there is a deficiency in “quality of writing” in a great many manuscripts. This can lead not only to rejections, but to continued requests for revision and resubmission (if the research itself is deemed significant and valid), as well as deferment, costing researchers extra time, money, and effort. While there is endless excellent research being conducted at any given time, the manuscripts that get published will combine novelty, relevancy, impact, and other scientific parameters of a good manuscript with another parameter whose importance is often overlooked: “quality of writing.” This is the topic of my presentation today. This video includes: ✔ A comprehensive overview of common problems with “quality of writing” in research papers submitted to journals ✔ Graphics and slides from studies that breakdown the errors in content, grammar, and style derived from millions of edited words in research papers ✔ Tips and suggestions for authors in eliminating these errors prior to submitting their manuscripts Who should watch this video: ★Research writers writing a paper for a journal or conference ★Students interested in learning how to edit their work For more useful writing tips, check out these posts on our “Resources” page: “How to Write the Best Journal Submissions Cover Letter" https://wordvice.com/journal-submissi... “100+ Strong Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing” “How to Write an Abstract” “Which Tense to Use in Your Absract” Wordvice Journal Submissions Page https://wordvice.com/category/journal... Join Wordvice on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Wordvice/ Tweet @ us on Twitter: @WordviceEditing Wordvice offers services in other languages and countries: ENGLISH SITE: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
How To Read an Academic/Scientific Paper
 
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Papers We Love Raleigh Durham Chapter First session was on how to read an academic/scientific paper. We went over the articles provided in https://github.com/papers-we-love/papers-we-love and discussed the suggestions from the articles and the video on specific techniques on reading academic papers.
Views: 1330 PapersWeLove
How To Read a Scholarly Journal Article
 
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Recognize the structure of scholarly articles in order to use them most effectively in your research projects. With Tim Lockman, Kishwaukee College librarian.
Finding online sources for your research paper
 
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This video explains how to use google scholar to find research papers to use as the background of your experiment and as sources in your paper. Table of Contents: 00:08 - Types of sources 01:45 - Google Scholar 03:10 - Dowloading PDFs 04:10 - Using reference lists 05:25 - Using the "cited by" link 06:20 - Refining your search terms and using operators 07:50 - Using Wikipedia 08:55 - Using Science Daily
Views: 120560 Steve Kirk
Women in Academic Science: A Changing Landscape
 
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The authors of a comprehensive analysis of women in academic science (published in November 2014 in the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest) talk about their study, highlighting key findings and especially, what has changed in the last 15 years for women in the math-based fields of math, computer science, engineering, economics, and physics, and the non-math-based fields of biology, psychology, and social sciences.
Views: 2697 womeninscience1
Finding Articles in Academic Databases
 
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Hey there Bruins! Ready to get the most out of your article search? This tutorial will help you successfully navigate search filters, construct the effective searches, and download full texts of your articles! Visit our website for more research and writing tips from your friends at WI+RE: https://uclalibrary.github.io/research-tips/ Visit our website for more research and writing tips from your friends at WI+RE: https://uclalibrary.github.io/research-tips/
Views: 2034 UCLA Library
How to Write the Academic Critique Assignment--Critique of Academic Journal Article
 
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Review of a model APA paper for the critique and presentation assignment of PSYC 334, Summer 2014.
Views: 101119 David Taylor
Joe Rogan Experience #1191 - Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay
 
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Peter Boghossian is a philosophy instructor, activist, author, speaker, and atheism advocate. He is a full-time faculty member at Portland State University. James Lindsay has a Ph.D. in mathematics and a background in physics and is also the author of three books.
Views: 1379390 PowerfulJRE
How to Access Research Articles for Free
 
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The “Robin Hood of Science” continues to provide 60+ million scientific papers to anyone in the world for free at https://sci-hub.tw Subscribe to Dr. Greger’s free nutrition newsletter and get the Evidence-Based Eating Guide: A Healthy Living Resource from Dr. Greger and NutritionFacts.org. Sign up at https://www.nutritionfacts.org/healthkit. Sci-hub.io was shut down since I recorded this, but the site can currently be reached at https://sci-hub.tw/ and five other domains. Should that one get yanked too (can always see the updated active link list on the Sci-Hub Wikipedia page(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sci-Hub)). Links provided for educational purposes only—literally! But wait, isn’t illegal to download “pirated” papers? I explore the controversy in the thrilling conclusion of this two-part video series in Sci-Hub Opens Up a World of Knowledge (http://nutritionfacts.org/video/Sci-Hub-Opens-Up-a-World-of-Knowledge) up next. My research into Sci-Hub came from a whole webinar I did on research techniques, which was captured into an online Continuing Medical Education course through the American College of Lifestyle Medicine. Check it out at How to be an Evidence-based Lifestyle Medicine Practitioner (https://www.lifestylemed.education/Course/view/624278). I’m hoping to have a whole series of courses coming soon—stay tuned! Have a question about this video? Leave it in the comment section at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-access-research-articles-for-free and someone on the NutritionFacts.org team will try to answer it. Want to get a list of links to all the scientific sources used in this video? Click on Sources Cited at http://nutritionfacts.org/video/how-to-access-research-articles-for-free. You’ll also find a transcript and acknowledgments for the video, my blog and speaking tour schedule, and an easy way to search (by translated language even) through our videos spanning more than 2,000 health topics. If you’d rather watch these videos on YouTube, subscribe to my YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=nutritionfactsorg Thanks for watching. I hope you’ll join in the evidence-based nutrition revolution! -Michael Greger, MD FACLM Captions for this video are available in several languages. To find yours, click on the settings wheel on the lower-right of the video and then "Subtitles/CC." To view the subtitles in transcript format, click on the ellipsis button below the video, choose "Open transcript", and select the language you'd like to view them in. http://www.NutritionFacts.org • Subscribe: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/subscribe • Donate: http://www.NutritionFacts.org/donate • HOW NOT TO DIE: http://nutritionfacts.org/book • Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NutritionFacts.org • Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nutrition_facts • Instagram: http://instagram.com/nutrition_facts_org/ • Podcast : http://nutritionfacts.org/audio/
Views: 50068 NutritionFacts.org
How to Search Academic Databases for Research Papers
 
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How to research for a paper using academic databases and academic journals. We look at what is an academic journal and a peer-reviewed journal, what search terms to use, how to choose what databases to search, etc. This is great for research papers for university and college. FILMING SETUP: Canon 70D: http://amzn.to/2u0QXCn Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Lens for Canon: http://amzn.to/2tGBw2T Rode VideoMic Pro with Rycote Lyre Shockmount: http://amzn.to/2rNQymg Manfrotto 055XPRO3 Tripod: http://amzn.to/2sNS6hj SUBSCRIBE! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChcKv9cp3oXkXRl6iN6k-tA?sub_confirmation=1 Find Me Here: INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/barbaravance1/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/barbara_vance WEBSITE: http://www.barbaravance.com/ MY BOOK: http://www.suziebitner.com/ Help translate videos! If you are up for helping share these videos in other languages, please click this link and add your translations. It means *a lot* Thank you!! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UCOTY5ueDUQIRtSYG0On-fvg Disclaimer: This is not a paid-for advertisement. I purchased all products. Some links may contain affiliate links. This means that if you click on an affiliate link, go through to the retailer and purchase an item, I may receive a small percentage of your purchase.
Views: 1681 Words with Barbara
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 15014132 LastWeekTonight
Academic Self Efficacy: How to read a science journal article (3/6)
 
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How do I read science journal articles? This video explains one professor's perspective on these questions and more. (Part 3 of a series of 6) Videos made by Clarissa Sorensen-Unruh on CNM Glass.
Views: 67 C. Sorensen-Unruh
How to Write for Academic Journal?
 
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ISET Policy Institute Dr. Randall Filer, Hunter College, the City University of New York - discusses Dos and Don'ts of writing for academic journals. This video is best for people who are looking for some tips in academic writing - especially those who are aiming their papers to high-end journals.
Views: 25446 ISETchannel
Joe Rogan - Exposing Social Justice with Peter Boghossian & James Lindsay
 
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Taken from Joe Rogan Experience #1191: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AZZNvT1vaJg
Views: 1032632 JRE Clips
How to Write a Research Paper Introduction
 
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After the title page and abstract, the reader’s first true interaction with your research paper is the introduction. Your introduction will establish the foundation upon which your readers approach your work, and if you use the tips we discuss in this video, these readers should be able to logically apply the rules set in your Introduction to all parts of your paper, all the way through the conclusion. This video includes: ✔ Content you need to include in the Introduction ✔ The order of information and exposition ✔ Writing tips checklist for writing a stronger introduction Video Outline: 1. What is the purpose of the Introduction? 2. How do I structure my introduction? 3. What content needs to be included? 4. When should I draft the Introduction? 5. Introduction writing dos and don’ts Who should watch this video: ★Researchers planning to write a manuscript ★Those planning to submit their work to scientific journals Links: ENGLISH SITE: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Views: 126062 Wordvice Editing Service
Best Journal for your research article/paper | Elsevier, Springer and IEEE
 
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This video suggest you to best journal for your article. The following links will help you. http://journalfinder.elsevier.com/ http://www.springer.com/?SGWID=0-102-12-988548-0 http://publication-recommender.ieee.org/
Views: 24372 Scientific Rana
Making a better research poster
 
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8 tips for creating a great research poster for a conference, from the Poster Illustration team at AJE. Visit our Author Resource Center for publishing tips: https://www.aje.com/en/arc/. Learn about poster preparation for your research at: https://www.aje.com/us/services/posters.
Editing: Things they don't tell you about what journal editors want
 
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Pippa Smart, independent publishing and research communications consultant and Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Learned Publishing, provides some insights into the ‘black box’ of editorial decision-making and how authors can improve their chances of article acceptance. Recorded 6 July 2016 at a MedComms Networking event in Oxford. Produced by NetworkPharma.tv = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = ABSTRACT: Many authors are mystified both by the time it takes to publish work, and by the reasons for its being rejected or accepted only subject to revisions. The process of publication is actually straightforward. Following initial checks for completeness, suitability and plagiarism, high-impact journals tend to reject 70% or more of papers immediately, i.e. within a week or so, while those with less strict criteria will reject at least 30% of submissions. The commonest reasons are that the work is out of scope of the journal, or the quality is insufficient for a variety of reasons, from lack of originality, to flawed science and poor quality writing or overall structure. The review process is generally very time-consuming. It is standard practice to have three reviewers per article; one or two may be suggested by the authors, though not necessarily accepted. Recruiting these reviewers may require eight or more invitations. An editor will normally allow two weeks for review; however, deadlines are frequently missed, and the reviews received may be contradictory or unhelpful, necessitating a further round of reviewer recruitment or sometimes arbitration by an additional reviewer. Acceptance without changes following review is rare; the most common decision by an editor is to request revisions, which may be minor or major. Authors can greatly improve their chances of acceptance by carefully reading journal author guidelines, checking journal scopes to ensure that they submit to a suitable journal, and submitting good quality work. A good article will be attractive to a journal editor, communicate its message clearly and concisely, and encourage citation. Written by Penny Gray, Freelance Medical Writer = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = We are building a library of free webcasts, like this one, for the global MedComms Community and others at http://www.networkpharma.tv and we’d welcome your suggestions for new topics and speakers. Full details of this MedComms Networking event are at http://medcommsnetworking.com/event75.html Pippa’s presentation (PDF format) is at http://medcommsnetworking.com/presentations/smart_02_060716.pdf Pippa’s Linkedin page is at https://www.linkedin.com/in/pippa-smart-2b6b2a2/ More about PSP Consulting can be found at http://www.pspconsulting.org Filming and technical direction by Mario Crispino, Freelance Cameraman & Editor [For the avoidance of doubt: this video is intended to be freely accessible to all. Please feel free to share and use however you like. Cheers Peter Llewellyn, Director NetworkPharma Ltd and Founder of the MedComms Networking Community activity at http://www.medcommsnetworking.com]
Views: 16424 MedComms
How to Read and Use an Academic Paper
 
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This video uses two actual academic papers having to do with "What is an Emotion?" and helps the learner to "get right to the applied point" when reading usually long-winded and jargon-laced technical papers and research papers. Using humor, and challenging the papers, but also showing how they can be relevant, Dr. Zeus hopes to save learners a lot of frustration!
Stossel: Academic Hoax
 
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Journals applaud seven outrageously fake papers. --------- Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://youtube.com/reasontv Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reason.Magaz... Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/reason Subscribe to our podcast at iTunes: https://goo.gl/az3a7a Reason is the planet's leading source of news, politics, and culture from a libertarian perspective. Go to reason.com for a point of view you won't get from legacy media and old left-right opinion magazines. --------- Three academics conducted what they call a "grievance studies" experiment. They wrote fake papers on ridiculous subjects and submitted them to prominent academic journals in fields that study gender, race, and sexuality. They did this to "expose a political corruption that has taken hold of the universities," say the hoaxers in a video which documented the process. John Stossel interviewed James Lindsay and Peter Boghossian who, along with Helen Pluckrose, sent so-called research papers to 20 journals. They were surprised when seven papers were accepted. One claimed that "dog humping incidents at dog parks" can be taken as "evidence of rape culture." It was honored as "excellent scholarship." Another paper rewrote a section of Adolf Hitler's Mein Kampf as intersectional feminism. Stossel assumed that the journals would apologize for publishing nonsense and question the quality of their scholarship. But instead they criticized the the hoaxers, complaining that they "engaged in flawed and unethical research." Of course, that was the point of the hoax. Boghossian is unapologetic, telling Stossel the hoax shows "scholarship in these disciplines is utterly corrupted … they have placed an agenda before the truth." When Stossel suggests, "maybe you are just conservative hacks looking to defend your white privilege." Lindsay replied "I've never voted for a Republican in my life." Boghossian added, "Nor have I." Stossel says what upsets him is that after the hoax "no university said 'we're not gonna use these journals' and no editor publicly said, 'we have to raise our standards.'" Instead, Portland State University began disciplinary procedures against Boghossian. The views expressed in this video are solely those of John Stossel; his independent production company, Stossel Productions; and the people he interviews. The claims and opinions set forth in the video and accompanying text are not necessarily those of Reason.
Views: 106071 ReasonTV
Reading Scientific Journals
 
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This is a 23 minute overview of how to read the scientific literature. While this podcast is focused on computational chemistry, it can be applied to many disciplines.
Views: 45992 Bob Gotwals
How to Find Free Academic Articles Online | Spotting Scholarly Sources
 
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How to Find Academic Articles A Partial Perspective This video explains exactly how you can find academic articles and other scholarly sources without having to subscribe to an expensive journal! Very useful information for students and anybody else hoping to get scientific articles for free. We use these same techniques to find articles for all of our own videos. Enjoy! ---------------------------------------- Chat with a partial perspective on Facebook: https://goo.gl/qGfff6 Twitter: https://goo.gl/8JhikZ Instagram: https://goo.gl/gcK6mZ Topics: Spotting scholarly sources how to find academic articles on google how to find scholarly articles finding academic sources academic writing search for research papers
Views: 1764 A Partial Perspective
How to Write an Abstract Step-by-Step (With Examples)
 
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How to Write an Abstract. Once you’re done with your academic paper after months of hard work, you’ll also need to create an abstract of your paper, too. Since this writing summarizes and represents your work, you’ll want it to be picture perfect, right? Lucky for you, we’ve put together some tips on writing the best abstract, so pay close attention! TIMESTAMPS Find out the requirements 0:55 Pick the right abstract type 1:42 Consider your readers 3:27 Explain the importance of your research 4:10 Explain the problem and your methods 4:45 Avoid copy-pasting 5:19 Keep it well-structured and logical 6:15 Include key phrases and words 7:00 Sum it up 7:49 Editing and proofreading 8:18 Music: https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music SUMMARY -Whether you’re writing it to apply for a conference, grant, journal publication, or work project, find out if there are any specific requirements regarding its length and style. -When it comes to abstract types, you have two options to choose from: descriptive versus informative. Normally, descriptive abstracts are written for shorter papers, and informative ones for longer more technical pieces. -Fellow scholars from the same research field will easily get the ideas and special terminology you use, while average readers or people from another scientific field probably won’t grasp complicated concepts. -As you get down to actually writing the abstract, there are four key points you wanna hit when explaining the importance of your research to your readers. -It’s really important to define the scope of your research. It’s imperative that your research has a key claim or argument, which is definitely worth mentioning in the abstract. -Your abstract should be an independent piece of writing and not a collage of disconnected paraphrased sentences. -No matter how short it has to be, your abstract should be built according to the usual essay model and have an introduction, body, and conclusion. -If you want your prospective readers to be able to find your work among millions of publications, adding 5 to 10 important key words or phrases to your abstract will certainly help. -An informative abstract should explain what answers the research helped you find and if it supported your original argument. -Check your abstract several times for grammar and spelling, and don’t forget to format it the right way. Another pair of eyes won’t hurt either. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 113459 BRIGHT SIDE
How To Read a Scientific Research Paper: Extracting the Essentials
 
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Abstract PhD students or researchers starting a new research project or initiating work in an unfamiliar research direction often undertake a scientific literature search in order to inform themselves with respect to a chosen topic. This start-up phase involves wading through and reading scores, if not hundreds, of research papers that have already been published in the area of interest. Reading a large quantity of scientific papers and capturing the essential information from them is a very challenging task. Furthermore, this difficulty only increases with the passage of time as the complexity of literature increases as well as the quantity of publications. This lecture aims to instruct a starting PhD candidate or researcher on how to read a scientific research paper. By “read” we mean extracting the essential, most important information from a (previously) published scientific conference or journal paper. During the course of a PhD, the candidate will read many research papers containing a vast amount of information. However, it is not possible to remember all of the details presented, nor is it necessary. Here we identify and describe the essential knowledge that is best extracted and summarized when reading a research paper. Robert S. Laramee, How to Read a Visualization Research Paper: Extracting the Essentials, IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications (IEEE CG&A), Vol. 31, No. 3, May/June 2011, pages 78-82 PDF http://cs.swan.ac.uk/~csbob/research/how2read/laramee09how2read.pdf DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/MCG.2011.44 Connect with DataVis Bob on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/datavisbob Here is a version of the talk with slides: https://youtu.be/Q7ruNLUEMFg And yet another one with slides: https://youtu.be/IUlHgORKyQE
Views: 14247 DataVisBob Laramee
The Mein Kampf Rewrite in the Academic Journal Hoax
 
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PERSPECTIVES | An trio of academics submitted several arguably nonsensical papers to feminist and gender studies publications as a hoax to prove the weakening of discipline in the world academia. None may stand out more, though, than their use of Mein Kampf ideas in one of their papers and its acceptance. Our Ariel Levin-Waldman has the story. For more, see our ⬇ Website Articles: https://www.i24news.tv/en Live: https://video.i24news.tv/page/live?clip=5a94117623eec6000c557fec (Subscription) Replay: https://video.i24news.tv/page/5a97bcc4a0e845000b902b26 (Subscription) Social Media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/i24newsEN/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/i24NEWS_EN Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/i24news/
Views: 7582 i24NEWS English
Writing scientific articles is like making pizza
 
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Prof. Rodger Kram from the University of Colorado at Boulder leads students through the process of writing an academic paper by comparing it to making a pizza. Please note that the first 2 minutes of the webinar were not recorded.
7 Ways to Spruce Up Your Cooking with Science
 
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Your kitchen really is your own personal science lab, so here are some science-based cooking tricks to make tastier, healthier, and awesomer meals. #kitchen #science #cooking Build your own website today at https://wix.com/go/scishow Hosted by: Stefan Chin SciShow has a spinoff podcast! It's called SciShow Tangents. Check it out at http://www.scishowtangents.org ---------- Support SciShow by becoming a patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Huge thanks go to the following Patreon supporters for helping us keep SciShow free for everyone forever: Adam Brainard, Greg, Alex Hackman, Sam Lutfi, D.A. Noe, الخليفي سلطان, Piya Shedden, KatieMarie Magnone, Scott Satovsky Jr, Charles Southerland, Patrick D. Ashmore, charles george, Kevin Bealer, Chris Peters ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow ---------- Sources: Beer Bread https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03266.x https://www.jamieoliver.com/features/baking-beer-bread/ https://phys.org/news/2014-05-difference-soda-powder.html Mushroom Tacos https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666316302471 https://scholarworks.umass.edu/masters_theses_2/487/ https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1750-3841.13838 https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1750-3841.12549 https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/130/4/921S/4686627 Coconut oil and Chill https://health.usnews.com/health-news/blogs/eat-run/2015/04/21/does-the-calorie-slashing-method-for-cooking-rice-really-work https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/pressroom/newsreleases/2015/march/new-low-calorie-rice-could-help-cut-rising-obesity-rates.html https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/1541-4337.12143 https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/03/25/scientists-have-figured-out-a-simple-way-to-cook-rice-that-dramatically-cuts-the-calories/?utm_term=.f4463d10052b http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/24/4/620.pdf https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/star.201600203 https://www.cabdirect.org/cabdirect/abstract/20003030024 Safe raw cookie dough https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1046/j.1365-2672.1997.00253.x https://www.internationalegg.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/James%20-%202002.pdf https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/66/wr/mm6615a1.htm https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563394/ Artichoke Sweet water https://www.nature.com/articles/nature04765 https://science.sciencemag.org/content/178/4064/988 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paul_Breslin/publication/6217748_Visions_Reflections_Minireview/links/0deec51630f149f660000000.pdf https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0031938416301019 Temperature and Taste https://academic.oup.com/chemse/article/40/6/391/298823 https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/glossopharyngeal-nerve https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/chorda-tympani https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00018-006-6384-0.pdf Shortening vs Butter Cookies http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/flash/2010/issue79/ https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13197-017-2942-8 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/222534485_Effect_of_fat-type_on_cookie_dough_and_cookie_quality ------ Images: https://tinyurl.com/yywb8pq2 https://tinyurl.com/y2yqk5ns https://tinyurl.com/yxznpp3b https://tinyurl.com/yyf5gztl https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pasteur_Pipets.jpg https://tinyurl.com/y6o3l8vc https://tinyurl.com/y4xn7bo4 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Saccharomyces_cerevisiae_SEM.jpg https://tinyurl.com/y3g9ghue https://tinyurl.com/y32psoz5 https://tinyurl.com/y5c46p9c https://tinyurl.com/yyhepcy3 https://tinyurl.com/y6fseybu https://tinyurl.com/y566qcsm https://tinyurl.com/y4ch4umg https://tinyurl.com/y3j53kym https://tinyurl.com/y2lxmzrf https://tinyurl.com/y37vh4bx https://tinyurl.com/y4l4s9v8 https://tinyurl.com/y6p7td8h https://tinyurl.com/y6bh8u3u https://tinyurl.com/y2adkooc https://tinyurl.com/y66gydo7 https://tinyurl.com/y5qdzfee https://tinyurl.com/yxwhatpo https://tinyurl.com/y55wqn3b https://tinyurl.com/yxdpd5wh https://tinyurl.com/yym4j98a https://tinyurl.com/y2lc8khp https://tinyurl.com/y6j8qdbm https://tinyurl.com/yy3zrqka https://tinyurl.com/y69v3d74 https://tinyurl.com/yyv3pvvf https://tinyurl.com/y5da6b8k https://tinyurl.com/yxhawswz https://tinyurl.com/y2ovogdr https://tinyurl.com/y2chfr7p https://tinyurl.com/y5lbeq5n https://tinyurl.com/y2p74mpk https://tinyurl.com/y3ssne72 https://tinyurl.com/y3aowwhj https://tinyurl.com/y25crrq6 https://tinyurl.com/y5zegvnu https://tinyurl.com/yxpzzkgg https://tinyurl.com/y6qcz6u7 https://tinyurl.com/y4886ol2 https://tinyurl.com/y239sv5r https://tinyurl.com/yyfqfl6l https://tinyurl.com/y4ytlh4t
Views: 142400 SciShow
Evaluating academic articles
 
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------- Except as provided in the Copyright Act 1968, this item may not be reproduced in any form without the written permission of Monash University Library.
How Do I Choose the Best Journal for My Paper?
 
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HOW DO I CHOOSE THE BEST JOURNAL FOR MY PAPER? Which journal is the best one in scholarly publishing for my paper? This video lists the decision points when making this decision. MORE VIDEOS on Choosing Which Journal to Publish Your Article https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLqkE49N6nq3jkGjy26P2tVNragL2ik0c2 FIND OUT more about John Bond and his publishing consulting practice at www.RiverwindsConsulting.com SEND IDEAS for John to discuss on Publishing Defined. Email him at [email protected] or see http://www.PublishingDefined.com CONNECT Twitter: https://twitter.com/JohnHBond LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnbondnj Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/113338584717955505192 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/51052703-john-bond YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JohnBond BOOKS by John Bond: The Story of You: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/the-story-of-you/about-the-book/ You Can Write and Publish a Book: http://www.booksbyjohnbond.com/you-can-write-and-publish-a-book/about-the-book/ TRANSCRIPT: How do I decide the best journal for my paper? Hi there, I am John Bond from Riverwinds Consulting and this is Publishing Defined. Today I am to going to be discussing how to choose a scholarly journal for you to submit your paper to. A bit about me: I’ve been in scholarly publishing for over 25 year and as Chief Content Officer for a major medical publisher oversaw the publishing of over 20,000 peer reviewed articles. So, you have collected your data and information or completed your study. You have written your paper. Now what? Prior to deciding, make sure you have had the paper read and critiqued by your colleagues and associates. Consider very carefully their feedback and make the changes where you see fit. Remember to give it one more very close check for grammar, spelling, format and style before moving on. Now you are ready. In starting to consider where to submit your paper, create a chart or list of the options under consideration. Include the journals you read and receive; and the ones you respect. Ask your co-workers and colleagues what journals best fit the topic of your paper and have them weigh in on their opinions on the publications. In your chart, list these journal names and their urls. Most journal website will have an About section that will list the Mission or Aims and Scope of the publication. Read them and see if they align with your content and article format. Add to the chart the journal’s frequency; that is monthly, bimonthly, quarterly. Closely review the Information for Authors published for each Journal, likely at their website. This is the best guide to see if your article is a fit and will save everyone time. Read it very closely. Not just their mission but also the specifications for format and types of articles that are interested in. Also, if a journal has an Impact Factor, it may be listed at their website. If not, sometimes searching the web for that journal’s current Impact Factor will give you an answer. List whether the journal is subscription based, or sent to members of a Society, or an Open Access publication. Sometimes a journal may be more than one of these. If it is Open Access, check out the APC or Author Processing Charge and include the amount, if any. The more widely the journal is available, for example an Open Access publication, the more your article will get downloaded and read. Next check on where the journal is indexed. For instance, in medicine or nursing, being included in Medline or CINAHL are essential. Check for your area of specialty to see if the journal is covered in your key abstracting and indexing service. Once again, go the website and ensure articles are included online in addition to in the paper version of the journal. Are they posted online at acceptance or only when a print version appears? What may be listed at a website is the average time a paper takes to get from submission to decision and then the time it takes to get from acceptance to being published. If your topic has a sense of urgency to it, this time can be a critical decision. These times may not be publicly available. On occasion, the acceptance rate or rejection rate from the previous year may be listed. This would be a key piece of data as well. Search your topic over at a journal’s website to see if they have published any articles on it over the past two years. Most journals are looking for new or novel takes on existing topics and you might want to see what they have recently published. Finally, submit to just one journal at a time. I know it is tempting to reduce the wait time and send out to many journals or publications, but etiquette (and ethics) demand one at a time only.....
Views: 16074 John Bond
Scientific Article Academic Writing Workshop
 
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Narasumber : Ir. Chairul Hudaya, ST., M.Eng., Ph.D., IPM & Dr. Imam Jauhari Maknum ST., MT., M.Sc. Lokasi : Fakultas Teknik UI, Chevron Room.
Leadership Lab: Publishing in Academic Journals
 
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Publishing in academic journals can present unfamiliar challenges without clear-cut solutions. What should you publish, and when? How to find the right journal for your submission? How to respond to feedback from anonymous readers? In this workshop, a panel of faculty members and journal editors will shed light on the publishing process, and answer any questions you may have. Panelists: -Susan Allen, Managing Editor, American Journal of Sociology -John Brehm, Professor of Political Science, author of numerous single-author and joint-author articles -Jan Goldstein, Norman and Edna Freehling Professor of History, the Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science, and the College, editor of the Journal of Modern History -Linda Smith, Assistant Director of the University of Chicago Writing Program